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VOL 109 NO. 50 



ANTIOCH DECEMBER 1 5, 1 995 





mArrrr 



x*C-7 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



Sweet creation 

Antioch resident creates 
towering edible castle 
PAGEA9 



COUNTY 



Gang arrest 

Police nab suspects in 
gang shooting 
PAGEB1 tf 



LAKELIFE 



Homeforthe 




iDlyot'ce&f- 

blended 

families 

deal with 

sensitive 

questions, PAGE B 9 



SPORTS 





encounter 

Hundreds meet Kareem 
Abdul-Jabbar 
PAGE CI 9 

INDEX 

At Home,.. B15 

Busjness ................CI 

ClAssifiEcl. ...C5; 

CoumyNEws ..Bl 

CrossworcI..... ......B28 

EdiTORJAl/OpiNioiN ........... B4 

HEAlTJHWATch.. M' 

Horoscope B2 8 

LA K I; 11 lb i"V* »« -• » « . yi •'•* *■ *• * '» •• \* •,7** ■ 

Last Mjnute Cifi Cuiclc ..B24 
LeqaI N01 icEs ...... .A 1 4 & C 5 

LipSERvicE.... -<B29_ 

Movies .;. ,....B2? 

ObiiUARiEs :.:............ .....C4 

PurriNC, on'iIic RiTZ .; ..B6v 

SpoRTS....„..;,.....:......:C19- 

WIiereto;EatOut.:......B26 



ffflUNCHS PRESS 

ASSOCIATION 

1995 Award Winner 




Sewer study gets 
nod for township 

KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch County Board member Judy Martini delivered an early 
Christmas gift to residents living in unincorporated Antioch 
Township. 

Thirteen months of hard work carac to fruition when the County 
Board unanimously voted to spend $28,560 to. conduct a sewer 
feasibility study in Antioch Township. The study contract was 
awarded to Dcvcry Engineering Inc. of LibertyvilJc. 

"I cannot think of a greater Christmas gift than to give my district 
the opportunity to have the same services that other districts have," 
Martini said. 

The feasibility study, which is planned to begin Immediately, will 
determine the possibility and cost analysis of offering sewer service to 
unincorporated residents, the study will also include non-sewer 
alternatives for areas that might be too costly to provide sewer service. 

The United Homeowners Association of Unincorporated Antioch, 
Sec SEWER page A10 

Alarm clocks to help 
chronic tardy students 

KEVIN HANRAHAN • ... 

Staff Reporter • - .. .,. 

Moooo! 

Moooo! 

Each morning, four Antioch High School students wake up In the 

-morning to bellowing cows.or to blaring police sirens or to screaming 
train horns or to the military call of revelry. 

As a; last-ditch effort to prevent four students from imminent 
expulsion, Principal Susan Mullcndorc instituted operation alarm 

clock. 

. The school bought 10 alarm clocks and four were given to thfc four 
students who were on the verge of expulsion for chronic tardiness. 

"Wc have exhausted all other measures. One more tardy and they 
would be recommended for expulsion. We don't want to do that, so 
this is thcirlast chance," Mullcndorc said. 

The alarm clocks, however, are not the customary alarm-clock 
Sec TARDY page A10 



AH0757 12/28/95 
AHT1UCII TOHHSHIP LIBRARY 
757BMHWWCT ^ 

ftntiocli 

ANTIOCH PUB! IC llBR.^RV lDISTRlCT 01995 ' ASdiro<)dor . pu - c? ' lon 

75-7N. Ma.n Str-erjES' ' 50 GENTS f 

Antioch, II, CC-002' 





Naughty or nice? 

Catherine and Nicole Person, from Antioch, give Santa their 
Christmas list at Oakland School's Breakfast with Santa — 
Photo by Linda Chapman 



Cuneo Chrisirnas 

Museum Director Barbara Hlrschfoid oranges packages under 
a 20-foot Christmas tree in the Great Haft , of 'the Cuneo 
mansion. The house is decked out in festive styie for the 
holidays, for detalb. see page B 7 3— Photo by Undo Chapman 



Old friend 'Charlie' Cermak 
extends greetings to Antioch 

KEVIN HANRAHAN ■ 

Staff Reporter 

A longtime friend to Antioch wishes all a "Merry Christmas and 
Happy New Year!" 

Many old-timers are sure to remember the colorful Charles 
Cermak. Some may still be living in the house Cermak sold them 
while he was making a living selling real estate in Antioch. 

Lakeland Newspapers caught up with the former resident and 
realtor, affectionately known as "Charlie," who has since sought 
retirement in sunny Riviera Beach, Florida, 
for the past 22 years. 

As Antioch was preparing for its first 
major snow storm of the season, Cermak, 
who is living near balmy Palm Beach along 
the Atlantic coast, could only relate, "The 
weather is beautiful down here. It's about 
flO degrees. Wc get to sec the moon shine 
right on the water," 

And, of course, "The golf is fabulous," 
said Cermak, who replaced his fair share of 
divots at area golf courses including the 
once famous George Diamond Golf Course 
and Steak House, which is now the Antioch 
Golf Course. 

"That was the old steak house. He was 
famous for his steaks," Cermak recalled. 

The 84-year-old reminisced many other 
fond memories while living In Antioch. 

For example, during Prohibition his 
family moved from the "city" to Loon Lake, where Ccrmak's father 
owned an Ice cream parlor. 

Area residents of the time grew fond of the ice cream parlor, not so 
much- because of the good ice cream, but because Cermak's father 
served beer and liquor in a back-room parlor. 

"During the Prohibition days, wc used to serve beer through the 
soda fountains. Many farmers would stop by for some ice cream," 
See CERMAK page A10 




Charles Cermak 
shows the certificate 
he received for 50 
years service with the 
American Legion. 



- 












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Oh Christmas free 



Jill Colleen Hughes , third grade, and Candace Ester, 6th grade, put the finishing touches on 
the Christmas tree at Grass Lake School. All of the ornaments that decorate the beautiful tree 
were hand made by the students.— Photo by Linda Chapman 



4 , " 

Former AUGS employee investigated 



A longtime employee at 
Antioch Upper Grade School was 
advised to resign his position 
pending an investigation of a 
misappropriation of funds. 

According to officials from 
Antioch Community Consoli- 
dated School Dist.34, the board 
of education requested that Larry 
Schumacher. Sj_ .resign from his 
position as director of buildings, 
grounds and transportation. 

The ;,adviscmentj came after 
the boafdthj-ratcnod to dismiss 

Schumacher due to charges jof 
"serious misconduct involving 



misappropriation of property." 

Schumacher complied with 
the request and offered his resig- 
nation immediately on Nov. 30. 
Hired in 1987, Schumacher has 
been director of buildings, 
grounds and transportation for 
Dist. 34 for the past eight years. 

Superintendent Daniel Burke 
said school officials were asked 
by law enforcement authorities 
not to comment on the case. 
. "We're cooperating with the 
'^^authorities fully/^Burfco saiArSmcc' 
it is an ongoing Investigation, I real- 
ly can't comment on the case." 



The investigation has been 
handed to a special investigative 
unit of the Lake County State's 
Attorney's Office and the Antioch 
Police Dept . 

No charges have been filed, but 
officials said an indictment is pend- 
ing regarding the misappropriation 
of funds over a number of years. 
Details have not been released. 

"There are no formal charges 
filed. At this time, we're in the 
early stages of an Investigation,'* 
said Mary Schostock, the state's 
attorney assigned to the case. — 
by KEVIN HANRADAN 



Two-car crash results in minor injuries 



Antioch Rescue Squad transported three people 
to St Thcresc Hospital in Waukegan after a car side- 
swiped another car during the early morning rush 
hour Dec. 11. 

The two-car accident occured at North Avenue 
near Lakcwood Avenue at approximately 7:30 a.m, 

Bonnie Pclland, 42, of Antioch, arid her 15-year- 
old daughter as well as Nancy Smith, 29, of Kenosha, 
Wis., were taken to St Thcresc Hospital. All three 



were treated for minor Injuries and later released. 

According to police reports, Pclland claimed she 
was traveling east on North Avenue and while turn- 
ing north onto Lakcwood, she was struck by Smith. 

Smith told police she was traveling west on 
North Avenue when Pclland suddenly turned in 
front of her. 

Police ticketed Pclland for failure to yield for an 
accident. Both cars were towed from the scene. 



Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

Otfiea ol Publication: 30 SoulK WhKnoy St., 
Grayilake, IL 60030. Phono (708)223-8161. 

Published waokly, teoond doss pcniago paid at 
Gtayslako, IL 60030. 

Mail Subscription Rale* $24.50 Per Year by Mall 
paid In advance In Lata, Cook, Kenosha and 
McHoniy Counties; elsewhere $35.00 Per Year 
by Mail paid in advance. 

Postmaster; Send address changes to Antioch 
News-Reporter, 30 South Whitney Street, P.O. 
Box 268, Qrayslake, lllinoii 6003a 

(708)2123-8161 



Antioch News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundelein News. 
Grayslake Times 
Fox Lake Press . 



Gurnee Press 

Round Lako News 

Waueonda Leader 

Ubertyvitb News 

Lmdanhurst News 
Warren-Newport Press 



Vernon Hitts News 

M.R. SCHROEDER 

Foundor-1904-1986 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publlshor/ProskJonl 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

Goneral Manager 



JILLDePASQUALE MIMIK00B 
NANCY HURRELL KAREN 0T00LE 

ChuMMiatsrgUf. OctAJWlAfer. 

RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 
fitefeOM 



School group seeks 
input from residents 

ALEC JUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

While an ad -hoc committee struggles to find a single solution to the 
Antioch-Lake Villa- Lin den hurst school situation, the committee is 
unsure who should be included in the group. 

"I favor more of an all inclusive format," said Millburn Supcrintcnt 
James Menzer. I don't think any group should be excluded.'* 

"We should try to Include the business community," said 
Undenhurst Trustee James RetustaJc. 

The surrounding villages arc also participating In the process. The 
village of Antioch, Undenhurst and Lake Villa have sent representa- 
tives to these meetings. In the last meeting, Lake Villa didn't send a 
representative. 

The communities and the schools met for the second time to help 
set an agenda, or find some sort of solution for the already -cramped 
high school and feeder districts. 

"We all benefit from good schools,** said pr. Dennis Hockney, 
Antioch High School superintendent. "It (the group) should be repre- 
sentative of the community." 

Hockney suggested reaching out and asking area chamber of com- 
merce's to get involved. Also suggested by members is getting any cit- 
izen input. 

"We need that citizen input away from the educational experts," 
said Undenhurst Mayor Paul Baumunk. 

The committee will meet again on Dec 30 at 7 p.m. in the high 
school. 

Antioch High board wants 
greater parent involvement 



Condominium builder stalls 
on razing unsightly building 

KEVIN HANRAHAN ; 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch trustees arc still waiting for the developer of Pine Grove 
Condominiums to raze a dilapidated structure on the property before 
various village variances go into effect. 

Lindenhurst-bascd Christcnsen Construction Company proposes 
to build a 10-unit condominium complex at 639 Main Street. The com- 
plex will follow the townhome design concept 

Village Attorney Kenneth Clark drafted an ordinance in which the 
village grants Christcnsen Construction numerous variances including 
a zoning variance that allows for two buildings on what would other- 
wise be one zoning lot. The village also loosened its setback require- 
ments from a roadway. 

But Mayor Marilyn Shineflug insisted that Christcnsen demolish 
the existing building on the premises as soon as possible because the 
structure is becoming unsightly In the neighborhood. 

"I would say that we keep calling him," Shineflug said. "We want 
the situation to be corrected as soon as possible." 

Apparently, Al Christenscn, owner of Christcnsen Construction, 
had told the village zoning board that he would demolish the building. 
The village board said the variances would not be effective until the 
building was razed. 

"He still Intends to take It down," said Robert Silhan, director of 
planning, zoning and building. "He's aware of the situation." 

In another matter, village trustees agreed to leave a fencing issue 
open. Residents living adjacent to the condominium property asked 
that a privacy fence be erected during construction to limit the amount 
of debris from encroaching their property. The builder said he would 
erect a cyclone fence. 

"It's an unresolved issue, and I think we should leave it at that," said 
Trustee Marvin Oldenburgcr. 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Just as Uncle Sam pointed his 
finger to prospective soldiers, 
Antioch High School wants you — - 
the parents. 

In the upcoming months, the 
board of education and school 
officials hope to devise ways to 
encourage more parents to take a 
greater stake In their children's 
education and to become more 
involved in school happenings. 

Board member Wayne 
Sobczak noted that many parents 
visit the school only twice during 
their child's four years of high 
school. They come for the fresh- 
man open house and don't return 
until graduation day, he said. 
"We're going to have a better 
school if parents take an interest 
in their kids," Sobczak said. 

During a conference for 
school board members in 
Springfield, Sobczak said he came 
across studies which proved that 
greater parent involvement in 
school equates into better atten- 
dance and better grades for stu- 
dents. 

Unlike past years when par- 
ents were discouraged from visit- 
ing the school, Board President 



Phillip Delany encouraged the 
board to take a pro-active 
approach to encourage greater 
parent involvement In the school. 
"We have to convey to the par- 
ents that it is okay to be in the 
building, " Delany said. 

He said the board could per- 
sonally Invite 35 different parents 
to attend each board meeting. 

Board member Kathy 
Wefchck suggested a parent 
involvement night once a month 
for board meetings. 

"It would be nice if parents 
came and listened to the good 
and the bad, " Wcrchek said. 
*-■ Open houses, Sobczak said, 
do not serve their intended pur- 
poses. He said teachers arc telling 
him that the same handful of par- 
ents attend the open houses. 

"Teachers arc complaining 
that they are talking to the wrong 
parents," Sobczak said. "We need 
something with more teeth to get 
them here." 

Larry Peterson, a board mem- 
ber, suggested instead of an all- 
encompassing open house for par- 
ents, the school could open houses 
by department on various nights 
such as science night, a math 
night, a social studies night, etc. 




Tax levy hearing set Dec. 18 

A public hearing concerning the proposed budget and the 
proposed tax levy increase for the Village of Antioch will be held 
Dec. 18 at 7 p.m. in the Village Hall. The village is tentatively 
proposing a tax levy of $1,092,366, which is a 5 percent increase 
over last year's amount of property taxes collected. 

St. Peter's hosts Handel's Messiah 

The Antioch Community Choir will be performing its 
Christmas celebration when it presents Handel's Messiah Dec 
17 at 7:30 p.m. at St Peter's Church. The choir is hoping to raise 
enough donations to perform Staincr's Crucifixion for an Easter 
celebration in March at St. Benedict's Abbey. For more informa- 
tion call Mabel Lou Weber at 395-4210. 

Dickinson comes alive 

Park Avenue Antiques and Shoppes in Antioch will continue 
to hold the one-woman play of American poet Emily Dickinson 
through December on Sundays at 2 p.m. Titled "The Belle of 
Amherst," the play explores Dickinson's life on the homestead. 
Cost is $12 which includes finger sandwiches, assorted sweets 
and a high tea. To make reservations, call 838-1624. 



t » '» * 




COMMUNITY UkflANtl Newspapers DtcEMbt* 1 5, 1 995 



Mayor congratulates ACHS Team Scorpion for top 




KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter , 

Congratulations were in order 
once again as Antioch Mayor 
Marilyn Shlncflug extended 
hearty compliments to the 
Antioch High School "Scquolt 
Scorpion. Team." 

The team of prc-physicists 
and prc-enginecrs finished 
eighth in the country at a 
"Boosting Engineering Science 
and Technology" (BEST) com- 
petition held at Texas A&M 



University. 

The BEST program requires 
students to design and assemble 
a remote-controlled robot to 
collect noodles on a carpeted 
floor and deposit them in a scor- 
ing area. 

Antioch qualified for the 
national competition in Texas by 
placing second in the Chicago 
BEST competition. 

"We arc absolutely thrilled 
with what you've done as far as 
placing eighth in the nation," 



Shlncflug said. "Congratula- 
tions! We arc very proud of you." 
Sporting Team Scorpion T- 
shirts, members of the 'team 
included Juan Alvarez, Tom 
Bcltzcl, Jason Bolton, Clint 
Busch, Fred Fetingcr, Matt 
Fleming, Eric Green, Austin 
McElroy, Ed Please, and Ryan 
Smith. Team advisors included 
physics teachers Paul Boardman 
and John Krctsos and parents 
Sam Busch, PauJ Green, Ken 
McElroy and Roy Smith. 



Team member Clint Busch 
noted that the sturdy robot tasted 
the lost-minute flight to Houston. 
"The only thing we changed were 
the batteries," Busch said. 

Krctsos noted that the acade- 
mic competition between the 26 
schools very much resembled the 
energy of a prep basketball game 
or football playoff game. 

"It was like a football game. 
There was a lot of excitement," 
Krctsos said. 

Antioch High Superintendent 
Dennis Hockncy said the team's 



Amy Vanderkooy chosen as youth ambassador c , id • p 

. . ^.j ,^..,^d Vanderkooy was selected for her Allen Hansen. Hansen is the son I - ^ C H OO I IJ R I E lS 



accolades spoke well of the 
school's drive for academic 
achievement, i ••;.- 

"I think it means a lot about 
the level of academics in the 
school," Hockncy said. "They 
stretched to reach higher goals." 

He also noted that the board 
of education was able to garner 
the necessary funds to fly the 
team- td* Texas. The $3,000 trip 
was taken from the school's 
activity fund; "There were no tax 
funds used to support the trip," 
Hockncy declared. 




Arny Mario Vanderkooy 

The 1995-96 Hugh O'Brian 
Youth Ambassador is sopho- 
more, Amy Marie Vanderkooy, 
daughter of Fred and Dolores 
Vanderkooy of Antioch. 



Vanderkooy was selected for her 
involvement at Antioch 
Community High School and 
within tbc community. She has 
been an eight year member of 4- 
H, and has held several officer 
positions during her tenure. She 
is a youth ambassador for Brenda 
Edgar's campaign to help chil- 
dren, heads up a group to send 
Christmas cards to a retirement 
home, collects food for the food 
pantry, and helps provide birtli- 
day parties for the children at the 
Central Baptist Home in Lake 
Villa- At ACHS Vanderkooy par- 
ticipates in golf and soccer and is 
active in her class council, serv- 
ing as an officer for the past two 
years. 

The runner-up was Shawn 



*■■ 



cVieWs On • 
Cental Healtti 

By Brian Gniadek, D.D.S. 
IMPROVING YOUR SMILE 



When you're speaking, which are more 
visible, your upper or your lower teeth? 
If you look into the mirror, you'll dis- 
cover that it's your lower teeth that are 
more noticeable. Now smile. Surprised? 
Your upper teeth are more noticeable 
now. 

There's a good chance your dentist can 
improve upon your smile. He can check 
to see if your six upper teeth follow the 
upward curvature of the LOWER Ijp. 
This means that the two upper front 
teeth should be slightly longer than the 
teeth next to them. If they're too short, 
they may give your face a frowning 
look. 

If this is the case, an adjustment can 



be made to improve your appearance. If 
any of your front teeth arc of uneven 
length, he can contour their shape to 
make them even and to give the proper 
accent to your two front teeth, which 
should be longer. Chipped or broken 
teeth can be repaired. Any tooth badly 
damaged by decay can be crowned to 
protect it and given a natural look. 

Why not let your dentist check 
YOUR smile? You've got everything to 
gain. 

From the office of: 

Linden Family Dental Center 

2056 E. Grand Ave. 

Llndenhurst 

265-9070 



i :niiiiiiTfTiinTTT 



Since 1889 

Great Holiday Gift Ideas 

•Poinsettias (4"-10"pots) 

•Poinsettia Baskets 

•Evergreen Wreaths •Christmas Cactus 

•Christmas Cyclamen •Holiday Azaleas 

•Amaryllis 

•Statuaries •Fountains •Bird Baths 

Marty Schwind Greenhouse 

Since 1889 Open Year Round 

East of Rt. 59 on Grass Lake Rd. 

Antioch, IL • (708)395-3995 

Opent>aily9to5, 



nlMU. 



Allen Hansen. Hansen is the son 
of Jon and Valerie Hansen of 
Antioch. He is a three-season ath- 
lete, participating in cross coun- 
ty, basketball and track. He also 
participates in the German Club, 
Athletes Committed to 
excellence, and Acapclla Choir. 
One of the ways that Hansen 
served his community this sum- 
mer was to tutor a fourth-grade 
student in reading. Hansen has a 
strong desire to research subjects 
of interest and attempts to be 
very open to new ideas and view- 
points.. 



School closings, snow days 

When an emergency or bad weather occurs and requires 
schools to be closed, notification of the closing will be released 
for broadcast to WKRS 1220 AM and WLIP 1050 AM as party as 6 
a.m. Please do not call the schools for closing Information. 
Parents arc encouraged to listen to the radio. 

Schools celebrate holidays 

The last day of school for Antioch schools will be Dec. 20. 
For many of the elementary schools, classroom parties will 
begin around 1 p.m. and early dismissals may be in effect. All 
schools resume to class Jan. 3. 






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DcccMbf* 15,1995 LaIchIanc) Newspapers COMMUNITY 




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all 



Fire Dept. offers holiday safety tips 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

For the second consecutive year, the Antioch 
Fire Department hopes to keep its wreath in front of 
the station glowing with red lights. 

The Antioch Fire Department is participating in 
the "Keep the Wreath Red Program." Each time the 
department responds to a holiday- related fire, fire- 
men will change a red light on the wreath to a white 
light to signify the holiday season emergency. 

"We went last year without a holiday fire, and we 
haven't had any holiday fires yet tills year. All our 
lights arc stilJ red;" noted Captain Richard Frankson. 

In order to keep all the lights red, Frankson high- 
lighted a number of safety tips for homeowners to 
help prevent holiday fires and other emergencies. 

When purchasing a Christmas tree, make sure 
the pine needles stay in tact by pulling a branch. If 
the needles do fall off, choose another tree. 

Keep a live tree fresh by watering it daily. 

Frankson also said do not use indoor lights to 
decorate the outside of the house. 

■ He also advises to never leave Christmas tree 
lights on when not at home or when in bed. 

Electrical outlets should never be overloaded. He 
advised against using extension cords, but he said if 
they are used to be sure the wires arc not exposed. 
Never hide the wires under carpet. 



When using space heaters for extra warmth during 
sub-zero frigid weather, Frankson said never leave 
them unattended and to keep them away from com- 
bustible material such as paper, wires and furniture. 

"They should be at least 3 feet from combustible 
material," Frankson said. "Space heaters are radiat- 
ing heat and they can start a fire next to a couch as 
time goes by." 

He added that fuel-generated space heaters 
should be re-fueled outdoors. 

Frankson also recommends wearing layered 
clothing such as long underwear, turtle necks, 
sweaters and coats as opposed to just coats. 

"Wearing layers of clothing and regulating the 
amount of time you spend outdoors Is your best bet 
right now," Frankson said." 

With the winter comes many winter sports and 
activities such as snowmoBlling or ice fishing. 
Frankson suggested letting others know where you 
will be and for approximately how long. 

"Let people know where you are going just in 
case of an emergency," Frankson said. 

Me went on to add that early signs of frost bite 
include hurting and aching accompanied by a tin- 
gling sensation. Me said if the tissue is frozen, people 
should avoid rubbing their hands. 

"A lot of common sense goes a long way," 
Frankson said. 



'Lights on for Life' observance setfor Dec. 15 



Young adult drinking drivers 
In Lake County and across the 
nation, particularly males ages 21 
to 34, arc the focus of National 
Drunk and Drugged Driving (3D) 
Prevention Month activities in 
December. 

Those drivers arc significantly 
over-represented in DUI (Driving 
Under the Influence) crash statis- 
tics, including fatalities, said Judy 
Fried, executive director of the 
Northern" Illinois "Council on 
Alcoholism and Substance Abuse 
(NICASA). 

Lake County Coroner Barbara 
*Ri(tf ar&ori7aWmber ofMCAS/Vs ' 
Board of Directors, said that young 
adult drinking drivers represent the 
highest DUI-rclated traffic fatalities 
in Lake County in 1994. 

Richardson said while the 
number of underage drunk dri- 
vers has decreased by 40 percent 
nationally over the past 10 years, 
the number of impaired drivers 
aged 21 to 34 had only decreased 
by 3.7 percent. 

She said it's especially tragic 
to sec young lives snuffed out 

"It's devastating not only to 
those who have lostthcir lives but 
to the lives of the families left 
behind," Richardson said. 



Fried said data provided by 
the IKS. Dept. of Transportation 
shows that young adult drinking 
drivers: 

• comprise more than half of 
all the impaired drivers involved 
in alcohol-related fatal crashes, 

• are responsible for more 
alcohol-related fatal crashes than 
any other age group, and 



• have the highest blood alco- 
hol concentrations (DACs) in fatal 
crashes. 

As part of that national effort to 
focus attention on the impaired dri- 
ving issue, NICASA is encouraging 
private citizens throughout the area 
to keep their vehicle headlights on 
as they drive during the day on 
Friday, Dec 15. 



FOOT 

FACtfS 

From The 
FOOT DOCTOR 



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Specialist 



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BUIVIONS 

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untreated may cause joint damage. 

Treatment options can vary. If surgery is indicated, it is 
performed outpatient with state of the art procedures that allow 
same day walking, and little or no time off from work. 

If vou have the above symptoms or any other foot discomfort you 

may contact Dr. Winters for a MO COST CONSULTATION to see if 

there may be an answer to your foot pain. 



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Come Woi-sliip With Us 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



QraetUnd Baptist Church. 258 Ida St., Antioch, II. 
Sunday School 11 a.m.,Moming Worship 11 a.rrt, 
Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robert William*, Pajlor 

Flfil Church of Chrlat, Sciential & Raiding Rm. Rte. 
173 and Harden, Antioch. Phone (708) 39S-1 1G6. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Sarvlce 10:30 am. Wednesday, 

8 p.m. 

Calvary Baptist Church. SS4 Partway. Phone (708) 
395-3393. Sunday School 10 sun., Sunday Worship 
1 1 a.m. and 7 p.m. 

81. Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Main St., Phone (708) 395- 
0652. Low Mass 7:30 a.m, High Mass 930 a.m. Sunday 
Softool & Nursery 9:30 a.m. 

Anlloch Evangsllcsl Frse Church. 750 Highview. 
Phone (708) 395-4117. Sundiy School 9:45 am., 
Sunday Worship 8:30, 11:00, Children's Church 
11 a.m. Nursery, Awana Club, Bible studies, youth pro- 
grama, etc.. 

81. BUphen Lutheran Church. Hillside & Rle. 59. Phone 
(708) 395-3359. Sunday Worship. 8, 9:15 1 10:30. ' 
Church School 9 a.m.. Sunday The Rev. Charles E. 
Miller, Pastor. 

Christian Lite Fellowship Aeasmbllta ol (Sod Church. 
41625 Deep Lake Rd., Antioch. Phono (708) 395-8572. 
Sunday School (all ages) 9 a.m., Sunday Morning 
Worship 10 a.m., Children's Church 10 a.m..Sunday 
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m., Wednesday Worship 4 



Children's Program 7 a.m, Tuea. Women's Fellowship & 
Bible Study 9-1 1:30 a.m. Jerf BrussaJy, Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St. Phone (708) 
395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30 am., Sunday 
School 9:25 ani, Mon. 7 p.m. Rev. DaraW Qruen, Rev. 
Gregory Hermanaon, Pastors. Christian Day School (708) 
395-1664. 

Mlllbum Congregational United Church ot Christ. 
Grass Lake Rd. el Rte. 45 Phone (708) 356-5237. 
Sunday service 10 am. Children's program 10 am Rev. 
Paul R. MelUer, Pastor. 

United Methodist Church of Antloeh. 848 Main St. 
Phone (708) 395-1259. Worship 8:30 & 10 a.m; 
Fellowship Time 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.rn. 
The Rev. Kurt A. GamSn. Pastor. 

St. Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St, Antioch. Phono 
(70S) 395-0274. Massas weekdays, 7:15 4 8 am, 
Sunday 6:30, 8, 9:30, 1 1 a.m & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 
5:30 p.m Pastor Rev, Father Lawrence Hanley. 

Chain of Lake* Community Bible Church. 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Rd., Antiooh, Phone (708) 838-0103 Sunday 
Worship B:15 and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45. Children's 
Church 10:45. Youth, Women's, Awana & Small Group 
ministries. S ardor Pastor, Rev. Don Sweeting. r 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod), ■_ 
25100 W. Grend Avo. (Rls. 59 4 132), Lake Villa, (708) 
356-51S8. Sunday Worship 8:15 4 10:45 a.m.; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Rev. John 
Zollmer, Pastor, Christian Preschool. 




Dan Dugonske, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang funeral Home of Antioch 



PolicE Beat 



Persons charged with a crime are Innocent until proven 
guilty In a court of law. 

Furniture incites dispute 

Antioch police arrested and charged Ryan Schneider, 24, of 
Antioch, for disorderly conduct Dec. 5 after he removed some 
furniture and shouted obscenities at a residence on North 
Avenue. According to police reports, Schneider explained that 
he was taking the furniture because the homeowner had not. 
paid for the items. The homeowner said he was led to believe 
the furniture was a gift Schneider and the victim were friends 
and were drinking at the time of the incident, police said. Police 
also noted that the furniture dispute had to be settled in civil 
court, but Schneider was charged with disorderly conduct. He 
was released pending a court date in Grayslake Jan. 24. 

Bad mufflers result in arrests 

On Dec. 6, police stopped a vehicle traveling on Main Street 
near Depot Street for an "excessively loud muffler* and arrested 
Christine Alcock, 32, of Antioch. After Alcock stepped out of the 
vehicle, police found an open case of "Icehouse" beer behind the 
driver's seat with four cans missing. The four missing cans were 
later found empty under the passenger scat Although Alcock dis- 
played Michigan license plates, police learned her driver's license 
was suspended in Illinois. Alcock was charged with driving with a 
suspended license, illegal transportation of alcohol, not wearing a 
scat belt, and defective muffler. She posted $1,000 recognizance 
bond and will appear in Grayslake court Dec 27. 

On Dec 10, police stopped Glenn Boyd, 42, of Antioch, on 
Main Street near North Avenue for driving with a "muffler sys- 
tem dragging on the ground." After Boyd could not post a dri- 
ver's license, police learned his license expired in April. He was 
charged with driving without a valid license and for a defective 
muffler. 

Speeder's license suspended 

On Dec. 7, police clocked Kristen Fritz, 25, of Lindcnhurst, 
traveling 74 mph in a 55 mph zone near Deep Lake Road and 
Depot Street. After further investigation, police learned Fritz's 
license was suspended. She was charged with speeding and dri- 
ving with a suspended license. She was released on recog- 
nizance bond and will appear in Grayslake court Dec. 27. 



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Gentle, Effective Chiropractic Care 



By Dr. Thomas G. Collins 

Chiropractic Physician 
Atlas Orthoganist 

WHIPLASH INJURIES 



A common form of whiplash occurs when the 
bead is suddenly flexed forward, then If snapped 
backwards. ThU type of injury mon commonly 
occun In motor vehicle ace id end Involving a 
rear or frontal Impact producing a sudden accel- 
eration/decelentloti movement to the head and 
neck. Whiplash manifests itself with, but is not 
limited to the following symptoms: headache, 
neck stiffness and pain, jaw problem* (TMJ dis- 
orders). A tingling sensation and pain in the 
shoulder* and arms may be caused by nerve irri- 
tation in the neck. The nerve Irritation may be'a 
result of • misaligned bone in the neck portion of 
the spine. 

Besides automobile accidents, many other types 
cf accidents can severely stress die structural 
aspects of the neck with the lime results such as 
a fall (ex. slipping on ice), a blow to the head, 
being shoved from behind or any movement 
causing a sudden motion in the neck. • 



For these reasons. It Is Important to visit a 
Chiropractic Office immediately following any 
neck-lnjuxing accident. A Chiropractor Is clini- 
cally experienced in treating musculoskeletal 
disorder* In a non-invasive manner. A 
Chiropractor will perform an examination and 
corrective adjustments to the affected structures, 
if needed to help (he body heal any inflammation 
and eliminate nerve irritation which will avoid 
serious neck problem* at a later date. 

From the office oft 
Northern IL. Chiropractic 

Linden Plaza 
2118 East Grand Avenue 
. Undenhurst, Illinois 60046 

(708) 265-6400 



VI 



•••i-:> ' :'.- 




COMMUNITY UlcElANd Newspapers DccEMb» 15, 199 5 









Some of the most cherished moments parents have 



While feasting with their 
family at the Thanksgiving meal, 
Ma and Pa SchmchI took quite a 
raking over the coals when their 
children learned that they 
indeed had every intention of 
putting up their old, dilapidated 
and mismatched outdoor deco- 
rations. 

Tills had become one of those 
traditions that just would not he 
broken even though the forcmen- 
tioncd decorations were held 
together with chewing gum, 
Rimer's glue and the "every 
man's cure for broken things" — 
duct tape. 

Oh sure, the paint was peel- 
ing, the snowman was crooked; 
the lights had no rhyme or reason 
as to color, size, or shape; Santa 
was worn; and the reindeer 
couldn't have flown with hurri- 
cane winds behind them — but 
they still worked and, by God, 
they would be going up. So, 
shortly after Thanksgiving din- 
ner, out Pa SchmchI went, armed 
with extension cords, hammer, 
nails, ladder and duct tape. 

Across the street from the 
elder Schmchls resides their 
daughter and son-in-law. These 
two clever youngsters had been 
designing and laying out plans as 
to what their display would look 
like since last Christmas, They 
had stockpiled decorations dur- 
ing the previous year's "After 
Christmas Sales." 

Inside and outside was per- 
fectly coordinated, from the little 
red lights on the brand new nine 
foot Christmas tree in the win- 
dow, down to the "110 MO HO" 
running across their roof in twin- 
kling red lights. 

The display consisted of 
enough lighted lawn decorations 
to cause Commonweal th Edison 
to revert to a back-up power 



source when they threw the "ON" 
switch. So much thought and 
effort had been put Into this dis- 
play, unlike the in-laws across the 
street, who haphazardly placed 
decorations, ornaments and 
lights wherever there may have 
been a loose nail sticking out of 
the house. 

The younger generation sat 
gloating, surrounded by their 
highfaluting extravaganza while 



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Ma and Pa sat across the street a 
bit humbled. 

Then came the infamous 
Sunday after that grueling 
Thanksgiving dinner. Dear son- 
in-law went to light up his spec- 
tacular spectacle and (this is the 
part Ma and Pa liked the best) 
after throwing the switch and 
expecting this blinding blaze, he 
was greeted with absolutely noth- 
ing; there wasn't a glow, a twin- 
kle, not even a mere flicker. Not a 
single light lit! Yet across the 
street, the old peeling paint, duct 
taped Santa, reindeer, elves and 
snowman filled the night air with 
a dull glow. 

Of course, Ma SchmchI calls 
the children nightly as dusk sets 
in and smugly inquires as to the 
status of their predicament, only 
to be addressed in short, curt, 
answers. The son-in-law has 
vowed to find the culprit in the 
whole over-loaded system. The 
hi-tech couple is in for a bit of a 
surprise, though. When the situa- 
tion is finally rendered and the 
lighted extravaganza once again 



St. Peters holds annual cookie walk 



St. Peter's Council of Catholic 
Women will hold the annual 
Cookie Walk on Dec. 16 after the 
5:30 p.m. Mass,. and on Dec. 17, 



after the fi a.m. Mass until 1 p.m. 
Tli ere will also be a mini-bazaar. 
Cookies may be dropped off after 
2 p.m. on Dec. 16. 



fills the night air like the head- 
lights of God's mini-van, the two 
youngsters had better look close- 
ly at their decorations. 

You sec, Pa SchmchI took the 
opportunity of their unfortunate 
blackout to do a little creative 
rearranging of his own. While the 
ensemble lay dark, Pa rerouted 
the flaming "HO HO HO" lights 
on the rooftop to read "HA HA 
HA". Merry Christmas Donna 
and Dennis, from Ma and Pa. 

More cherished moments 

It seems there is a young man 
in Antioch, the son of a well- 
known individual in- town, who 
really doesn't have much to do 
with dear old mom except, per- 
haps, when monetary substances 
run a bit low. 

As the young man was on his 
way to school on a very cold 
November morning, his automo- 
bile decided it was time to stop run- 
ning because there was nothing in 
its belly to keep it going. 

Sonny boy couldn't get th rough 
to his "Chatty Kathy" mom because 
she was tying up the phone line 
with her morning gossip session, 
luckily, he was only about a mile 
from home, so this particular 
young gentleman had no choice 
but to walk home— without a coat, I 
might add, because coats arc for 
wimps. Upon reaching home, he 
borrowed from mom money for gas 
and his sister's car; mom doesn't 
drive. 

The next day after school this 
same young man went out snow- 
mobiling with a friend. 
Fortunately, this time he was only 
a half-mile from home, because, 
shazaam! It happened again. For 
the second time in a week, his 
mode of transportation refused 
to go any further. 

The sled stopped dead in its 
tracks. The gas tank sat on empty 
and again, the son found himself 
heading for home with nothing to 
carry him but his two measly little 
legs, much to the delight of his 
tickled mother. 

So to this dear lad, the son of a 



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friend, and one that doesn't seem 
too wise, I have this bit of advice: 
I don't know what they arc teach- 
ing you in school these days, but 
as much as you would like to 
believe, the "E" on the fuel gauge 
docs not stand for "Enough". 

"TIs the Season 

Antioch has yet one more way 
to celebrate the Christmas holi- 
day. Hie Antioch Community 

-New ArrjvaIs- 



Chorus will present the 
Christmas portion of "Handel's 
Messiah" under the direction of 
An t ioch's very own Ralph Brooke. 
The concert will take place on 
Dec 17 at 7:30 p.m. at St Peter's 
Church In Antioch, The produc- 
tion is sponsored by the Festival 
Arts of Antioch and made possi- 
ble by. donations from businesses 
and individuals. Admission is 
free.. 



v 



Kayman Michael Bobnlc 

A son, Kayman Michael, was born Nov. .7 at Condcll Medical Center to 
Christine Mortenscn and Mike Bobnlc of Antioch. Grandparents arc Maureen 
Traycs of Antioch, Darlene and Al Bobnlc of Johnsburg. Great grandparents arc 
Raymond Traycs of Antioch, Vivian Mortenscn, of Antioch. 

Solon Dustln Slater 

A son, Solon Duslin, was born Nov. 8 at Lake Forest Hospital to Charlotte 
Rocd and William Slater of Antioch. 

Kylee Nicole Hlgglns 

A daughter, Kylcc Nicole, was born Nov. 8 at Condcll Medical Center to 
Scan and Lori Higgins of Antioch. She has a brother', Alex, 3 and a sister, Holli, 
6. Grandparents are Frank and Terrell Miyamoto of Gurncc, Sandra Graham of 
Antioch. Great grandmothers arc Frances Andrews of Libcrtyvillc, Emma 
Higgins of Center Point, Iowa. 

Caltlln May Palmer 

A daughter, Caltlln May, was born Oct. 24 at Condcll Medical Center to 
Richard and Tamara Palmer of Antioch. Grandparents arc Ted and Dawn 
Burbridgc of Antioch, Dick and Gerry Palmer of Fox Lake. Great grandmother is 
Maxync O'Day of Lake Villa. 




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Dccubn 1 1, 1»»J UktlAKcl Ncwsp«pciK COMMUNITY 




Community banks survive mergers 

m/IMUAMDAUAtl A - '.".'1 . -. ' *-^ 



Top sellers 

The Anttoch Upper Grade School PTO held a successful 
flower bulb sale, which raised more than $5,300. Students 
who sold more than $60 were picked to try their hand In a 
free-flowing cash station. Top sellers Included, from left; Ben 
Lvinger, Tim Grala, Desl Geng. and Jenny Ravin. Geng was 
1he highest seller at $340. 



Antioch Rotary maintains 
strong exchange program 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 
Staff Reporter 

Whether it's by finding a host 
family to. open their home for a 
foreign exchange student or 
preparing an Antioch High stu- 
dent to go abroad", the Antioch 
Rotary Club keeps active with its 
long-term and short-term stu- 
dent exchange programs. 

As part of its Youth Exchange 
Program during the past 15 years, 
the Antioch Rotary Club has 
helped bring between one or two 
students a year from abroad as 
well as help send anywhere 
between two to five Antioch High 
students to a choice of more than 
50 countries. 

"It's certainly one of the pro- 
grams this club serves well. The 
Antioch' Rotary Club is the most 
active club in the region in terms 
of exchange students," noted 
Stan Livcrmorc, youth exchange 
officer for the Antioch Rotary 

Club. 

Livcrmorc noted that the 
Antioch club participates with 
the Youth Exchange Program 
through Rotary International. 
The goals of the program, 
Livcrmorc said, arc to promote 
world peace through under- 
standing. 

Antioch's role indudes pay- 
ing dues to the international 
organization which helps pay for 
student exchange insurance, 
selecting local students who wish 
to go abroad, and locating local 
host families to receive foreign 

students. 

Currently, three Antioch High 
students are living and going to 
school abroad. Ruth Warren is In 
Brazil, Bryan Siebel is in 
Germany, and Megan Aronson is 
in the Philippines. 

In addition, two more stu- 
dents, Adam Ricdel and Erika 
Decker, have been selected to go 
abroad. "We just got the word 
this week, so we don't know 
where they are going yet, 
Livcrmorc said. 

At the same time, Olot 
l>eronlus from Sweden is now liv- 
ing with the Livcrmorc family. 

In the long-term exchange 
program, a foreign exchange stu- 



dent lives with three different 
families during his or her year- 
long stay in Antioch. 

livcrmorc is now promoting 
the short-term exchange program 
in which a*, foreign student lives 
with a single family for six weeks. 

"It's^a'vcry different experi- 
ence than the yearlong pro- 
gram," Uvcrmore said. * "It's 
thought of as more oF a holiday." 

He said the Antioch Rotary 
Club is seeking families to spon- 
sor exchange students from 
Brazil from Jan. 6 through Feb. 
17. Interested families can call 
Livcrmorc at 395-4200. 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 
Staff Reporter 

It may be interpreted as anoth- 
er case of the rich getting richer or 
' the big getting bigger. 

Randy Miles, president of the 
State Bank of the Lakes in Antioch, 
gave a brief scenario to Antioch 
Rotarians of the banking status 
across the country, In the state and 
in local communities. 

During the wave of bank merg- 
ers in the last five years, Miles 
noted that the top 3 percent of the 
biggest banks (which amounts to 
about 400 banks) in the country 
has come to control 74 percent of 
the assets, while the smallest banks 
in the country (which indudes 
more than 10,000 banks) control 
less than 8 percent of the assets. 

"That's a little Interesting (as 
an indication) of where things are 
going, especially for community 
banks," Miles said. With its main 
charter in Antioch, the State Bank 
of the Lakes has branches in 
Lindenhurst and Grayslakc. 

With the rash of mergers and 
banks buying other banks, the 
actual number of banks has 
decreased by 28 percent In the last 
decade, while the number of 
branches has increased by 32 per- 
cent in the same time period, 
Miles pointed out 

The banking industry In 
Illinois seems to follow the same 
trend nationwide. 

The biggest 20 banks in the 
state control 59 percent of the 
assets, while the smallest 615 banks 



control 12 percent of the assets. 

In other words, "Sixty percent 
of the assets are in 2 percent of the 
banks in the state," Miles said. 

Similarly, the number of banks 
in tHc state has decreased by 27 
percent In the last decade, while 
the number of branches has 
increased by 133 percent 

That's a lot of consolidation 
and a lot of mergers," Miles said. 

He also noted that six of the 10 
largest bank acquisitions in US. 
history occurred this year. The 
largest was Chemical Bank buying 
Chase Manhattan for a $10 billion 
deal. 

»Tou're going to sec more and 
more of the big banks buying 
other banks and the deals will get 
bigger and bigger," Miles said. 

Why the sudden wave of big 
banks buying other banks or 
merging with other banks? 

Despite what economists and 
bank leaders want people to 
believe, Miles said the answer is 
quite simple: "It comes down to 
money." 

"The larger players want to 
bulk up to survive. They get bigger 
and bigger by mergers," Miles 
said. "They don't grow by bringing 
in more money; they grow by buy- 
ing up the competition." 

He added, They knock on my 
door all the time, and they're will- 
ing to pay." 

Miles compared the bank con- 
solidation with the rise of big gov- 
ernment Bigger has come to mean 
less efficient and less personable. 




Randy Miles 



"Just like big government, you 
see a big difference in your finan- 
cial services with big banks as 
compared to community banks," 
Miles said. 

He said the community bank 
still serves -as the economic cata- 
lyst in the community because H; 
too, has a stake in the community. 
For example, many times a 
branch community bank will 
build a full-size bank that offers all 
the services of the main chartered 
bank; whereas, the big national or 
state banks will come to town and 
only build small branch banks. 

"Community banks are the 
backbone of your community," 
Miles said. "To be a community 
bank you have to be able to do 
everything people would expect 
out of a community bank." 



Fox Waterway Agency praises McHenry Twp. 



Fox Waterway Agency Chairman William Dam 

and Director Stan J. Mill expressed the ir agon cy's 
gratitude to McHenry Twpl Highway Commissioner 
Chuck MajcrcUc for his assistance in trucking sedi- 
ment from boat-blocked township channels during 
the past year. 

"We've dredged an estimated 15,000 cubic yards 
of soil this past year from McHenry Township chan- 
nels alone," stated Dam. "This could not have been 
done without the help of Chuck Majercik," further 
explained Mill. 



While the agency pays the cost of all the dredg- 
ing, permitting MwlplmntanlMirfHwmwi*;*- 

agency has generally required someone else, to pay 

for the cost of trucking sediment from the public 
side channels serving subdivisions. Many home- 
owners in these subdivisions have trouble raising all 
the trucking funds needed to move the silt. 

Participation by the township helps bridge that 
gap. "This is a great example of government work- 
ing together to serve the township property owners 
and the township boaters," concluded Dam. 



December 

1995 



Community 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Friday 



15 



Saturday 



16 



1 1 a.m.- Oakwood Knolls 
2 p.m. Property Owners 
Association holds 
annual food drive 
at the park for 
Antioch Food 
Pantry. 395-0754 



Sunday 



17 



Tuesday 



19 



6:30 p.m. Antioch Chamber 
of Commerce 
meets at communi- 
ty building 

7 p.m. Women's Club of 
Lindenhurst holds 
bingo at civic cen- 
ter 

7:30 p.m. Lindenhurst Park 

District Board meets 



20 



Wednesday 



6:45 p.m. Nicotine 

Anonymous meets 
at St. Therese Area 
Treatment Satellite, 
Lake Villa. 356-6600 

7 p.m. Antioch Park 

Commission meets 

7 p.m. TOPS meets at Holy 
Family Church, 
Lake Villa. 587-1422 
or 587-5994 



1 1 a.m. Shut In Mass for the 
handicapped at St. 
Peters Social 
Center 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Community 
Choir presents 
Handel's Messiah 
at St, Peters 
Catholic Church 



Monday 



18 



Thursday 



21 



6 p.m. TOPS meets at 
Antioch Manor 

• Apts. 395-8143 

7:30 p.m. ACHS Board of 

Education meets at 
the ACHS board 
room 

• Loon Lakes 
Management 
Association meets 
at Antioch Senior 
Center 



10:30 a.m. Rational Recovery 
Self Help Network 
meets at Lake 
County Health 
Dept. 838-2530 

6 p.m. Police and Fire 
Commission 
meets 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Village 
Board meets 



Coming Up: 

Dec. 27 CAN meets at 
7:30 p.m. First National 

Bank of Antioch 



Dec. 28 Irish American 
7:30 p.m. Club holds meet- 
ing at State Bank 
of the Lakes, 
Antioch. 395- 
3942 



GOT SOMETHING GOING ON? CALL US1 Tina Reulbach 223-8161^ 






1 



■ 



> • i (i i > • 




JI COMMUNITY IaIcfIancI Nlws|>a|>ers DecemBcr 1 5, 199 5 



The mail in Antioch is most important this time of year 



RUSS FAIRCHILD 

Correspondent 
Antioch Post Office 

The consensus of opinion is 
that the maU is one of the most 
important issues at this time of the 
year. I don't dispute that, when you 
watch the activity here. A beehive! 
That postmaster Tom Prince has 
to contend with, and does a mas- 
terful job of it 

However, with assistance like 
Jan McRae, Dawn Elluart, Cclc 
Hojcn, Judy McKinlcy, Jerry 
Bohman, Supt. Larry Darling, 
Clerk/Window David Vos, and Jill 
Cunningham. They spend long, 
tedious hours braving the ele- 
ments. But they all observe the slo- 
gan, "Mail must go through." 

Ask any of these retired workers: 
"Happy Holidays" to Jean Irving, 
Carol Buchta, Andrea Goodc, 
Wilbcr Gcrs, Fred Vermcycn, Larry 
Dullingcr, Helen Baiccr, Sargc 
McBridc, Sandy Stachcl, and Jerry 
Parish, to mention only a few. 

Lakes Area Barber Shop 

Don Kcrkman, proprietor, Is 
not only a good barber, but has the 
happy faculty to draw folks from 
different walks of life. I was one of 
his first customers. To wit Audrey 
Ostcrgard, columnist; Claude 
LcMere, popular writer plus; Bill 
Barr, businessman and friend; and 
Chuck Miller, chief of police. 

Bobble's Lakeside 
Restaurant 

Bob and Silvana Fidanowski arc 
proprietors. "Welcome Mat" 
Realtor Addie Goodrich was talk- 
ing to Bill Pflaum, talented pianist, 
who most days has a stack of mutt 
to check as he relaxes in a booth. 

Marvelous Marilyn Edwards, , 
popular waitress, says she has been 
on all sides of the restaurant world. 
I believe her. Another popular 
waitress, well known and liked, is 
Penny Soulak, , hostess. George 
Ptack, professional golfer, is just 
leaving as Milton Tate comes in. A 
nice feature about Bobbie's Place is 
that he not only holds on to the 
former patrons, but adds new faces 
with die sociability that customers 
will welcome. 

Katie Davis from St. Peter's 
Parish, a steady customer, is being 
catered to by Linda. Howard Wells, 
• a person you're always pleased to 
meet, is sitting at one of the new, 
beautiful marble top tables. Several 
booths were eliminated. 

Off the cuff 

If at times my column seems 
similar to other years, you're 
absolutely right, because I'm on a 
stroll through die same Antioch 
streets, meeting mostly die same 
folks, in the same places. Moral to 
all this is: "Let's all just be so thank- 
ful we're still around to take one 
more stroll." Thank God and amen. 

Mabel Lou Weber 

Mabel Lou has always been a 
' wonderful person, and deserves all 
the applause she gets, because she 
earned it! 

McDonald's 

I was sorry to see Virginia 
Carney, manager, transferred from 
' here, where she was doing a fine 
job. And Alice Cicsla is leaving also. 
Rumors had it, back and forth, that 
this store was on the chopping 
block. The consensus of opinion 
(what a joke) was so distorted, We 
finally sat back and said, "Malrzy 
dotes and doazy doats and little 
lambs cat ivy — a kid'll cat ivy, too, 
wouldn't you? 

George and John Ostrandcr, 
two popular engineers, Mary 



Hancock and JooMatusck, arc hav- 
ing breakfast John Gorr and John 
Locpcr also. Popular Laddie 
M arnica attends to George Boyd, 
an avid collector of Spike Jones 
records. Ann Petrisko, who made a 



.^RdlHllROUGri 




II vj'nU 


Russ FAJRcMd 



fine step into politics, is reading the 
Antioch Reporter. Helen Ottofino, 
caller for bingo on Mondays, and 
Herbert Frank from Trevor. 

Bob Lasco, pleasant and promi- 
nent businessman, and special 
connoisseur of evergreens, is very 
well liked. And here enters two 
prominent Moose members and 
lovable folks besides all this, 
Bobbie and Ken KnackstcdL Well 
known lady about town, Virginia 
Flood, is sitting by Sue Sehafcr, 



nlal lady, is so well liked by all of us. 
She joins Jackie and Reggie 
Stcbblns, doing his "soft shoe" 
dance near Lorraine, but she sits 
down. 

Here once again Is Lisa 
Hagdahl, for many years a profes- 
sional organist at the "Crystal Tap" 
of the Brcvoort Hotel in downtown 
Chicago, where at times Wayne 
King, the "Waltz King," and 
Franklyn McCormack, also starred. 
Also, we're pleased with the pres- 
ence of Jcanic Lindstrom, popular 
columnist with the Wcstosha 
Report Newspaper. 

Henry Hoflkamp, well liked util- 
ity man, who keeps the windows 
spotless, (along with anything he 
touches), is there. He's "Mister 
Kfccn." Now, please meet Rosebud 
Sunitch, a popular and pretty lady 
who brightens up the day with her 
pleasant personality. And in the 
same vein, a counter clerk, who's 
friendly personality and charm 
with the customers brings about 
just what is needed when tension 



professional trainer and breeder of appears, Lcona Thornton's charac- 



dogs. 

Ray and Phyllis Maaskc, lovable 
couple, are there, as are Irma and 
Pauline. Ray Fox and Clara Koyoko 
(bingo) arc there. My dear friends 
and neighbors, Gary and Ronda 
Quedcnfcld, stopped in with their 
cute boys, Patrick and Nathan. 
Eleanor Hauscr, a popular, conge- 



tcr, poise and efficiency win out! 

While I'm at it, the same applies 
to another employee, at a hot cor- 
ner with tension. Judy Mazzuca at 
the "take out" auto window, 
deserves a "pat on the back!" And 
marvelous Mary Boyd, a hard 
working employee with special 
traits and ability. 



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Around Antioch on the Katris family than any otli- 

Thls has got to be my dear crs, because I admire their forti- 

friend and columnist, Audrey tude, patience and friendship. 

Ostcrgaard, who has branched out They have certainly been an asset 
in all ways touching all bases, on 



interesting subjects. She Is a natur- 
al writer that is easy to read and 
enjoy, and thaf s half the battle. 
Much better than just having your 
foot in the door! 

1 marvel at her vitality and 
knowledge. It's a pleasure to meet 
her at times, and I'm very happy to 
call her "my friend." 

Las Vegas Restaurant 

The Katris Family, John, Gail, 
Chris and Nikki. This is still one of 
my favorite places, as I've known 
them from the day they (John) 
opened at the Lakeside. 

However, I've already written 
(with their permission) about their 
start in Antioch — and their earned 
success many years ago. Donald 
Skldmorc will agree. And believe 
made, as one of their first friends, 
and still am, I'm happy to say t hat! 

To my steady friends and read- 
ers of my many articles, and strolls 
through town— I've penned more 



to Antioch. I wish them continued 
success, good health and happi- 
ness in all their endeavors. God 
Bless! 

I have been looking for a dear 
friend every time I enter die Las 
Vegas" Restaurant She was a 
columnist for the Antioch Reporter 
named Liz Schmehl— The lizard, 
writing her popular "Hometown 
Goodies." 

Sunshine, Kenosha 

If you're ever In the vicinity of 
tiiis place, don't fall to stop in at the 
beautiful surroundings belonging 
to Gus Dimantopoulos and Ills 
lovely wife, Yaiin a. 
Editors note; Russ Fairchild has 
been sharing his annual stroll 
through Antioch with the Antioch 
NewsrReporter for many years. 
After a hiatus from his annual col- 
umn in 1994, Russ has returned to 
share the sights and personalities of 
Antioch. Buss's Stroll will run each 
week through Christmas. 



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DcccMbulf, 1995 UIceIanJ Newspapers COMMUNITY 



Antioch ch 

KEVIN HANRAHAN __ 

Staff Reporter 

What do you get when you 
combine 200 pounds of sugar, 
400 eggs, 300 cookies and 50 
pounds of peanuts? 

.Well, with a little creativity 
and imagination! you get the 
largest edible gingerbread castle 
In Lake County. 

The 60-inch culinary master- 
piece has taken center stage In 
the dining room at Condell 
Medical Center in LibertyviUc 
and has attracted a lot of atten- 
tion from both children and 
adults visiting the medical center 
during the holiday season. 

Antioch . resident and 
Condell Food Service Manager 
John Edgcll is the master archi- 
tect, engineer, contractor and 
chef behind the appetizing edi- 
fice. 

"I always liked playing with 
food," said Edgcll, who has 
cooked, baked and built an 
edible gingerbread house 
annually of some sort, size and 
shape at Condell for the last 
seven years. 

"This is just something for me 
to do to break the monotony of 
diets and balanced meals," 
Edgcll said as he picked off a 
piece of candy from one of the 
castle's walls. "It drives the dieti- 
tians in the hospital crazy." 

Although the base of the cas- 
tle is S tyro foam, cookies and cake 
icing serve as the brick and mor- 
tar. Several peaks and towers are 
pitted with peanuts and more 
than 150, inch-thick candy canes 
serve as pillars to hold up the 
500 -pound castle. 

"It usually is just four walls 
and a roof. This year, I decided to 
give people more to look at," said 
Edgell, who usually built ginger- 
bread houses that were generally 
4. feet wide and 2 feet high. This 
one is almost 5.5 feet tall and 6 
feet wide. 

Another added feature this 
year is Santa's workshop incor- 
porated in the center of the cas- 
tle. Through a window, people 

Class teaches 
volunteering 

Volunteering and the respon- 
sibilities of volunteers will be the 
subject of a new one- credit-hour 
course offered by the College of 
Lake County next spring. A day 
section of "Introduction to 
Volunteerism" (EWE 121-001) 
will be offered from noon to 
12:50 p.m. and an evening sec- 
tion (EWE 121-002) from 6 to 6:50 
p.m., both on Mondays at the 
Grayslakc campus. 

Over the 16-week course 
period, students will attend 
class meetings, participate in 
discussions and other activities, 
attend a Volunteer Fair, choose 
a volunteer activity with a social 
service agency or organization 
and volunteer for at least 40 
hours. The course will cover the 
.value of voluntcerisrn to'Trfdi- 
viduals and society, and discus- 
sions will help students develop 
goals for their volunteer activi- 
ties and assess their volunteer 
experiences. 

Interested students must get 
written approval from Constance 
Mcllnay, the coordinator, of 
Cooperative Education, before 
registering for the class. The cost 
of the course is $48, For informa- 
tion, call Mcllnay at 223-6601, 
ext. 2423. 




can view a Santa figure working 
on numerous toys. 

Numerous reindeer arc 
crowded into another window, 
and toy soldiers can be seen In 
other windows. Poinscttias, 
small toys and stuffed animals 
line the base of the castle. 

"You really can't look at It 
without smiling," Edgcll said 
with a broad smile of his own. 
"The adults arc more amazed 
than the kids. It seems they 
never outgrow that Christmas 
spirit" 

Between the buying of ingre- 
dients, baking and cooking, and 
then building, Edgell said it took 
approximately 40 hours to com- 
plete the project. After every- 
thing was baked, he worked all 

T 



through one night to build the 
castle which took about 12 
hours, 

"One day, there is nothing 
here. The next day, it's here. 
Then, it's home for a nap," Edgell 

You really can't 
laok at It without 
smiling/ 

— John Edgell 

said. "It's just something to do for 
the employees and it's been very 
well received." 

After the castle is built, 
Edgcll's work is not complete. 
Me finds himself doing some 
dally patchwork as visitors can- 




castle 



not hold back their temptation 
to pick a piece of candy off the 
castle. 

"I don't mind. Kids will be 
kids, but I know the adults do it 
too," Edgcll joked. 

Condell will leave the castle 
on display in its staff dining room . 
through the holiday season. In 
years past, the gingerbread hous- 
es have been donated to Lambs 
Farm, the La r kin House, and A 
Safe Place. 

"I don't know what they're 
going to do this year. They might 



have difficulty getting it into the 
elevator, and it takes four guys to 
lift it," Edgcll said. 

Condell and Edgcll welcome 
people to visit Lake County's 
largest edible gingerbread castle. 
Edgcll said families come by and 
take pictures together. . 

"It's something nice to view 
during the holidays, and you 
don't have to go to a mall and 
buy something," Edgcll said. 
"Just seeing people's faces and 
their smiles is appreciation 
enough." 





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Antioch resident John Edgell shows off the largest edible ginger- 
bread house In Lake County. The gingerbread castle Is displayed 
at Condell Medical Center's cafeteria.— Photo by Kevin Hanrahan 



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Forefronts 



Lakeland 

NewBpapers 

Lakeland Newspapers' in-depth progress edition, Forefronts, will be published Feb. 9, 1996. We are 
seeking reader input for use in this special section. Please return your comments by Dec. 17 to: 

Forefronts Survey 
Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. You can also fax us at 223-881 or 

Crayslake, IL 60030 E-Mail response to: edit@lnd.com 

1 . Who .is the most influential" person in Lake County? _ 

2. What is the top recreational spot in Lake County? ; — — . 

. 3. Name your favorite Lake County restaurant. _ _ 

4. What is the best night spot in Lake County? — . 

5. Name the worst road in Lake County. 



6. What is your biggest concern about the future of Lake County? 



7. What is the best reason for living in Lake County? 



Town in which you live. 



^m 



.a* 




fl COMMUNITY UktUNd Newspapers DcccMbcii I*, 199? 



m 



Cerrnak 



l ? rom page Al 

Ccrmak recalled as he chuckled. 

From Loon Lake, Ccrmak 
walked to Oakland School, which 
was a one-room schoolhousc at 
the time. 

"I used to walk to school. 
'ITiat's why I have a good heart 
today," Ccrmak said. "It was .a 
one-room schoolhousc. I don't 
understand why they took it 
down. It was a landmark." 

He also remembered his days 
peddling groceries along Loon 
Lake and serving Mass at St. 
...Peter's Church. 

After his schooling, Ccrmak 
enlisted in the U.S. Navy during 
World War II. Me trained at Great 



Lakes Naval Training Center. 
After three years of service he 
earned an honorable discharge 
from the U.S. Naval Hospital in 
Portsmlth, Virginia, in lf)45. 

After that, he was an active 
member of the American Legion. 
He served 35 years at Antioch 
Post 74fl and another 15 years at 
Riviera Beach Post 268. He was 
just honored for 50 years of ser- 
vice with the American Legion. 

During his Antioch days, 
Ccrmak was also an active mem- 
ber of the Moose Lodge, the 
Chamber of Commerce, and the 
Lions Club. Me also served a two- 
year term as president of the 
Lake County Board of Realtors. 



Tardy 



From pagcAl 

radios in which people hit the 
snooze button or fail to get up 
because they did not hear the 
soft music playing. 

These alarm clocks arc 
bulky, toy-like clocks with very 
annoying alarms. One is a duck, 
another has a police car racing 
in a circle, and another is a 
cow. A toy soldier with a bugle 
in hand blares revelry. 

"They are really built for 
children 4 and under, but they 



(high school students) love 
them," said Mullendorc, who 
purchased the clocks at 
Choosey Child specialty shop 
in Antioch. 

Another important feature 
of the clocks is that they don't 
have snooze buttons to tempt a 
slumbering student to push a 
button and roll over for another 
10 minutes. 

"I'm telling the students to 
put the clocks across the room 
so they have to get out of bed to 




Christina Schmidt, a Junior at Antioch High School, Is never late, 
but somo of her classmates are. That's why Christina Is helping 
unpack the humorous alarm clocks.— Photo by Unda Chapman 



Sewer — 



From page A 1 

led by its president Carole Jonit.es, orchestrated the battle for sewer 
service 13 months ago. More than 2,000 residents have lent their sup- 
port behind the study. 

"Without this study, we have no idea of what the costs of such a 
project might be or if the area can-even be considered for such an enor- 
mous undertaking," Jonitcs said. 

Jonites and the UHAUA has argued that the quality of life on the 
Chain O' Lakes is threatened by aging and failing septic systems. 
Jonitcs said the septic systems were originally designed to handle 
sewage for seasonal residents living in summer cottages. 

But times have changed and people now live here year-round, 
Jonitcs said. 

"In my subdivision alone approximately 90 percent of the people 
are year-round residents," Jonites said. "As a result of this year-round 
use, many of these systems are failing." 

She said heavy rains and spring thaws carry contaminated water 
from septic fields to more than 20 lakes in the area. She also fears that 
the groundwater may become contaminated. Unincorporated resi- 
dents draw their drinking water from underground wells as opposed to 
Lake Michigan. 

"There Is no other area in all of Lake County more in need of sani- 
tary sewers," said Jonites, who was quoting a statement by an official 
from the Department of Environmental Health. 

Martini said the study is expected to take approximately 10 weeks, 
and residents will have figures and cost estimates shortly thereafter.' 
Residents then will have input as to whether sewer service is feasible 
and affordable to them. 

"Through this study my constituents will know the true cost of 
bringing sewers to them," Martini said. "And they will have all the 
facts, so that they can decide if the price is right to help save the lakes 
and their property investments." 



Before embarking on a real 
estate career, Ccrmak worked for 
Elmer Brook, who was related to 
Bill Brook, founder of the Antioch 
State Bank (now the State Bank of 
the Lakes). 

He then took a risk and gave 
real estate a try when Antioch 
was still a resort community and 
before the housing boom. 

"I never realized that it would 
be that bad without a house for 
sale," Cermak said, "but I worked 
hard at it and it all turned out 
okay." 

Ccrmak even used a 25-foot 
boat to show lakcfront homes 
along the Chain O' Lakes to 
potential buyers. 



"It worked out very well. Of 
course, I had a lot of fun, too," 
Ccrmak said. 

His real estate business was 
how he met his wife, Mitzl. 

"She owned a beauty salon in 
Chicago and was looking for a job 
up here," Ccrmak said. T hired 
her right away. I figured if she can 
take care of the ladies, she can 
sell real estate." 

They raised six children, 
including triplets— Joe, Ann and 
Mary. The other threesome 
includes Chuck, Jim and 
Charlcnc. All still live and work in 
the Antioch region. He also 
boasts 10 grandchildren and 
numerous great-grandchildren. 



Each summer, Cermak 
returns to Antioch to visit family 
and friends. 

"I enjoy coming back. I missj 
my old friends," Cermak said.; 
"They come up to me and say, 
'Hey Charlie, I still have that; 
house you sold me.'" 

Family and friends also find; 
their way down to Florida to visit; 
Ccrmak. 

."When they visit, I tell them 
only three days," he joked. 

Ccrmak may be living in sunny. 
Florida, but he said his heart still 
remains in Antioch. In fact,. 
Ccrmak drives through Florida in 
his Ford Lincoln with license 
plates that read "Antioch." 



turn the alarms off," 
Mullendorc noted. 

Operation alarm clock also 



She said the program has 
been successful. Since getting 
the alarm clocks, none of the 



% One more tardy and they would be recom- 
mended for expulsion. We don't want to do 

that so this is their last chance, ' 

—Principal Susan Mullendore 



involves parents. Mullendorc 
said both the student and par- 
ents were invited to a special 
meeting with her to explain the 
severity and consequences of 
the chronic tardes. 

Parents arc encouraged to 
share breakfast with their chil- 
dren before they go off to work. 

"We are asking parents to 
have breakfast with their kids," 
Mullendorc said. 



students have been tardy. 

"They're haying amazing 
success in getting here on time. 
These little babies have helped 
us a lot," said Mullendorc, 



referring to the alarm clocks. 
"It's a cheap Investment to 
help four kids get to school on 
time, otherwise they would be 
expelled." 

Mullendorc did warn that 
there is still two more weeks 
before the semester ends. 

"If those four kids finish the 
semester, that's, more than 
those four kids have done in 
the past," Mullendorc said. 
"These kids arc getting to 
school on time . . . Knock on 
wood." 



223-8161 



Lakeland 

Ncwspapcra 



1 



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...With a subscription to 
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Dccuabcft 15, 1995 LaIceIancI Newspapers COMMUNITY 





THISWEEK 

Hall of Fame 
sighting 

Crowd battles weather 



to meet idol 
PAGEC19 



• - 



•' ; 



Mother 
knows best 

Warren grad swims 
forSIU PACE CI 9 

For More 
SpoRTs/LeisiiRE 
SEEP/\qEC19 



Cold weather 
chills Antioch 
shooting hands 

The shots arc from the 
same spots on the Door that 
Antioch boys were taking the 
first five games. 

Out in the last two, the 
old line about the basket 
shrinking rang true as 
Antioch dropped a 47-44 
decision at Stevenson and a 
48-37 loss to Lake Forest 

"They were good shots, 
but they are not going in the ' 
hole," Antioch Coach Jeff 
Dresser said. 

The Scquoits, on the 
bright side, played good 
defense both games. Dresser 
said. This will come in 
handy when the Sequoits (4- 
3, 1-2 NSC) are at 
Mundelcin in a 7:30 p.m. 
clash Dec. 15. 

Justin McRae was scored 
U points to lead Antioch in 
the game at Stevenson. The 
game was not decided until 
Dan Brown gave the Pats the 
lead and the home team 
made late free-throws. Kevin 
Eckcnstahler had eight . 
points and helped Antioch's 
cause in the final two min- 
utes. 

Antioch could muster 
only 16 second-half points 
against Lake Forest The 
Scouts pulled away with a 14- 
7 second quarter run. 

"Lake Forest is for real 
with their two big kids. Ed 
Cage is an outstanding play- 
er," Dresser said. 

The Scquoits, host St. 

Edward of Elgin Dec 19. 

LilNICiENkuRST PolicE 

BAskETbAll Leaque 






Team 


W 


L 


Pis. 


KiwiinisCiub 


4 





274 


Eagle Country Mkt. 


3 


1 


200 


LV. Twp. Lions Club 


2 


1 


.175 


McDonald's 


2 


1 


169 


Undenfcst, Inc. 


2 


r, 


, 161 


Anderson Tile 


2 


i 


135 


Aristocrat Shoe 








.Repair . 


1 


3 


207 


Jacobsen Excavating 





2 


103 


North Star Travel 





3 


156 


Lindcnhurst Travel 





3 


fi6 



Results of Dec. 1 

Kiwanls Club 69, McDonald's 36 

Eagle Country Market 47, Aristocrat 

Shoe Repair 4G 

Lfndenfesl, Inc. 59, Anderson Tile 55 

LV.Twp. Lions Club 74, Lindcnhurst 

Travel 24 

nyc— jacobsen Excavating and North 

Star Travel 



Traveling softball team tryouts slated for January 



The Lindcnhurst fast pitch softball program 
and the Lindcnhurst Park District will be con- 
ducting open tryouts for girls interested in 
participating in the 1996 traveling softball sea- 
son. 

These teams play by ASA rules in an approx- 
imately 40-gamc schedule. '. 

Tryouts will be held, on Sunday, Jan. 14, at 
the M illou rn School gym In Wadsworth. There 
will be a $10 tryout fee to cover expenses. 

Tryout times for the four age groups arc: 
12 and under (Magic) 2-4 p.m.; 14 and 
under (Bullets) 2-4 p.m.; 16 and under 
(Raiders) 4-6 p.m.; and 18 and under (Legend) 



4-6 p.m. 

, Age bracket cut-off is determined by a Sept. 
1 birth date. For example, a current 14-year- 
old player turning 15 before Sept 1 must play 
on the 16 and under team, while a player turn- 
ing 15 after Sept 1 would play on the 14 and 
under team. 

Players trying out will be evaluated in the 
fundamentals' of throwing, catching, fielding, 
hitting and pitching. Each player must wear 
gym shoes and athletic wear and bring their 
own softball glove. 

- These indoor tryouts will be conducted with 
the use of Softee Safety Balls. Parents will be 



required to sign a liability waiver. 

These traveling teams play against commu- 
nities throughout Lake County, as well as in 
tournaments in Rockford, McHcnry, the Quad 
Cities, Burbank, Blue Island and Wisconsin. 

Teams arc limited to 15 players, who will be 
notified within a week of tryouts and will be 
expected to start practicing immediately. 

There is a $150 participation fee for the 
summer season. 

Those with questions about the program or 
tryouts should contact cither of the program 
directors: Mitch Kotlarz, 356-9547; or Steve 
Haenchcn, 356-8813. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



O'Connell shines as ACHS girls upend Lake Forest 



Erin O'Connell picked a good 
day to have a career game. 

The Antioch senior scored 21 
points and had eight rebounds .as 
Antioch downed Lake Forest 40-31. 

"She stepped up and re- 
sponded to the challenge and 
had a great game." Antioch 
Coach Dave Woods said. 

O'Connell had eight re- 
bounds and as many fourth- 
quarter points as Antioch 
outscorcd the Scouts 15-7 in the 
final stanza. 

"You expect, that from se- 
niors," Woods said of the, late? 
game heroics. 

.The win is the first in North. 

Senior leaders 
lead grapplers 
in fast start 

Two senior leaders arc show- 
ing the way as Antioch's 
wrestling squad started the sea- 
son with two league wins, a sec- 
ond place and a third place at 
tournaments. 

Both Matt Hlinak at 119 
pounds and Luke Dyer at 125 arc 
fl-1 before a Dec 14 clash with 
Lake Forest The two were among 
four champions as Antioch fin- 
ished second at the prestigious 
Buffalo Grove meet with 167.5 
points. 

"Each time I put Hlinak and 
Dyer on the mat, I expect a vic- 
tory. They arc right up there in 
the top class. They both wrestled 
a lot in the summertime and arc 
so self- motivated, work hard and 
are disciplined," Antioch Coach 
Ted Sicckowski said. 

Also earning titles at Buffalo 
drove were Jeremy Helton at 135 
andJcffUltesatl52. 

Steve Brccn earned a second 
place at 160 and the Scquoits had 
two third-place finishes in ending 
second to Lyons. 

Antioch downed Stevenson 
43-21 in a NSC match Friday. 
Hlinak won by technical fall and 
Dyer won by major decision. 
Mike Burian, a junior, earned a 
pin at 140 pounds. 

"We're ahead of schedule. 1 
thought we would be re- 
spectable. Most kids are improv- 
ing every match and have made 
marked improvement," 

Sicckowski said. 

Pre-Christmas matches in- 
clude "an away meet at Johnsburg 
Dec, 19 and hosting Grayslake 
Dec. 20. 



Suburban Conference play for 
Antioch, which improved to 6-4 
overall. 

"We played excellent defense. 
The key was we were able to dic- 
tate the pace with our offense. We 
would take 35 to 40 seconds off 
the clock before shooting and 
that did not give them much time 



to shoot and we played good 
defense," Woods said. 

The game was a nip-and-tuck 
clash on Saturday as the Scquoits 
held a one-point lead with two 
minutes left. O'Connell came 
through as she put home a 
missed free throw for a three- 
point lead. Antioch made five 



fourth quarter free throws to ice 
the win. 

Antioch, after battling 
Mundelein Tuesday in NSC ac- 
tion, faced Crystal Lake Cent 
at home Dec. 14. Next is a batdi 
with Grayslake Dec. 21 
McHenry tournament in a 5:: 
p.m. game. 




—-« 



Antioch's Erin O'Connell shows nor Jump shot form In action against Stevenson's Carolyn Roth In a 
North Suburban Conference contest. She scored over half the Sequolt points In a 40-31 win over Lake 
Forest. — Photo by Steve Young 



COMMUNITY LaIceUncI NewspApEKS Dtctmbt* IE, 1995 



NO G1IVII 

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save 50' ffi 

Sweaters. Beautiful styles. 
Reg. S24-S72. sale $12-536 
Maternity sweaters. ..sale $16-$19 



to*-* 



10% 

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Sonoma, 16.99 
Lee, 19.99 
Levi's, 27.99 

SONOMA 






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18T99 & 24.99 16.99-27.99 16.99 & 19.99 sale 26.99 



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Screen-printed & appllqued 
fleece tops. Reg. 29.99 & 39.99 



Misses' and petlles' Sonoma & Juniors' Sonoma and all Lee* 
Lee* & misses' Levi's* denim jeans, denim Jeans. Reg. 24.00-32.99 



OFF STOCK 

Jns.' Levi's* denim jeans. Stonewash, Fine & bridge jewelry and watches 
Bleach & Black finishes. Reg. 39.99 sate priced at 25-60% off. Reg. 9.99- 



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STOCK 



save 50 s s 



sale 99,99 



Men's Bugle Boy' long-sleeved Men's screen-prints \ embroidered Men's parkas & nylon ski jackets Holiday kitchen textiles. A large Flannel sheet sets. Winterbay* Save 55% on a Black & Decker* 
sport shirts. Styles vary, $10-51 8 novelty lleece. A wide variety of from Field & Stream and Pacific selection of festive styles & colors. Springmaid* and Martex*. Patterns 15Mb. breadmaker, 13-hour timer 
Bugle Bof 705 & 750 jeans. .14. 89 screens. Reg. S28-S4 8. sale $14-524 Trail. Reg. S80-S150, sale $40-$75 Reg. 1.49-16.99, sale .74-8.49 vary. 24.99-64.99, sale 12.49-32.49 and six bread settings. Reg. 199.99 



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•25-50% OFF ALL MISSES' SEPARATE TOPS 
& SWEATERS Reg. $9-562, sale 6.75-43.40 . 
•40-50% OFF MISSES' NOVELTY FLEECE TOPS sale S12S16 
•40-50% OFF MISSES'; PETITES' & PLUS-SIZE SONOMA 
AND LEE AUTHENTIC TOPS Reg. S16-S40. sale 9.60-24.00 
•30-50% OFF MISSES' BLAZERS, SKIRTS & PANTS, 16.99-34.00 
•25-50% OFF MISSES' CASUAL PANTS sale 14.99-22.40 
•30-50% OFF ALL MISSES' COORDINATES sale 13.00-45.60 
•30-50% OFF ENTIRE STOCK MISSES' RELATED 
WEEKEND WEAR Reg. S20-S44. sale $14-$22 
•50% OFF MISSES' All NYLON OR SILK JOG SETS sale 27.49-29.99 
•SAVE 40% ON FITNESS WEAR FOR HER sale 8.39-21.60 
•30-50% OFF PETITES' SPORTSWEAR sale 8.99-45.60 



EVERYTHING 

•SAVE 25-50% ON ENTIRE STOCK PLUS-SIZE SPORTSWEAR 

Reg. 12.99-76.00. sale 8.99-45,60 
•30-50% OFF ALL MISSES' AND JUNIORS' DRESSES 

Reg. 39.99-89.99. sale 27.99-62.99 , 
•40-50% OFF WINTER OUTERWEAR FOR HER sale 35.99-107.99 
•SAVE 40-50% ON ALL JUNIORS' SWEATERS, TURTLENECKS 

& FLANNEL SKIRTS sale 4.99-20.99 
•30-50% OFF ALL JRS.' B.U.M.*. PALMETTO'S* LN.U.F*. 

ARCTIC & HOLIDAY FLEECE 516-546, sale 11.20-32.20 
•SAVE 30-50% ON ENTIRE STOCK JUNIORS' SKIRTS & 

PANTS Reg. 11.99-34.99. sale 5.99-24.50 
•25-30% OFF ALL JRS.' DENIM JEANS sale 17.99-32.99 
•60% OFF ALL 14k GOLD CHAINS & BRACELETS sale S20-S320 

•1-cl. T.W. diamond tennis bracelets, sale 109.99 



FOR HER 

•2-cl. T.W. DIAMOND TENNIS BRACELETS, sale 499.99 
•33% 0FFTIMEX WATCHES sale 12.69-43.51 

•25-50% oft-all other watches, salit 9.79-318.75 
•50% OFF HOLIDAY MOTIF JEWELRY sale 1.99-12.50 

•25-50% oil other fashion & name-brand Jewelry, 2.39-45.00 
•20% OFF FINE FRAGRANCES sale 7.99-43.20 

•40% oil Trellis, Tapestry, Neutrogena gift sets, $6-515 
•40% OFF BED BUDDY 9.99-24.99, sale 5.99-14.99 

•40% off decorative perfume bottles. $20-530. sale $12-518 
•33% OFF ALL HANDBAGS AND PURSE 

ACCESSORIES Reg. $9-565, sale 6.03-43.55 
•11.99 SUEDE & JERSEY GLOVES Reg. 519-520 

•33% off other leather gloves. 19.99-35.00. sale 13.39-23.45 

•25-50% oil other cold-wBather knitwear, sale 1.75-26.60 




•50% OFF WARM-UP BOOTS & KIDS' SUPPERS sale 3.99-11.00 
•40% off fashion hats & hair accessories, sale 1.80-18.00 

•50% OFF REGULAR-PRICED TEBRY & CHENILLE ROBES 
Reg. 39.99-49.99. sale 19.99-24.99 
•33-40% off regular-priced sleepwear, robes, loungewear 
and dusters. Reg. 14.99-49.99, sale 10.04-29.99 

•SAVE 40% ON WINTER SLEEPWEAR, ROBES, 
LOUNGEWEAR AND DUSTERS now 7.70-23.90 

•40% OFF BALI*, WARNER'S* & VANITY FAIR BRAS, 
PANTIES AND DAYWEAR sate 2.70-15.90 
•30% oft the One and Only Wonderbra", sale 1B.20 
•33% oft selected Olga*. Maldentorm*. Playtex*, Bestform* 
& Flexeos foundations. Reg. 5.99-41.00. sate 4.01-27.47 

♦40% OFF SONOMA SOCKS FOR HER sale 1.50-4.50 



•40% OFF YOUNG MEN'S LEVI'S* CLASSIC CREW FLEECE sale 20.40 

•40% all young men's Sonoma twill shirts, 532, sale 19.20 

•50% off young men's Lee* turllenecks. $20. sale $10 
•19.99 LEVI'S* PREWASHEO INDIGO JEANS 

•Men's Lee Prewashed leans, sale 16.99 
•23.99 MEN'S LEVI'S* 505* & 550' NEW AGE 

BLEACH AND NEW 8LEACH JEANS 

•30-50% otf all men's famous-maker jeans, sale 14.49-22.99 
•40% ON MEN'S BUGLE BOY' ARCTIC FLEECE sale $18-530 
•40% OFF MEN'S M SPORT* WINDWEAR SEPARATES 

AND JOG SETS Reg. 518-550, sale 10.80-30.00 
•20-25% OFF MEN'S NAME-BRAND CRUISEWEAR 

Reg. 9.99-34.00, sate 7.99-25.50 
•MEN'S CROFT & BARHOW* PINPOINT DRESS SHIRTS 

Available in solid colors. Reg. 29.99, sate 19.99 



FOR IVIEN AND KIDS 



•30% oil holiday neckwear, sate 8.40-19.60 

•50% ollboied He & suspender sets. Reg. SI 8, sale 59 
•SAVE 40% ON MEN'S SELECTEQ KNIT AND . 

WOVEN SPORT SHIRTS $18-540, sale 10.80-24.00 

•9.99 Men's tlannel shirts. Warm styles. Reg. 316 
•30% OFF LEVI'S* DRESS AND CROFT & 

BARROW* CASUAL PANTS sale 22.40-26.60 
•25% OFF HAGGAR' DRESS SLACKS sale 26.25-37.50 

•25% off Lee* & Bugle Boy* cotton casual slacks, 18.74-28.50 
•40% OFF ALL MEN'S OUTERWEAR sate 548-5195 
•35% OFF MEN'S FLANNEL PJS sale 13.00 

•30% olf entire stock ol men's robes, safe 15.39-42.00 . 
•25% OFF ALL MEN'S BELTS A WALLETS, sale 5.99-18.75 

•25% otl Croft & Barrow* hosiery, sale 1.71-5.24 . 

•30% otl Christmas hosiery & boxers, sale 3.49-11.89 



•ALL MEN'S PLAYERS' ATHLETIC SOCKS, sale 3.69-6.99 
•50% OFF TODDLERS'-GIRLS' 14 AND BOYS' 4-20 SWEATERS 

Reg. 8.99-29.99, sale 4.49-14.99 

•50% off boys' 8-20 selected woven tops, sale 8.99-14.99 
•40-50% OFF NEWBORNS'-GIRLS' 16 AND B0YS> 8-20 

FLEECE TOPS, BOTTOMS & SETS 6.99-41.99, sate 3.49-25.19 
•40% OFF NEWBORNS'-GIRLS' 16 & BOYS' 4-20 SELECTED 

NAME-BRAND APPAREL Reg. 7.99-39.99, sate 5.39-23.99 
•40% OFF KIDS' SLEEPWEAR sale 4,19-15.59 
•50% OFF NEWBORNS'-GIRLS' 4-16 AND BOYS' 4-20 WINTER 

OUTERWEAR & SNOWWEAR 11.99-99.99, sale 5.99-49.99 
•SAVE 50% ON KNITWEAR & BACKPACKS FOR BOYS & 

GIRLS Reg. 1.79-31.99, sale .89-15.99 



•14,99 BOYS' 8-20 BUGLE BOY' 750 DENIM JEANS Reg. 19.99 

•14.99 GIRLS' 4-6X LEE JEANS Reg. 23.99 

•15.99 BOYS' 4-7 LEVI'S' JEANS Reg. 24.99 

•30% OFF INFANTS' ACCESSORIES A large selection • 

for your little ones. Reg. .89-59.99. sale .62-41.99 
•40% OFF INFANTS' & TODDLERS' BASICS Layette. 

sleepwear & blanket sleepers. 2.99-21.99, sale 1.79-13.19 

•50% oft 100% cotton playwear. Reg. 

11.99-19.99, sale 5.99-9.99 

Pijywtar not intended as sleepwear. 

•20-50% OFF TOYS Reg. .59-119.99, sale .44-85.99 

•50% OFF PLUSH TOYS 2.99-99.99, sate 1.49-49.99 

'Kermir holiday pluih, 12.49 with any $30 purchaie, 



HERE ARE A FEW MORE REASONS TO SHOP WITH US! 

EXTENDED SHOPPING HOURS gift certificates 

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 
Kohl's will be open Saturday, December 16, 7am-Midnight 



THE GIRT. THAT ALWAYS FITS 
Certificates In denominations of $5-$ 100 
.are always available at the Service Desk. 



***.'».•*/-■' Six*: 



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DeccMbiit 15, 199? LaIceIancI Newspapers COMMUNITY 










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Leather tiandtiagt & wallets-on- Playtex* bras. Eighteen Hour, 
a-string. A targe variety of styles. Thank Goodness It RIs". Cross 
Reg. S1 5-S65, sale 7.50-32.50 Your Heart*, more. Reg. $1 3-S25 



i 



BOYS' 8-14 & 
GIRLS' 7-16 LEVI'S 1 

Reg. 25.99-27.99 

Students' 550' & 560" leans, 2436 Newborns', infants', toddlers', 
8-14 & 7-16 Lee* leans, sale 14.99 girls' 4-16 and boys' 4-20 name- 
Students' Lee* jeans, sale 16.99 brand apparel, sale 3.99-16.49 



\% ENTIRE 




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Mr? 





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Flsher-Prlce*. Playskool* & Little Men's Haggar* and Crolt & Barrow* 

Tikes" toys. Great gifts for kids! lancy dress shirts. Several styles & 

Reg. 1.99-79.99, sale 1.29-51.99 colors. 24.99-36.00. sale 12.49-18.00 

Raabdh 




■ 



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sale 3.99 

3K-gallon popcorn tins. 
Caramel, cheese & butter flavors, 
Limit 10 per customer. Reg. 9.99 



ENTIRE 
STOCK 



sale 3.99 sale 24.99 sale 34.99 




|% ENTIRE 
STOCK 



Cfeo* brand gift wrap. Jumbo and Mini video casino game. Choose Save $20 on women's Reebok* 
multi-pack rolls in several sizes & Poker, Deuces, Blackjack and Slot. Monaco athletic shoes. Classic 
designs. Reg. .99-7.99. sale .49-3.99 Great stocking stuffersl Reg. 12.99 styling and comfort. Reg. 44.99 



Men's or. women's Reebok* 
Comfort Ultra athletic shoes. 
In white or black. Reg. 59.99 



Adults' team-lfcensed outerwear. 
A winning gift! Teams vary by store. 
Reg. 99.99-124.99, sale 49.99-62.49 







ElfEDVTUIkir IN SHOES, ATHLETIC 
[VtKllnlmi APPAREL & ELECTRONICS 



20-50% OFF ALL MEN'S, WOMEN'S & KIDS' ATHLETIC, 
DRESS & CASUAL SHOES & BOOTS Re . 14.99-140.00. sale 11.99-59.99 

25-50% OFF ALL ADULTS' TEAM & NAME-BRAND ATHLETIC 
APPAREL, OUTERWEAR & ACCESSORIES 

Teams and styles vary. Reg. 3.49-124.99, sale 2.44-83.74 



EVERYTHING 



15-70% OFF ENTIRE STOCK ELECTRONICS 

•20-40% tilt all phones & answering machines 
•20-40% oft all stereos and radios 
•20-40% oil all blank tapes & lape/cd storage 
•15-70% off all kids' & exercise videos & calculators 
•15-30% off all electric shavers & hair trimmers 
•20-50% off all pagers, computer software & access. 
•25-40% off all kids' electronics 
•15*30% off all batteries and accessories 
Reg. .99-299.99, sale .84-254.99 
Pagers not at all stores. 



50% OFF ALL VIDEO 
GAME SOFTWARE 

Sega* Genesis* • Super Nintendo* 
Sega* Game Gear •Nintendo 9 Game Boy 9 
Virtual Boy" *Sony* PlayStation" 

Reg. 24.99-74.99. safe 12.49-37.49 
HURRY IN FOR THE BEST SELECTION! 

In stock merchandise only. No rainchecks. 

Sorry, no price adjustments given on prior purchases. 



FOR YOUR HOME 



•15-50% OFF ENTIRE STOCK OF SMALL ELECTRICS AND 

ACCESSORIES • PERSONAL CARE • AIR CLEANERS 

HUMIDIFIERS • VACUUMS 1.99-399.99, sals 1.59-297.49 
•25-50% OFF ALL BREADMAKERS & 

ACCESSORIES 2.99-399.99. sate 1,49-279.99 
•20-60% OFF ALL OPEN STOCK COOKWARE, BAKEWARE & 

ACCESSORIES Reg. 16.99-t52.99, sale 9.99-122.39 
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WARE* OPEN STOCK Reg. 3.39-52.99, sale 2.37-38.99 
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GADGETS 1.49-159.99, sale 1.04-99.99 
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PHOTO ALBUMS Reg. .79-46.99, sals .47-28.19 
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•33% OFF ALL GOURMET FOOD GIFTS sale 4.01-20.09 



•40-50% OFF ALL ST. NICHOLAS SQUARE* BRAND 

TRIM-A-TREE Reg. .99-59.99. sale .49-35.19 
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Reg. .79-39.99, sale .52-19.99 
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Reg. 15.99-24.99, sale 7.99-12.49 
•SAVE 25-40% ON ENTIRE STOCK OF TABLEWARE 

Reg. 4,75-124.99. sale 3.56-93.74 
•30-50% OFF ENTIRE STOCK DECORATIVE GIFTWARE 

Reg. 5.69-60.00, sale 2.84-42.00 
-SAVE 25-50% ON ENTIRE STOCK OF SOLID & PRINT 
, SHEETS ANO SHEET SETS Waterbed and kids' styles from 

many lamous-makers. Reg. 5.99-99.99, sale 4.49-74.99 
•SAVE 33% ON ENTIRE STOCK OF 

COMFORTERS AND ACCESSORIES 

Reg. 14.99-299.99, sale 10.04-200.99 
•SAVE 40% ON ALL DOWN COMFORTERS 

Styles vary. Reg. 109.99-349.99, sale 65.99-209.99 

•4U% off comforter covers & shams, sals 8.99-47.99 



•40% OFF ALL BLANKETS AND THROWS 

Reg. 15.99-149.99, sale 9.59-B9.99 
•50% OFF BILL BLASS" SHEETS Includes solids, stripes & 

plaids. Reg. 9.99-29.99, sale 4.99-14.99 
•50% OFF ALL BED PILLOWS, MATTRESS PADS 

& ACCESSORIES 1.29-79.99, sale .64-39.99 
•50% OFF ALL HANDMADE QUILTS AND SHAMS 
. Reg. 24.99-99.99. sale 12.49-49.99 

•33% off Battenburg & eyelet accessories, sals 8.70-30.14 
•SAVE 40-50% ON ENTIRE STOCK OF BATH TOWELS . 

Includes bath & hand towels and washcloths; plus a variety 

of kids' styles, jacquards, prints, solids & embellished 

designs. 2.99-22.99. sals 1.49-11.99 
•SAVE 40-50% ON ENTIRE STOCK OF BATH ACCESSORIES 

Plastics, ceramics, scales, rugs & shower curtains. 

Reg. 1.99-99.99, sale 1.19-59.99 
•40-50% OFF ENTIRE STOCK ACCENT RUGS 

Reg. 8.99-169.99, sale 5.39-101.99 



•30-50% OFF ALL HOLIDAY & EVERYDAY DECORATOR 

PILLOWS & CHAIR PADS Reg. 5.99-34.99. sale 3.59-24.49 
•SAVE 33-50% ON ENTIRE STOCK HOLIDAY AND 

EVERYDAY TABLE LINENS & KfTCHEN TEXTILES 

Reg. .99-59.99, sale .66-40.19 
•SAVE 50% ON HOME CLASSICS* MINI BLINDS 

ANO ALL VERTICAL BLINDS 

Reg. 6.99-1 19.99. sale 3.49-59.99 
•SAVE 35-50% ON WINDOW COVERINGS AND FURNITURE 

SLIPCOVERS Give your home a new look. Reg. 11.99- 

149.99. sale 7.79-97.49 
•SAVE 40-50% ON ALL LUGGAGE 

Reg. 29.99-339.99.sale 17.99-169.99 

•30-50% oft all business cases, tolas and duffels. 

Reg. 7.99-100.00,sale 5.59-66.99 




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COMMUNITY LaIceIancI Newspapers DcceMben 15, 199 5 



First Chicago sponsors food drive 



The First National Bank of 
Chicago's Antioch branch at 425 
Lake St is sponsoring a food 
drive during the month of 
December. 

A drop-box will be in the 
bank lobby for non-perishable 
food items. Collected items will 
benefit The Antioch Community 
Food Pantry, a not-for-profit 
organization serving the Lake 
Villa and Antioch communities. 

"This is the third year we've 
participated in this special pro- 
gram. Many underprivileged 
people often do not have food on 
their tables during this special 
time of year," said Jeff Mulder, 
president of First Chicago's 
Antioch branch. "We welcome 



our friends and neighbors In the 
community to join us in donating 
to this worthy cause.'* 

The Antioch Community 
Food Pantry also encourages 
underprivileged families to drop 
off a list of food items at their 
office in the United Methodist 
Church, 848 Main St. Qualified 
recipients arc contacted and 
asked to drop by the pantry every 
five weeks for supplemental food 
items such as cereal, peanut but- 
ter, fruit and vegetables. 

"We never turn a needy fam- 
ily away," said Barbara 
Goctzelman, coordinator of the 
food pantry. "If the family Is a 
resident of another community, 
we fill their order and provide 



them with telephone numbers of 
organizations like ours in their 
own community." 

Since the program's incep- 
tion 1 1 years ago, the church has 
served over 300 needy families in 
the Lake Villa and Aritioch 
Township. For Information 
about The Antioch Community 
Food Pantry or to donate, call 
395-1259. 

The First National Dank of 
Chicago is a subsidiary of First 
Chicago NDD, the nation's sixth 
largest bank holding company 
with assets of approximately 
$124 billion. It is the nation's 
number one provider of banking 
products and services in the 
Midwest. 



Carmel Illinois State Scholars named 



Forty-six students from Carmel High School, 
Mundclcin, have been named Illinois State 
Scholars. This represents 18 percent of the senior 
class at Carmel. 

Although program participation by high 
schools is voluntary, nearly all participate and 
Illinois' to students elect to have test scores and 
high school class ranks sent to the Illinois Student 
Assistance Commission for consideration in the 
popular program. About 10 percent of Illinois' high 
school seniors arc designated State Scholars and 
receive a Certificate of Achievement for the accom- 
plishment. 

In order to enter the competition, high school 
students must take the ACT and/or SAT I college 
entrance examination between Sept. 1 and June 30 
of their junior year of high school and have the 
scores sent to ISAC. Generally, selection of Scholars 
is based on a combination of their test scores and 
their class rank at the end of the junior year. Carmel 
students are: 

Peter Braido, Island Lake; Elizabeth 
Buckingham, libcrtyvUle; Andrew Burke, Island 
l,akc; Matthew Burke, Lake Zurich; Otis Carter, 
Cumee; Lucas Chorazy, Barrington; Carrie Cohen, 



Lake Villa; Adricnnc Cuttcn, Mundclcin; Carmclla 
D'Incognito, Mundclcin; Ajay Easo, Wadsworth. 

Lisa Gadwood, Lake Zurich; Joe George, 
Gurncc; Michelle Gricus, Wauconda; Beth 
Harrington, Waukegan; Ansaric Harris, Mundelein; 
Heidi Herchenbach, Libertyvillc; Erin Jennings, 
Gurncc; Ryan Johnson, Long Grove; Kathleen 
Kalista, Libcrtyville; Marguerite Kaspcrczyk, Green 
Oaks.. 

Benjamin Kcsslng, Gurncc; Bryan Knight, 
Libertyvillc; Colleen Krombach, Grayslakc; James 
Kwiatt, Vernon Hills; Leah Lazarus, Lake Zurich; 
Brian Lcider, Lake Villa; Zachary Malloy, 
Mundclcin; Peggy McCaulcy, Libertyvillc; Dawn 
McCullom, Great Likes; Kevin Mclntyre, Inglcisdc. 

Michael Nordeen, Waukegan; Kevin O'Lcary, 
Barrington; John Pay] us, Libertyvillc; Jessica 
Philpott, Mundelein; Jaclyn Pokryfke, Lake Zurich; 
Kathryn Reyes, Buffalo Grove; Erin Ryan,"Antioch; 
Erin Samolis, Lake. Zurich; Thomas Sonz.a-Noycra, 
Mundclcin; Jaclyn Stanula, Fox Lake. 

Gillian Sumners, Waukegan; Gloria Trainor, 
Grayslakc; Robert Tschanz, Libertyvillc; Kristcn 
Vaitonis, Round Lake Beach; Matthew Walter, 
Grayslakc; Brian Westcrman, Libertyvillc. 



Nominate someone to carry Olympic flame 



There is still time to nominate yourself or another 
individual to carry the Olympic flame in next year's 
Olympic Torch Relay. In response to requests for addi- 
tional time to complete nominations, the deadline has 
been extended an additional two weeks for people to 
apply to become an Olympic torchbearcr. Entry forms 
must be postmarked by Dec. 15. 

"We want to ensure that people who are interest- 
ed in carrying the Olympic (lame have ample oppor- 
tunity to participate in this oncc-in-a-lifctimc 
event," said Doug Weber, president of United Way, 
of Lake County. "This is a very exciting event for us, 
as the Olympic flame will pass through Lake County 
on June 3 of next year. It will travel by train from 



Milwaukee to Chicago, and there is a 10-minutc 
whistle stop planned for Waukegan." Lake County 
residents selected to carry the Olympic torch will 
participate before it arrives in Milwaukee or after it 
leaves Chicago. 

The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games 
(ACOG) is seeking 5,500 people whose service to 
others and meaningful contributions to their com- 
munity shed light into the lives of many Americans. 
Individuals selected as torchbearers will be notified 
in February. 

To nominate yourself or someone else to carry 
the Olympic flame, contact United Way of Lake 
County at 816-0063. 



Clerk plans campaign disclosure seminar 



Lake County Clerk Willard 
Ilelandcr announced that a 
workshop will be held at 10 a.m. 
on Saturday, Jan. 13, at the 
Libcrtyville Twp. Office, 359 
Merrill Court, Libertyvillc, to 
inform candidates, political 
committees and interested citi- 
zens about filing obligations 
under the Illinois Campaign 
Disclosure Act. 

The workshop will be con- 
ducted by State Board of Elec- 
tions officials and will focus on 
reporting requirements for the 
March Primary and November 
General elections. It will last ap- 
proximately two hours. Experts 
will provide a stcp-by-step ex- 
planation of how to complete 
the reporting forms and will be 
available -to answer specific 
questions. ; 

Each political party must file 
a statement of organization 
within 30 days of creation. Semi- 
annual reports must be filed 
twice a year and Pre- Elec- 
tion/Non-Participation reports 



must be filed 15 days before 
each election. 

"Our objective is to provide 
the necessary tools to permit po- 
litical organizations to fulfill 
their obligations under Illinois 
law," Ilelandcr said. 

Anyone desiring information 
or having questions about elec- 



tion procedures should attend 
this workshop. For further in- 
formation, contact Daphne 
Dcadrick at 360-5926. 



RECYCLE 






PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF MEETING 

Nolico Is hereby gtvon thai a mooting will bo hold by The Board ol Ubrary 
Trustees ot the Lako Villa Public Lfcrary District. Lake County, Illinois (Iho 
■ObWsf), on Ihe 1 5th day ot January, 1996, al 7:00 P.M., at the Lako Villa District 
Library, 1001 East Grand Avenuo, Lako Villa, Illinois, tor the purpose ot deter- 
mining the llnanclng In connection wtth building an addition to tho oxistlng Ibrary 
building ot the District known as the Lake Villa District Ubrary (the "Lbmy 
Building"), repairing, remodeling and Improving tho Library Building, furnishing 
nocossary equipment thorotor and acquiring library materials (such as books, 
periodicals, films and recordings) and electronic data storage and retrieval fadll- 
tlos (collectively, Iho Ttnuy Project)', at the site of tho Ubrary Building, which Is 
located at 1001 East Grand Avenue, Lake Villa, Illinois, ft Is estimated that the 
Library Project will cost $4,750,000 and that said amount shall bo raised by tho 
issuance ot genera) obligation bonds ot the District, which bonds shall be retired 
over a period not to exceed twenty (20) years from tho da to ot Issuance thoroof. 
The plans and cost estimates for Ihe Ubrary Project are available for public 
Inspection al the Lako Villa District Library, 1001 East Grand Avenue, Lake Villa. 
Illinois. 

DATED this 11th day of December, 1995 
David T. Hartwtn 
Secretary, The Board ot Ubrary 
Trustees, Lake Villa Public Ubrary 
District, Lako County, Illinois 



AnlhonvJGundrum 
President; Tho Board ol Library 
Trustees, Lake Villa Public Lfcrary 
District, Lake County, Illinois 

1295C-464-LV 
DocombeMS, 1995 




Best pet 



The children from the Undenhurst Early Childhood Center 
visited 'Best Pets' In Undenhurst where Steve Dollof helped 
the children pick out a new room pet,-K.C. the hampster. 



Burke chosen for DAR's good citizen 




Lauren Burke 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice Is -hereby given that Shur- 
Lock Sett Storage, Inc., 35865 N. 
Route 45, Lake Villa, IL 60046 will sell 
the personal goods from: 

Unit 55, belonging to Ken 
Bamikow, the goods consist ot Shoes, 
Clothes, Boxos, Crock Pots, Deep 
Fryor. 

Unit 315, belonging to Josoph 
Grande, the goods consist of Gas 
Dryer, Lawn Boy Rototlllor, Two Bikes, 
Band Saw, Air Conditioner, HWo-a- 
Bed, Chairs, Misc. Boxos. 

Unit 406, belonging lo Robert 
Espeland, the goods consist ol 
Vacuum Cleaner, Wicker Furniture, 
Men's Boots, Christmas Tree, Stereo 
Cablnot with Spoakers, TV, Misc. 
Boxes. 

Unit 422, belonging lo Universal 
Decorating Company, Iho goods con* 
stsl of Paint Sprayer, Shoes, T- 
Squaro, Paint Brushos. 

Unit 440, bolonglng to. Kim Grey, 
the goods consist of TV, Bed Frame, 
Mattress. Box Spring, Clothes, 3/8* 
Electric Drill, Misc. Boxes. 

Unit 522, bolonglng to Mary 
Monschlng, the goods constat ol Pols 
& Pans, Emergency Backup Intercom 
System, Fan, Steam Cloaner, 
Propane Tank, Cup Dispenser. 

Unit 824, belonging to Richard 
Kenyon.'tho goods constat ol Gas 
Can, Rubbermaid Truck Storage Box, 
Plpo, Air Gun, Snow Shovel. 

Salo will take place on the premis- 
es on Saturday, December 16, 1995 
at approximately 9:00 a.m. 

We reserve Iho right to accept or 
reject nny or all bids. 

Not responsible for accidents. 
Roger Broders 
President 

1295B-444-LV 

Decembers, 1995 

December 15, 1995 



Lauren Burke, daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. Dan Burke of 
Antioch, has been chosen by the 
senior class as the Antioch 
Community High School's 1995- 
96 recipient of the DAR 
(Daughters of the American 
Revolution) Good Citizens 
Award. Burke was chosen for her 
dependability,, service, leader- 
ship and patriotism. Burke iscdi- 
tor-of-chicf of the "Tom Tom," 
has been a member of the 
National Honor Society for two 
years, is a four year varsity run- 
ner in cross country and track, 
and has a long list of accomplish- 
ments. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

The following amount musl be 
received In cash at Ihe olfico of 
Antioch Sell Storage, 284 Main Street, 
Antioch, Illinois 60002. If not rocolvod, 
the contonts ol the below listed units 
will be disposed ol on: Doc. 22, 1995. 

Unit Number 15; Name: Jetl 
Poketama; Address: 41679 Country 
Club, Antioch, IL; Amount owed: 
$280.00 (plus cost of advertising). . 

Unit Number 26; Namo: Aaron 
Young; Address: 533 Bobty Lane, 
Mundelein, IL; Amount owed: $690,00 
(plus cost ot advertising). 

Unit Number 31; Name: Ken 
Drewlor; Address: 96 Timber Ln„ 
Antioch, IL; Amount owed: $500.00 
(plus cost ol advertising). , 

Unit Number 47; Name: Mark 
Kroepel; Address: Bristol, Wl 53104; 
Amount owed: $700.00 (plus cost of 
advertising). 

Unit Number 74; Name: Dennis 
Hall; Address: Antioch, IL; Amount 
owed: $700.00 (plus cost ol advertis- 
ing). 

Unit Number 82; Name: Lara 
Gardener; Address: Lake Villa, IL; 
Amount owed: $300.00 (plus cost ol 
advertising). 

Unit Number 101; Name: Leo 
Guzan; Address: Trevor, Wl 53179; 
Amount owed: $400.00 (plus cost of 
advertising). 

Unit Number 134; Namo: Tod 
Burbridgo; Address: Antioch, IL 
60002; Amount owed: $275.00 (phis 
cost of advertising). 

Unit Number 158; Name: Tammy 
Choveratte; Address: Antioch, IL; 
Amount owed: $500.00 (plus cost ol 
advertising). 

All ol the. Items stored In above 
units will be sold to highest bidder for 
cash. Antioch Sell Storage reserves 
the right to withdraw any or all ot the 
Items stored In the above mentioned 
units prior to sale. 

1295B-447-AR 

Decembers, 1995 

Decomber 15, 1995 



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DccEMbER 15, 1995 LaIceIancI Newspapers COMMUNITY. 






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SELLING HOMES 

THROUGHOUT 

LAKE AND 

MCHENRY 

COUNTY 

CAROLYN 
THEESFIELD 

MEMBER 100% CLUB : 
RE/MAX'S HIGHEST SALES AWARD 

(708)838-2276 



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Buying or Selling? 

It's Easy! Just Call 

838-CAROLYN 

A 24 Hour Message Center 



^SJSOlBBEiiSZ 










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SNUCCLE UP TO YOUR 

FIREPLACE CUSTOM 4 

BEDROOM J YEARS NEW 

Hum the t ray Jr pot perch lo the acre hon* - 
tile Out home ttyt WELCOME HOME! 
Dun ia IWD inl hclkr Uup m INi I Kny 
eiJoiutl offrrt 4 Nj heiaoorm, 11/3 hMh*. 

lining liwn hufC lltrta-t with llnWi lo 

link. vatflrd tritifttl, imjk-r milr wlh 
| tmjc whirlpool, i Hill htxmrDt, f,* l Ff • * 

tni»i(nl fia fliinrfirnilyiDniriwithaead- 
| UaninftftiTpLKf i«J li<« mm. I ytarhorrr 

waunly and 100% fliinrlng la qudifird 

buyer. 

OFFERED AT $199,900 



T.'V?' 





IcSS 



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LOOKING FOR A 
LARGE HOME? 

THIS IS IT! 

"Hal 3 4 bedroom, 2 bati totolial lit* hitfi 
«■ ■ hitl wi'.h likr ritjioi la the ihim riff* 
daws tie Unci, The aupct iiml Irving room 
It 21 II 16. <iielDK roam 1 6 * 13 P*u* »» '" 
It fully apphinnd liter* t, A 17ill muter 
bedroom, utility loom, pool, 1-1/3 t«r 
girigc tnJ lull rfrcecd upfiairi til oa .44 
limbered terra, t ]*« heme warranty ltd 
1 00% rinaaclkgloquilifi-d luyn. 

CALL TODAY $147,500 







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THE CURRENT MARKET VALUE 

OF YOUR HOME. 

AREN'T YOU JUST A UTILE CURIOUS? 

CALL CAROLYN 838-2276 



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EYERYTHINC'S BEEN 

DONE * JUST MOVE IN 

AND ENJOYI 

Dc one of On tint lo He 1H1 hetuUrutly 
updated home a* i ucdacaped crtorr lot 
with paver t™ k wiilwtjn. 3-4 brdroona, 2 
rul bMht, new kitchen, or* cwpet, parr, jet 
entry, nrw root it/iuradouri lo the den (4th 
bedroom), fteahty tnuitrd lad hat waitlag 
for you. 1 yt it hone wnuyud 100% 
fluid l| lo qualified buyer. 



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Pn'ccd to till 

$W,900 




LOOKING FOR VALUE 

ONLYS1J9,900 

4 BEDROOM IN 

UNDENHURST 

That'i righll TNI 2 May eelnaitl b priced 
lo tell. \x itixti inckkk 4 bedroom, lull Gl- 
iiied tiutneu with HUM, newer briber 
ufpet n livi»| room ttd diBiag room. It m 
fKtff.tH la kileliti iml • Ikhiim HimU 
room fee 3 icaoi tijoynr it renud yud 
ulmitt.l ytcvwrnniy i»JlOO*Du»c- 
Inf rvn I iri kc (o'truiified buyrt 

ONLY 

$179,900 



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.jsaEsoaaag mi mini mini tsaajsar, ., 



DON'T LIKE-WINTER? 
THINK SPRING! 

la fc4f li ynr pratl Thei till horn n lor 
you, Thi« rejuidul curiam ruxh tli H|M 
ot the grrei. Ycu'S love rhe prit roam «Hh 
v Biked «ilil|ii uti villi ol ratio doer* la 
rhe funny, 2 b e d iou m t uji tad • rouble 
3rd dm»a pfca 3 fill bftht, tad ■ laj* tori . 
ty room. Oanee, central ik, lad iD (te 
imetlin. Cone !i« Its food bfr. I yt» 
horcc wa^uty •■! 100% Guadog rviil- 
>Me la qniUSed buyer. 




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OFFERED AT 
$189,000 



;'.'"/. *•» 





LIGHT UP THE NEW YEAR 
IN YOUR NEW HOME 

Saitir atwyearriij* wi<b BiiibriirtifulJ 
brdroomj 3 bab hone la ■ puNiimina vih 
vntiing pour*, pati, poodt, >■] opea aren. 
Tim oaiora Cape Cod li tnc lad Jala 4 bcai- 
Uful liadKiprd kx ud often I lint floor 
inralrf bull auric wUh titUig ««, vhatpml 
tub I Dd wilt 11 c kxrU, I taigC i JU-te I will 
loll of eantarta, •aoreiruchomlooiJif, 
one of OM parli, firrily roonv futl raae n t at, 
f a-tce inJ mere. | ycM home warruay loJ 
I0O» Oaaaeiaf to rpuUird buyer. 



$179,900 



Please listen this Christmas, Eve and dayJto radio statibnlWlliRjlGSO 

AM And VV1IL, 95.1 FM for holiday rnUsip throughoiii fe 

this simulcast are brought 

Advantage for your holiday enjoymelBl' 




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LOOKING FOR JUST THE 
RIGHT HOME? 

HERE IT IS!! 

Thit rrteally updilrd 2 bedrooni hone la 
wilting hart fn you. Newer tmji udiiuj, 
roof, furiiu, uatnl 111, and mm. I jijt 
uving room %ah drcorMai (aTplicc, firnrf 
losro, ctl la btchci, aad ■ 2 tar f.irift. 
Wiat n<n1 1 low trout • | yt B bona war. 
raaty loo. 100% GiMCJag available toeaiil- 
ifinl buyer. 

OFFERED AT 
$82,900 




JSl^y^iSaClS5«a»*-< 



HOME FOR 
THE HOLIDAYS. 

Cone hone tu thii la-ee 3 beAoanv 2 balh 
ra&LhkoeMrdlBlawiiiAatlodi.Thlahoinr 
rua ill Hx fcMum you want. A fiirt Door 
farraly room with UMdm lo ttt tuje deck 
ud fenced yud with pool, ■ huge tiviag 
toom with cciiy Grrp'ax, arparMc dining, 
room, a partially fjialrJ baaemat u4 ■ 2- 
1/2 car g«age. Alto • I ye* horoe wamaly 
k'ai!-r"^**^* tad IOO% flu^aa; Ic qiuiuVd buven. 





$149,900 



Lake front 
Property 




LAKEFRONT 
ONLY $149,900 

U* ooe ti Ihe r.rrt la arc all tr f/Murri of 
Ihli rtually updated lakefiont homr. 
Viutlrd criliBf.a »i0i akyliajla, all oik trim 
new kilchcD wlJi all a|r4iu<ra. Id IVirr 
ultbty room, new carpetiBg ihroughnut, ill* 
en from Bk living roum and ooe of Dtc two 
rnirnima lo UV sew urck ovrrlonkiBg the 
kke. HtceBlly tiled in) new electro. 65 
feci on Sic water. 100% fiouaing nulaUc 
lo quifaricd buyir, 



Jti\^ 



$149,900 



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I-H^JatjE^- K* J - ■- - , 



WANT TO DO A LITTLE 

FIX UP? 

THEN THIS HOME 

IS FOR YOU. 

lived la (he rutin with thit 3 bedroom 2 

| bah mull at trvi from laic Aallach. Toil 
horrc offer* • full baacToeat, I M fleet famlry 
room, t beautiful bviag room aad diaitg 
room »ilh pcfjfd floorina; aad ■ ftimil Tire- 
place, ■ tenrrout liard krkhea with catiaa, 
arc a, raattaf bath, aod toil more. A lule dec- 
, oraUag ind pm» tad tut horrc will he i 
I Miow |4icc, I year home wvraaty too. 

OFFERED AT $159,900 



■ 
; 



WATERFRONT 

CUSTOM BRICK 

RANCH 

,"■ You'l rail la love wih tiit curtora hrkk 
t f,raach oa 1 large laadacaped chtutl boat 
■ . uLc u> W acre private duck iatr. The homr 
, i oflcri t formal cfiaig room, arwrr gotamrt 
luchea, Miea reauarr bauX Hill livtag 
room, IM floor fanily room with cary fn. 
pi act ud doon to p*jo anl water. Bam Be 
momeM youcata die foyet yon 1 ! tapw thii 
horn wit bulk waft quality. 1 year bona 
wtrruly too. 



OFFERED AT 
$284,900 




WINTER WONDERLAND 

LAKEFRONT ON 

LAKE MARIE 

Thai be autifid 1-tM Kit like holt «UIC it I 
wall ng for you, Eajoy the four actual from I 
your deck omrlooklig Ltic MMk , Thii 34 1 
bedroom, 2 ttory colonial offm t full fn I 
uhed walk out btarracit. 3-1/2 bMht, rorroal I 
diajng roora firrily room, large knchcll 
waft cMiag area, tad more. There it » tviii ■ I 
Lkmil Uir front acre tvtilablc witi Ihk pop- 1 
eriy. 1 y«« home w«rtoty ind 100% fliue. 
itg lo qutlitcd buyer. 

OFFERED AT 

,m9oo 



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ANTIOCH PUBLIC IL'iBR \RY DISTRICT 

757 N. Main Street Dtcewben 15, 1995 UkdAwd NewspApcRs COUNTY 



757 N. Main Street P"=g»bc» 15, 1995 UkM Newspapers COUNTY 

OBE is woven into Illinoisefueational system 



NEAL TUCKER 

RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 

Editors : : — r- 

Parcnts who have been frightened by the prospect of 
Outcome Based Education (OBE) coming to Illinois can 
breath a collective sigh of relief if they hang on the words 
from a spokesman for the State Board of Education— OBE is 
not mandated or encouraged by that governing body. 

But, according to the detractors of OBE, who have demo- 
nized the educational philosophy as one that "dumbs down" 
students to bring them to a base level of parity, parents 
should not breath easily at all. They believe the statement by 
the State Board of Education's senior policy advisor Tom 
Kcrins was misguided at best 

That Is an unbelievable statement for him to make," said 
State Representative Al Salvi (R-Wauconda). "Outcome 
Based Education is everywhere in Illinois. We get federal 
grants for it." 

Salvi said OBE is encouraged at the federal level and states 
have fallen in line in embracing the educational philosophy 



for the trade off of pouring added federal dollars into educa- 
tion coffers. 

"Only a couple of states have rejected those dollars (and 
therefore OBE. Illinois is not one of them," Salvi added. 

Despite the claims of Kcrins, 
Salvi said OBE manifests itself within 
the much better known program 
titled Goals 2000. The program 
focuses increasing attention on 
teacher guidelines for student learn- 
ing outcomes than it does for basic 
learning requirements, informally 
known as" the three Rs. Because the 
goals for learning arc in the plan 
without necessarily stating they arc 
outcome based, Salvi disputes the 
claim by the State Board of Education that schools them- 
selves can pick and choose the parts of OBE they prefer. 

"To say it is optional is meaningless," Salvi said 

Detractors of OBE have become proactive lobbyists in 



vflnglng 
Curriculum 



their efforts to stop the growth of OBE In the state education: 
al system, if not remove it entirely. Last week, an Elk Grave 
village radio station sponsored a seminar to Inform the pub- 
lic about the dangers of OBE Salvi, who was one of the fea- 
tured speakers at the event said the 
attending crowd of 500 to 600 people 
is not uncommon for such events. 

"It's scary. Ft Is scaring people all 
over the state," Salvi said. 

Organizers on the Illinois 
Conference on Outcome Based 
Education said the public response 
to the conference was great Both 
Salvi and Congressman Phil Crane 
(R-8th) spoke at the conference. 
Crane, a former history professor, 
has long spoken out against the federal government's 
Involvement in education. 

"Usually, when you do these types of events, you arc 
See OBE page B7 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 





Logo redesign 



wants to 
update 
image 
PAGE B2 




forms legacy 

Durable Bob Depke 
plans to continue 
'service' 
RAGEB4 

Kids helping kids 

Christmas Seal program 
has many rewards 
PAGE B8 




Civil War history 

Adventurer shares 
history with students 
PAGE B9 

FunEactory 

Lakeland Newspapers' 
kid's page 
PAGE BIT 

AtHpme 

Cuneo celebrates; 
Christmas in style 
PAGE B 15 



Police nab suspects in gang shooting 



Four in custody, victim remains hospitalized 



ALEC JUNGS 



Staff Reporter 

Round Lake Beach and Zion Police dis- 
guised as plumbers arrested the suspect 
believed to be the shooter in a gang related 
shooting. 

Arrested was Gregory A. Kogcr, 17, 

unknown address, who Ls charged with 

nttomptod first degree murdor, ugKnvntoti bat- 
tery with a firearm* and armed vIolencfc.-'The'' 

arrest ends a week-long manhunt for the sus- 
pect 

"It culminates an intensive investigation by 
Round Lake Beach Police," said Commander 
John Laycock. "Round Lake Beach* officials 
consider the arrest significant because we felt 
he was a serious threat to our residents.'* 

Round Lake Beach officers along with eight 
Zion officers, armed with an arrest warrant, 
went to 2301 Hebron Apt 1, believed to be a 
gang hideout, on Dec 1 1. 

"Officers using the role of plumbers gained 
entry to the apartment complex," Laycock said. 

Found in the apartment was a sawed off 
.410 shotgun believed to be the weapon and a 
12 gauge shotgun. Also in the apartment were 



the leaders of a major Lake County street gang, 
Laycock said. 

The 12 -gauge may also be linked to other 
incidents in Lake County. One of the leaders 
was arrested on warrants. 

Kogcr was sought in connection with the 

shooting of Alfredo Ramirez, 17, of Round Lake 

■Beach on Dec. 2, outside Kristofs 

Ramirez is reported to be in fair condition 
In an undisclosed hospital. He-needed surgery 
to repair his arm after getting shot in the right 
arm and chest 

Kogcr is a former Grant student Grant 
High took measures to protect their students 
after several teens at Grant High School report- 
ed seeing Kogcr at the school on Dec 4 picking 
up friends. Reportedly, he told students he was 
going to return Dec. 7. He never showed up 
that day, said police. 

However, in communicating with the 
administration at Grant police agreed there 
should be heightened security and locked the 
school's 22 entrance doors with chains Dec 7. 
Grant Superintendent Dr. John Benedctti said 



he passed around copies of Roger's yearbook 
picture to teachers in case he would be seen at 
the school. 

Benedctti was absent from the school on 
Thursday and Friday, reportedly out on busi- 
nesses. Becky Foster, pupil /personnel direc- 
tor at Grant took over as spokesperson last 
Friday. 

Foster said she didn't want to call what was 
done a "lockdown," but added the Hound Lake 
Beach shooting incident link with Grant Is a 

"scrioutltww.,. 

On Monday, Bencdetti said 'the -security 

watch was over and chains were removed from 
the doors Dec 8, The Grant superintendent 
said safety for students Is number one. "We'll 
do whatever we can do, however we want to 
. keep things as dose to business as usual [here] 
so we don't have a chaotic situation," said 
Benedctti 

-The shooting was allegedly over the way 
rival gang members looked at each other, 
according to police officials. 

All four subjects involved in the incident 
have been arrested. Wes Whitman, 18, address 
unknown, turned himself in to AnrJoch Police 
on Dec 9. John L Williams, 18, of Gurncc, was 
arrested the evening of the shooting along with 
a 15-year-old. 




Metra hikes fares; new 
line planned for summer 

KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Citing the cost of inflation and building improvement needs, Metra 
officials said the commuter rail service wul increase its fares for the 
first time since 1989. 

Don Udstuen, a member of the regional board of directors, told 
Lake County board members a 6 percent rate increase will go into 
effect next February. He said the cost of a monthly ticket will increase 
$5.40 a month or roughly 27 cents a day. 

M We need the increase because of operational costs," Udstuen said. 
"It will be the first increase we've had in six years." 
' He noted that fares actually decreased by 10 percent after Metra 
• took control of the commuter rail service in 1984 before an increase 
was instituted in 1989, 

"We have an obligation to raise fares when it is justified," Udstuen 

said. 

lie also confirmed reports that the new Metra service along the 
Wisconsin Central Railroad will begin late next summer as opposed to 
early hopes of the spring. 

"We anticipate to be on line by the end of the summer," Udstuen 
said, "it will be one of the first new (commuter rail line) starts in the 

country." 

He said the spring start-up date was an estimate. 

"I think it is unfair to say it was a delay because communities have 
come on line at different times," Udstuen said. 

The commuter rail service along the Wisconsin Central tracks will 
have train stations in Antloch, Lake Villa, Grayslakc, Mundclcin, 
"Vernon Hills, Prairie View and Buffalo Grove enroute to O'Hare Airport 
and downtown Chicago. Each community came up with the resources 
Sec FARES page B2 



*&rp;- .-.-. -"- - ■: -r-?->w "■■.'*- ' 




Ballot bound 

Circuit Court Clerk Sally Coffelt files petitions seeking reelec- 
tion with Terry Riedl of the County Clerk's office. Coffelt Is the 
only Republican to file for the office. Filing continues through 
Dec. 18. The primary Is March 19, 1996— Photo by Unda 
Chapman 








COUNTY UkEUiNd Newspapers DcceMbiit 13r, 199? 




County to redesign 
logo for $104,000 



Shepherds keeping watch 

Puja Singh 0efJ) and Adam Darby were two shepherds who kept watch over the flock during 
the Utile Lamb Christian Preschool Christmas program In Gumee.— Photo by Noal Tucker 

Moore to seek third term in the House 



Current Illinois State Rep. Andrea S. Moore (R- 
Libcrtyvillc) has filed petitions for a third term in the 
Illinois Mouse of Representatives, 

"Last year, the Republicans gained the leadership 
in the Illinois I louse of Representatives. I am seek- 
ing re-election to continue the work that we have 
hegun in reforming state government," stated 
Moore. 

Republicans in the General Assembly have 
passed and implemented several key pieces of legis- 
lation. In an effort to shift control back to communi- 
ties, schools arc now allowed to waive state man- 
dates and the creation of charter schools was given 
the green light. Higher education was made more 
accountable by eliminating two state bureaucra- 
cies — the Board of Governors and the Board of 
Regents. The Republicans also took on tough crime 
initiatives by cracking down on sex offenders, 
increasing criminal penalties, passing the Truth in 
Sentencing bill and expanding boot camps for juve- 
nile offenders. In addition, tort reform and health 
insurance pooling and portability was enacted to 
protect Illinois businesses and their workers. "1 am 
very proud of the work that we have accomplished 
and look forward to the upcoming session. I have a 
record of achievement and hope to maintain the 
confidence of the voters," state Moore. 

Over the past two terms, Rep. Moore has initiat- 
ed several important pieces of legislation. They 
include the Domestic Violence Bill which amends 
the Firearm Owners Identification Card Act to add 




spouse and child abusers to 
the existing list of people inel- 
igible to buy guns. She has 
also introduced legislation to 
carry out the National Voter 
Registration Act of 1993, a 
federal mandate that requires 
states to conduct voter regis- 
tration in public facilities. The 
"Leaf Burning Ban Act," HB 

VG91, prohibits One burning ot 

landscape waste in any coun- Moor© 
ty with more than 100,000 inhabitants. Finally, HB 
1122, would authorize an immediate eviction pro- 
ceeding for tenants in public housing projects 
caught in the possession, sale, use or delivery of a 
firearm that is prohibited under State and Federal 
Law. 

. Several state, and local organizations have hon- 
ored Rep. Moore for her continued service to Lake 
County and the State of Illinois. The Illinois 
Chamber of Commerce awarded her with their 100 
percent rating for Rep, Moore's championing of 
Illinois business issues. The Waukcgan 
Developmental Center Assn. for Retarded Citizens 
recognized Rep. Moore's dedication to the residents 
of the Kiley Center and the needs of the mentally ill. 
The Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence 
also recognized Rep. Moore for her work in the 
Illinois House of Representatives on behalf of vic- 
tims of domestic violence. 



Lake County orders US Cable to lower rates 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Depletions of smoke stacks, 
guns, and battle axes arc not 
exactly the type of first impres- 
sion county officials want 
to continue to portray 
of Lake County. 

Instead of pol- 
lution and vio- 
lence, county 
board members 
want a more 
alluring logo 
which better 
reflects the coun- 
ty. 

As the -county pre- 
pares to order new station- 
ary, business cards, signs or 
anything else with the county's 
official seal, board members 
voted to spend approximately 
$104,000 to design a new logo. 
The county awarded the design 
contract to Chicago-based 
Grady and Campbell Inc., 
designers of the IBM logo. 

County board members said 
the 30-year-old logo has 
become outdated. In that time, 
they said the county's business 
sector, for example, has moved 
from light industry to profes- 
sional services, and the rural 
sector has changed from rolling 
hills and lakes to upper-middle 
class neighborhoods /with a 
focus still geared toward con- 
servation. 

But one Antioch resident 
noted that many people did not 
even know the county had a 

logo to begin with and question 
why the county would spend 
$104,000 for a new logo. 

"Assuming that a new logo 
is a necessity, we do not think 
that It Is worth spending 
$104,000," said Chris Konstans 
of Antioch. 

He added, "We cannot help 
but wonder where the County 
Board's priorities are? On the 
one hand, you say that there is 
not enough money to maintain 
the roads so we need a county 
gas tax." 

In return, Konstans sug- 
gested holding a logo design 
contest open to all Lake 
County high school students, 
and the winner would be 
awarded a $5,000 or $10,000 
scholarship. 

"This would cost the county 




far less money than the current 
plan," Konstans said. "It would 
also help send a student to col- 
lege who might not otherwise 
be able to afford it* 

But county board 
members argued that 
an appealing logo is 
necessary to com- 
municate the . 
county's overall 
mission, to 
identify county 
buildings and 
employees, and 
to create a sense 
of pride. 

For example, 
board member James 
La Belle noted that the Lake 
County Forest Preserve District 
invested heavily on its new logo 
and signs designating forest 
preserves. 

LaBclle said the investment 
allows people to identify what 
is forest preserve property and 
may have played a public rela- 
tions role during the $30 mil- 
lion referendum voters 
approved two years ago. 

Kerry Grady of Grady and 
Campbell Inc. said a good logo 
lasts a lifetime and allows peo- 
ple to immediately associate a 
logo with a business. 

"Typically, local govern- 
ment does not understand, as 
business does, how to use 
design to forward their mis- 
sion,'* Grady said. 

Wne l *J lcr .. U.'?.,on'.io / *t-^h— •<• 

or on a street sign, tic went on 

to point out that outsiders of 
visitors to the county first asso- 
ciate Lake County by a logo. 

He also said the logo could 
help the county's mission to be 
the one of the finest hi the 
country which aims to harbor a 
"safe, diverse and harmonious" 
living environment. 

County officials said this is 
the best time to design a new 
logo because the new "847" 
area code takes effect in 
January and new stationary has 
to be ordered to replace the 
current "70S" area code. 

County Board member 
Angelo Kyle,, who originally 
supported a high school con- 
test to design a new logo, said a 
timely contest could not be 
completed before the new area 
code change. 



US Cable subscribers in unin- 
corporated Lake County will pay 
less for their service than they arc 
now, thanks to a rate order issued 
by the County Board. 

Lower rates are the result of a 
year-long study the county com- 
pleted along with 1 1 Lake County 
municipalities also served by US 
Cable of Lake County. Savings 



county- wide will amount to. an 
estimated $193,546. Subscribers 
living in unincorporated Lake 
County will realize an estimated 
$52,958 savings. 

Under the Cable Consumer & 
Protection Act of 1992, local gov- 
ernments that file for certifica- 
tion with the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission (FCC) may 



Fares 



From page Bl 

to purchase the necessary land to build a train station and parking lot 

at each site, while Metre built the loading platform at each site. 

"The community contribution has been tremendous," Udstucn 

said. ■ 

He also noted that cost for the service is approximately $1 million 
per mile, "which is a lot less than the cost to build an interstate high- 
way/? Udstucn remarked. 

He further indicated that the Wisconsin Central line will promote 
growth in central Lake County from Antioch to Buffalo Grove. 

"It's the major growth area in the county," Udstucn said. "When 
you put in a hew line, you create a new market. We will create our own 
market in the area." 



regulate rates for basic cable ser- 
vice only. The FCC regulates ex- 
panded service, while pay-per- 
view programming is not regu- 
lated at all. 

"We're pleased that we arc 
able to realize savings for our 
Lake County cable subscribers," 
Chairman of the Board Robert 
Depkc said. "These savings arc 
substantial, especially when you 
look at the reduction we were 
able to negotiate for the installa- 
tion of new service." 

New subscribers will save an 
estimated $30.27 a year, while 
current subscribers will save an 
estimated $4.44 a y^car with die- 
new rates. 

Equipment and Installation 
rate's also will be frozen during 
1996 under the agreement 
Unless US Cable appeals Lake 
County's rate order to the FCC, 
new rates will go into effect witii- 
in 30 days. For more information 
contact Cable Administrator 
Anne O'Conncll at 360-6558. 



m 



County seeking outside 
bids for zoning revision 

Bids are being sought from private firms to draft revisions in the 
nearly 10-year-old Lake County zoning ordinance covering land 
use in unincorporated areas. 

County Board Rep. Richard Raftis (R-Wildwood), chairman of 
Planning, Building, and Zoning, said revisions will be outsourced 
to capitalize on knowledge and experience of private consultants. 

Addressing a breakfast meeting of the Grayslake Round Table, a 
group of retired executives, Raftis said he hasn't been pleased with 
in-house revisions in the past. 

"I think we should be trying new things," exclaimed Raftis, who 
will be seeking reelection to a two-year term In the 1996 elections. 

By privatizing revision work, Raftis said the county's outmoded 
zoning document could be ready for adoption "within a year." 

Speaking of the much-maligned suburban classification pro- 
viding for mixed uses, Raftis said the current document provides 
for buffering to separate disparate uses. "I'm not sure that concept 
is valid anymore," declared Raftis, who was the only first- termer 
appointed to head a major committee when elected in 1992. : 

Raftis said the county wants to proceed from its current density 
standard of two units per acre on a gross basis, but provide for 
densities up to three and a half an acre through builder donations 
of open space and preservation areas. 




Dtcmbm 1 5, 1995 UJcElANd Newspapers COUNTY 






■ 



^At A GIainc 





Accident causes power outage 

FOX LAKE— Power was out to residents on the cast 
side of Fox Lakeahd Ingleside after a vehiclcstruck a 

utility pole. On Dec 10 

around 5:30 p.m. Fox 
Lake firefighters 
received a call 
about the accident 
which occurred at 
the area of Elm 
Street off of Rollins 
Road: Four people 
LAKE were in a car which 

Cjmintv hita,1 S ht P° ,c » 
V/Uun,l 7 knocking out power 

for several hours in 
parts of town. As a result/ the 
wires came down arcing the 
ground and the sparks ignited a 
gas line. Commonwealth Edison got 
the power back on swiftly, according to fire officials, 
and Northern Illinois Gas also repaired the pipe quick- 
ly. Rescue workers said there were no serious injuries, 
only minor lacerations and contusions. The patients 
were treated and released. 

Mayor: No tolerance for gangs 

ROUND LAKE BEACH— Mayor Ralph Davis said 
ills community will not tolerate gang violence against 
residents. He was speaking of a gang-related shooting 
on Dec 2 at Kristofs Entertainment Center & World of 
Fun. The alleged shooter,. Gregory A. Koger, 17, 
Unknown address, was arrested in Zidn Dec 1 1. In the 
wake of the shooting, Davis said the Round Lake police 
and community leaders will hold a Gang Task Force* . 
meeting on Dec. 14 at the Round Lake Fire Station at 
409 Nippersink Road. 

Santa's Cottage warms heart 

MUNDELEIN— It was probably just as cold at the 
North Pole as it was at Santa's Cottage in Mundelein 
lost Saturday. Because Santa knew people were 

already waiting, his fire truck arrived a tlttlo ahoad of 
sclicdulo ana ho took his plnco oflionor in the little 

house at the corner of Park and Seymour streets. Those 
who, couldn't brave the cold wiU have another chance. 
The big guy will be back Saturday from 10 a.nx to 4 
p.m. and again on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 
evening from 6 to fl p.m. Every child who visits Santa 
will receive a holiday bag full of surprises and coupons 
that can be redeemed at businesses in the village. Kids 
arc encouraged to bring a canned food item to be 
donated to a local food pantry. 



Post office parking unclear 

GRAYSLAKE— Rob Smyth of Grayslakc Is trying to 
lease parking space to the Grayslakc post office, but the 
village has said his land is in violation of the JLakc 
County Watershed Development Ordinance. The village 
served Smyth with a summons this month and he will 
appear In court Dec. 20 for his violation of the ordi- 
nance. Smyth contends the ordinance says he can fill 
the land, if an equal amount of dirt is removed from 
another portion to compensate for the fill. 

land talks concern chiefs 

GUBNEE— The leaders of Warren Township youth 
sports programs are concerned about the impact of 
use by Warren Township High School may have on 
' athletic fields. Brian Clancy, president of Warren 
United Soccer and Rick Dreyer, president of Warren 
girls Softball program, gave their views to township 
board members on Monday. The high school is build- 
ing a 2,100 student second building south of Warren 
Township Center. 

Group short oh time 

WAU CONDA— A committee formed to put a plan 
together to build an auditorium at Wauconda High 
School is running short on time. The committee, orga- 
nized by Wauconda Unit restrict 118, has until Jan. 4, 
1996 to present a plan agreeable to board members if 
they want a referendum on the spring ballot* The 
deadline for filing for the March 19 primary is Jan. 12. 
So; far, two plans were presented, one costing $6 mil- 
lion and the other $3.9 million. Board members were 
not impressed and did not want to take it to the resi- 
dents for a vote. "We might be rushing into this," said 
Gary Thompson, board president "I think it would be 
premature to put this on the March ballot" WHS is 
one of the few high schools in the area without an 
auditorium. 

Trustee resigns after surgery 

KULDEER— Village Trustee James Batts was forced . 
to resign after having undergone emergency brain 
surRory to ramqvo a tumor the size of a large orange. 

Bull* feud icTvo-l for two. •i^rp n ., H .| CyMm .«•-*.;■** of 

the Preservation Party. All party members were elected 
in 1993, and ironically, all three trustees have resigned 
following the April 1995 elections, the rumor had 
grown for four to six years and was discovered in an 
emergency room examination. Batts is now recuperat- 
ing at his home, a few weeks following the successful 
surgery. He is also taking a leave of absence from Niles 
West High School, where he teaches English and 
directs plays. 



Drug bust in the Beach 

ROUND IAKE BEACH— Round Lake Beach Police 
assisted Chicago Police in what is considered the 
largest drug bust in Lake County history, according to 
prosecutors. Police found 171 pounds of marijuana at a 
home in Redhead Court on Dec 6. Arrested and 
charged with possession of marijuana with intent to 
deliver are Jose Peralcs, 28, of Chicago and Walter M. 
Vclasco, 33, of Whcaton. Lt Michael Cushingof the 
Chicago police department said they followed the sus- 
pects from Chicago to the home. The street value of 
the drugs is estimated at $7 million. 

PX. schools not wanted 

GRAYSLAKE — Approximately 30 parents of 
Grayslakc Elementary District 46 students attended a 
meeting at the middle school, to protest the implemen- 
tation of a policy outlining the use of cultural, ethnic 
and religious themes in educational programs for the 
district this year. The policy responds to concerns that, 
certain school celebrations in the past alienated mem- 
bers of the increasingly diverse student body. Many of 
the parents feel the policy is to exclusionary and want to 
sec it reformed. 

Serial robber hits bank 

VERNON imiS-T A "serial bank robber" held up 
First American Bank in Vernon Hills at gun point 
According to an FBI spokesperson, the robber 
approached a teller brandishing a handgun and 
ordered the teller to fill a brown paper bag full of 
money. The teller filled the bag with an undetermined 
amount of money, and the robber fled the scene. This 
was the second armed bank robbery in Vcmon Hills 
this year. The FBI believes the robber is linked to a 
number of armed robberies' in Lake Zurich, Palatine, 
Deerfield, Oakbrook Terrace and Schaumburg. The FBI 
also believes the robber was responsible for the first 
armed robbery at Hawthorn Center Bank in Vernon 
Hills last summer. 

Residents urged to fight 53 

HAWTHORN WOODS — Speaking from experience. 
- ^dtapiw j»wH«««»n^f«*mVnilCo*mty urged * 

Hawthorn Woods residents to stand up for their rights 
in the face of a possible extension of Route 53. John 
Walllscr ,of Homer Township who is ; now raking the 
state to federal court , warned Hawthorn Woods resi- 
dents that the state, the Illinois Department of 
Transportation and the Illinois Toll Highway Authority 
do not follow proper guidelines or federal laws when it 
comes to displacing homeowners living in the line of a 
proposed toll way. 



Lakeland Newspapers seeks reader input for Forefronts 

■i i j. *..*_.. «!.'»<• -i r*_i._ *-i *-. :_ „f *u~ linn tliA nntu Mntm rnmmtlt 



Lakeland Newspapers is 
seeking reader input for 
Forefronts: Progress '96. 

Lakeland Newspapers will 
publish Forefronts, an in-depth 
progress magazine, Feb. 9, 1996. 

The special section will fea- 
ture interviews with the 10 most 
.influential people in Lake 
County as chosen by readers- 
and our editorial staff. 

"As the county is growing 
and changing, we want to reflect 
the views of our readers and 
their concerns," said Rhonda 
Hetrick Burke, editor in chief. 
"We arc excited about giving 

New class teaches 
value of volunteering 

Volunteering and the responsi- 
bilities of volunteers will be the sub- 
ject of a new onc-credit-hour 
• course offered by the College of 
Lake County next spring. A day sec- 
tion of -Introduction to 
Voluntcerism" (EWE 121-001) will 
be offered from noon to 12:50 p.m. 
and an evening section (EWE 121- 
002) from 6 to 6:50 p.m., both on 
Mondays at the Grayslakc campus. 
Interested students must get 
written approval from Constance 
Mcllnay, the coordinator of 
Cooperative Education, before reg- 
istering for the class. The cost of the 
course is $40. For information, call 
Mcllnay at 223-6601, cxt 2423. 



readers an opportunity to par- 
ticipate in our progress edition 
through the survey." 

In addition to naming the 
most influential individuals in 
the county. Forefronts will also 



report on the best restaurants, 
nights spots and recreational 
facilities in the county. 
* The section will also examine 
the problems facing county resi- 
dents, plans for the future and 



why Lake County is one of the 
fastest growing counties in the 
nation. 

Forefronts will also include 
several in-depth stories on such 
topics as downtown rcvitaliza- 



tion, the new Mctra commuter 
line and environmental issues. 

The 1995 section earned an 
award from the Northern Illinois 
Newspaper Association for per- 
sonality profile. 



o 



i w pfc i * wM « . " ^ w mm m mmbh bmb m m mmBMMM 



r y r ' 



Forefronts 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Lakeland Newspapers' in-depth progress edition, Forefronts, will be published Feb. 9, 1996. We are 
seeking reader input for use in this special section. Please return your comments by Dec. 17 to: 

Forefronts Survey 
Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. You can also fax us at 223-881 or 

Grayslake, IL 60030 E-Mail response to: edit@lnd.com 

1. Who is the most influential person in Lake County? : ■ — — — 

2. What is the top recreational spot in Lake County? . : 1 

3. Name your favorite Lake County restaurant. ; . • 

4. What is the best night spot in Lake County?' . : _ . 

5. Name the worst road in Lake County. > — = 

6. What is your biggest concern about the future of Lake County? '. 



7. Whpt is the best reason for living in Lake County? 



Town in which you live. 



W-.- -- ,-,-,„«i.w.>ji«. ,«—- 



■H r' i.*-j "- Hi .ivi.L-- 



' ] 




EDITORIAL UkElANcl Newspapers DtctMben 15, 1995 




Riverboat future 
not 

Plans for big time riverboat gambling crashed in New 
Orleans and the reverberations were felt in places like 
Fox Lake and Waukegan where politicians are pushing 
hard to promote more legalized gaming. 

With riverboats shelved in a high profile tourist cen- 
, ter like New Orleans because grave doubts arose about 
projected profits, Lake County politicians ought to 
rethink their support. The gambling climate has 
changed drastically since Illinois lawmakers first 
authorized 10 sites and not for the better. 

Not the least of the changes was the recent moth-, 
balling of a riverboat casino in East Dubuque, 111., 
because the owners discovered their boat to be 
unprofitable. 

Robert Goodman, a college professor writing in "The 
Luck Business," found a net loss for casino boat com- 
munities after adding costs of treating compulsive 
gamblers, increased welfare, bankruptcies, fraud, 
embezzlements and other criminal activities. So much 
for economic development and recreational enhance- 
ment. 

Goodman learned that riverboats attract mostly local 
gamblers, taking the dollars that currently gravitate to 
other businesses. Economists call the backlash "can- 
nibalization." 

Community leaders in Barrington and Antioch knew 
what they were doing when they put the run on the 
big-rnonied interests seeking county sites for the float- 
ing gambling dens. It's time for Fox Lake and 
Waukegan officials, along with county leaders enam- 
ored with riverboats, to do the same. 

Durable chairman's 

mark forms legacy 

One of Lake County's most durable political careers 
has a ways to go. County Board Chairman Robert : 
Depke announced.his intentions to seek reelection for 
a two-year term that would keep him in office until 
1998. 

Depke's participation in county government goes 
back more than 25 years to the time when township 
supervisors and assistant supervisors constituted the 
County Board. Dissident electors sidelined him for a 
spell, but he came back stronger than ever, to the point 
today where he is the most powerful county chairman 
in county history. 

Contained in Chairman Depke's reelection statement 
was the admonishment, "There is still so much to 
accomplish." Friends and foes alike can only muse 
over what Depke meant by that remark. Other than 
what the veteran politician describes as "progress," 
the Depke agenda is an unknown quantity. 

In the past Chairman Depke has called for the impo- 
sition of a county gasoline tax to raise money for road 
building. He has voiced his support time and time 
again for the controversial Yorkhouse Rd. extension. 
He backs riverboat casino gambling.particularly if 
county coffers will benefit. The chairman sees the 
" hotly contested construction of a new tollway in Lake 
County (Rte. 53) as part of his definition of progress. 
He has supported initiatives for expansion of the 
- courts and judicial system, even when containing 
Unpopular tax increase provisions. 

Chairman Depke has remained consistently pro- 
business, especially where increased employment 
: opportunities are involved. Depke's vision of Lake . 
County as an urban environment enrages environ- 
mentalists and open spacer advocates, but he deflects 
opponnents by pointing out that municipalities have 
issued 10 times as many building permits as has the 
county since 1991. 

Without opposition in {he March primary, the Depke 
era is likely to continue. Controversial/enigmatic, 
abrasive, Bob Depke is leaving his mark on Lake 
County like ho elected official before him. 




^CiUEST COMMENlARiESWElcOIVlE 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns byour leaders on ? 
topics of general Interest. Anyone Interested In writing a column can 
contact Publisher W.H.Sc^roeder at (708) 223-8161 .Submissions 
may be mailed c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O, Box 268, Grayslake 
lit" 60030 or 'fax to (7.08) :223-881 o; Deadline: is i Friday at noon. ^ 

'. .■'■•■'■ ■■:■■■■:'■:■■■-■■•'.■, '..->■ - •■■■■■■■■-■■-■..■■■■ --• ->■■■ - ;■'■;" ■■-•"•■ — :. — '•■ •/; — 



L_ \J I I \J \\\ r\ L Newspapers 



ViEwpoiNT ; 

Americans expendable 
in Bosnia, on highway 



BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 

Can a draft-dodging, super hyp- 
ocritical, skirt-chaslnE. lylnn 
presiaent vvno oiimlnutcil' inc 

national 55 m.p.h. speed limit be 
all bad? 

Well, yes, if you consider he's 
the same guy who is taking a cal- 
culated risk with thousands of 
American lives to give himself a 
fighting chance to get reelected. 

In what must have been an 
enlightened surge, in an over- 
drive charge to reach new heights 
insulting the intelligence of the 
American public, President 
Clinton consigned an estimated 
6,000 Americans to an early death 
as speed-induced victims of 
unsafe highways by wiping away 
the national speed limit 

But that loss of life is nothing 
compared to the possible death 
and camagc on the killing fields 
of Bosnia where presidential van- 
ity has created thousands of tar- 
gets for ethnic crazies to vent 
their centuries-old anger. 

President Clinton simply is 
incapable of disguising his con- 
tempt for American standards of 
morality and common sense. 
Clinton's promise to parents of 
sons and daughters thrust into 
positions of grave danger 
describes Slick Willy on the cam- 
paign trail more than the leader 
of the world's superpower. 
. "I assume full responsibility for 
any harm that may come to our 
troops," Clinton intoned soberly in 
an address where he- outlined a 
reckless flight into undeterminable 
danger. As if words will deflect 
Bosnian mortars and land mines. 
Clinton must think he's president 
of a nation of Neanderthals if he 
thinks people will swallow that 
kindofhogwash. 

Limply, Republican leaders 
have signed on for the Bosnian 
adventure. Would the thought 
seep into their partisan minds 
that if the entire peace keeping 
folly blows up in Clinton's face, 
voters will turn .to a GOP presi- 
dent to pick up the pieces? As 



Kosmo Kramer would reply, with 
a waggle of a bony finger, " Yes, 
ohhhh, yes!" - 

Plvo yours nt;o, tlio nation wus 

agonizing during. the Christmas 
season whether It was wise for 
America to commit to a danger- 
ous mission corraling a dictator 
in the Persian Gulf. Here we go 
again. . 

There is no clear danger in 
Bosnia to our way of life, but we 
arc in agony again because a 
president seemingly has as low a 
regard for life as he has of the 
national sensibility. 

i ••••*•• 

BUILDING FOUNDATION — 

Hats off the Fred and Anna 
Abdula for jump-starting the 
College of Lake County 
Foundation newly created schol- 
arship endowment, fund with a 
$100,000 pledge. 

The Waukegan businessman- 
banker and his wife always have 
been close to CLC. Their four 
children all attended CLC as part 
of their college careers. The 
Foundation will recognize the 
most exemplary of scholarship 
winners as the Abdula Scholar. 
Abdula also taught a CLC class in 
refrigeration in 1969. 
.' ,••,•*•*• 

TIMELY THOUGHT — l*iurcn 
Rankin, 0, and her sister Hannah, 
4, of Mundelcin will be in the 
thoughts of scores of persons this 
holiday season as their parents 
fight to raise funds for research 
into JNCL, a genetic disorder 
affecting both girls. Victims 
rarely live past their late teen' 
years after suffering loss of sight, 
hearing and speech. 

Their parents have organized 
the JNCL Research Fund, a not- 
for-profit organization to pro- 




mote research Into the raro.mala.. 
dy. i Contributions can bo 

dropped off or sent to Quig's 

Orchards, Rte. 60, Mundelcin or 

by calling 708-566-0160. 

*•••••* 

ANOTHER TERM — insurance 

executive . Ron Weeks has 

"reupped" for another term as 

president of the Lake County 

Council of the Navy League in 

1996. Weeks was the sparkplug 

for civilian forces working to save 

Great Lakes Naval Training 

Center from the Pentagon hit list 

two years ago. Ron and his wife 

turned their Hawthorn Woods 

home into a Toys for Tots center 

at a holiday gathering Friday 

night. Gathering toys is a major 

endeavor of the Marine Reserve. 

••**•** 

INSIDE INSIDER — Some of 
the big names in Lake County 
politics discovered who has clout 
when candidates began filing 
nominating .petitions last 
Monday with the county clerk. 
To fast-track the process, office 
seekers* who had economic inter- 
est forms ready were invited to 
submit those forms first before 
the nominating signatures were 
processed. Everyone except 
County Board Rep. Bob Ncal, 
county recorder- aspirant, 
returned to the line. Among 
those left cooling their heels were 
County Chairman Bob" Depke 
and Coroner Barbara Richardson. 
••*•*** 

Bill Schroeder offers editorial 
commentary every Tuesday on 
Lake County Live presented by 
STAR Channel 3/U.S. Cable at 
5:30 and 7:30 p.m. 



Letters WeIcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome! They .should be on topics of 
general interest, approximately ^SOwordsor lessfAUJetters 
must be signed/ and contain a home address and telephone: 
number. The editor reserves the right to condense all letters., 







DtcEMbm 15, 1995 lAkcUm! NewspApcps COUNTY 





Party Unes— — — — — . ■ •"•■ — — — - — — 

Filing begins in flurry, Cooper absent from Recorder race 



Party Lines, Lakeland Newspapers' 
column of political commentary, is pre- 
pared from staff reports. 

Candidates were lined up more than 
an hour prior to the opening of the 
County Clerk's office to file election peti- 
tions for the March primary. Because so 
many candidates arrived simultaneously, 
most will face a lottery system to deter- 
mine who will get top hilling on the bal- 
lot. 

Few surprises- were noted In the first 
two days of filing. Notably absent from 
filing in the first two days was 
Lincolnshire resident Rita Cooper in 
the Recorder of Deeds race. Alberta 
Meyer and Bob Neal will face a lottery 
to determine who is first on the primary 
ballot. 

Other previously undeclared 
Republican candidates filing include: 
Norma Sayles against David Sfolman 
for the Dist. 20 county board race; Ray 
LaCrolx challenging Dick Raf Us in 
County Board. Dist. 11, Peter J. Suk 
competing against Stevenson 
Mountsler and Alan Roberts in the Dist 
17 county board race. That seat, is being 
vacated by . Mark Beaublen who is 
seeking to represent the 52nd district in 
the state House. Additionally, Walter J. 
White is challenging Christopher 
Wakefield for the Dist. 12 county board 

seat; 

• • •• 

Searching— County Board Rep. Bob 
Grever (R-Luke Zurich) has a date for a 
fund raiser. Now he needs a place. 
Grever, who4s opposed by former Lake 
Zurich trustee Jim Johnson for a 
Republican nomination,, is gearing the 

cupltnllv.o on- 



Presidents' Day interest 

• • • 

Recognition— Because it lies in the 
path of the proposed Route 53 tollway 
extension, Liberty Prairie Conservancy 
executive director Betsy Dletel says 
Almond Marsh in Warren Township now. 
is getting the recognition it deserves. The 
wetlands complex, estimated 2,500 acres, 
would be virtually destroyed by highway 
construction. 



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Marks 



• • • 



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19 to 



Misses Mark(s)— Libcrtyville busi- 
nessman Jack Martin, who revels in 
politics from an insider's stance, worked 
the phones long and hard to find a pri- 
mary election opponent for County 
Board Rep. Martha Marks (R- 
Kiverwoods). Martin backed off only 
when it became apparent success was in 
douht and Marks would.be accorded 
endorsement status by default 

• • • 
* Road warriors— The ballots have 
been cast and the votes have been count- 
ed for scats on the board of directors of 
Transportation Management Assn. of 
Lake County. The winners of two-year 

terms arc: Charlea.BHrtela, Manpower 



Letters to iUe EdiTOR 



I 



Rte. 53 supporter biding 

Editor 

This is the only avenue I have to com- 
municate with an anonymous correspon- 
dence I received in regard to Rte. 53. Here 
is its background. Mundelcin Against the 
Tollway just completed a mailing high- 
lighting the 1DOT Rte. 53 public meeting, 
tentatively rescheduled for Jan. 23, 1996. It 
also included a volunteer questionnaire. 

Apparently, a Rte. 53 proponent 
received our mailing in error. Instead of 
notifying MATT by phone at 949-1285 in 
order to have his/her name removed from 
our mailing list, this person chose to 
anonymously fill In the questionnaire with 
pro-53 views and return it. 

To you I say this: We at MATT have 
always had the courage and conviction to 
say what we think in an open and up-front 
manner. Our letters are signed. We take 
responsibility for our actions.' We do not 
hide behind anonymity. We take a stand, 
organize and take action. You felt strongly 
enough about your 53 views to waste your 
time returning that ridiculous attempt at 
humor (?). 

If you meant what you said, stand 
behind it. Use your rights as an American 
citizen to defend your views. Go before the 
village board and tell them how you want 
them to handle the road issue. Write let- 
ters to the editor. Go ahead and start your 
own citizens action group. For goodness 
sake, get the courage to sign your name. 
By all means, have your name taken off 
our mailing list; we don't want to waste 

another stamp. 

Deb Giles 

Mundelcin Against the Tollway 

Dealing away environment 

Editor 

The Lake County GOP chairman, who is 

also a commissioner of the Lake County 
- Forest Preserve, should pay attention to 

the land-grabbing elected officials of 
-Green Oaks who annexed 50 percent of 



Rondout, crossed Rte. 176 to the south of 
Dist 13 and into Dist 15 and destroyed 
one of the oldest wildlife, wetland and for- 
est preserve areas in Lake County, not to 
mention that they have cut down 300 to 
500 trees in this area. 

The Forest Preserve, along with the 
Army Corps of Engineers and the EPA, 
approved the development of 57 "homes 
which are in the $300,000-plus price range 
for this area. The day after the annexation 
of this property, bulldozers and tree 
removal* equipment were there to cut 
down the forest 

Don't you think it was nice of the devel- 
oper to donate an casement to the Forest 
Preserve Dist from the North Shore Bike 
Path to hook up to the Middlefork Savanna 
in Rondout? And guess what The Forest 
Preserve gave the developer an easement 
right back to hook up sewer, water' and 
probably a road to hook up to Elm Street in 
Rondout. 

That's the road that intersects with 
Arcadia Road, the one that leads to the 
Stolzmans' property that has been zoned 
commercial for 100 years. 

Stolzmans wanted to build a small plas- 
tic recycling factory on this railroad right- 
of-way which borders the Middlefork 
Savanna on its west boundary line. After 
two years of legal fees, court costs and 
thousands of taxpayers' dollars, the Forest 
Preserve Board concluded their claim that 
it would bring too much traffic on Arcadia 
Road for local residents. 

I would bet that 80 percent of the Forest 
Preserve Board never viewed this area per- 
sonally and only saw pictures of it on a 
map. That 80 percent shouldn't even be on 
the board. They are sheep arid they need a 
new Forest Preserve chairman. I would 
recommend Suzie Schmidt 

JackCervac 
Ubertyville 

Safety surmounts education? 

Editor 

Since the publication of "A Nation at 



Temporaries; Ray Daase, Trustmark 
Insurance; M.J. Seller, Century 21 
Krcuser & Sciler; William Dlneen, 
Motorola; and Libcrtyville Mayor JoAnn 
Eckmann. 

• • • 

Relative' support— Having a big 
family never hurt anyone running for 
office. Bob Powers, County Board aspi- 
rant in mid-county Dist 16 stretching 
from the Round Lake area to Route 45 at 
Third* Lake, makes no secret about enlist- . 
ing eight brothers and sisters and 23 
nieces and nephews for his campaign 
team. 

Powers, a native of Highland Park, who , 
is drawing on the political expertise of a 
brother-in-law who is running for county 
office in Kane County. The first time can- 
didate, who is out to unseat incumbent 
County Board Rep. Larry Leafblad (R- 
Highland Lake) is employed as retail meat 

manager in a Lake Forest supermarket 

• • • 

OBE Is here— State Representative 
Al Salvl (R-Wauconda) was surprised to 
read in Lakeland Newspapers, accord- 
ing to Illinois State Board of Education 
senior policy advisor Torn Kerlns, that 
Illinois in no way at this time 'mandates 
or encourages school districts to adopt 
the Outcome Based Education philoso- 
phy/ Outcome Based Education is 
under fire around the country because it 
de-emphasizes competition and grad- 
ing and focuses on learner outcomes 
and values training. "That is an unbe- 
lievable statement for him to make," 
Salvi said. "Outcome Based Education is 
everywhere in Illinois. We get federal 
grant money for It" Salvi spoke at the 
Illinois Conference on Outcome Based 



Education, a informational seminar, 
this past weekend. 

• • • 

Get well soon— Gurnce Trustee 
Robert Amaden is recovering at home 
following surgery for a heart condition. 
Amaden, 82, has missed the last couple 
of Gurnce Village Board meetings. Party 
lines -wishes Amaden, a retired Lake 
Forest College educator, a speedy recov- 
ery. 

• • • 

Big deal-District 6 County Board . 
Member Larry Leafblad isn't surprised 
he didn't get the Lake County Republican 
Party endorsement for the district. 
Patrick , McCleskey, Grayslakc 
Elementary school board member 
earned the nod. "My neighbors would be 
worried if I did receive the endorse- 
ment," Leafblad quipped. Leafblad, a 
two-term incumbent, said he is consid- 
ered an "outsider" and has never 
received. the endorsement 

• • • 

Gone, bat not forgotten— The at 

times rancorous Preservation Party of 
Kildeer no longer has representation on 
the village board. The minority voice of 
the community had hopes of gaining total 
control of the board following the April 
elections,- with three members on' and 
three others running. The three candi- 
dates were made write-ins following a fil- 
ing mishap, and since then ail three 
Preservation trustees have resigned. Party 
lines wishes a fast recovery to lames 
Batts, the last trustee to resign for person- 
al health reasons.- He has successfully 
undergone brain surgery to remove a 
.tumor the size of a large orange, and Is 
. recuperating, at home. ;.'—' - - 



Risk" In the early 1980*s, public education 
has been under close scrutiny. This has 
lead to much criticism and a call to reform! 
Over a decide later, there has been much 
rhetoric, some ideas, many political cam- 
paigns and even some reforms. As seen in 
recent elections, public education is still at 
risk. 

Schools today arc called upon to do 
more things for more people than ever 
before. The one-room school house of yes- 
teryear did riot have a school psychologist 
or social worker on staff. Today's schools 
often have several and usually need more, 
as children come to school each day with 
many of society's problems as baggage in 
their backpacks along with reading, writ- 
ing and arithmetic books. 

Due to important special education 
initiatives, hundreds of special needs chil- 
dren arc being served by public education, 
children who 25 years ago would have 
never seen the inside of a classroom 
unless their families could afford private, 
specialized institutions. Yet as public 
expectations of our schools has increased, 
has the public's willingness to support 
education, both financially and with their 
service, likewise increased? 

Let's look at the results of the Nov. 7 
election. Many districts had uncontested 
school board elections. With a few excep- 
tions, school district referenda failed over 
much of the county. How docs one inter- 
pret such results? Is the public uninterest- 
ed in the local control a school board pro- 
vides? Is the public unwilling to pay for 
any additional taxes? 

In my district, Lake Villa 41, the public 
voted to increase their taxes for fire pro- 
tection but not for the education of the 
community's children. I interpret this as 
the public desiring somebody else to pay 
for education. Who else is there? There is 
no one, other than the property taxpayer 
that a school board can ask for additional 
monies. Get the state to pay for education? 
Where do you think the state gets its 
money? Most property taxpayers also pay 



state income and sales tax, two Ideas that 
have been proposed to fund schools. 

Let's say the public is unwilling to sup- 
port school districts full of bureaucrats 
with fat-laden budgets. In my district, we 
have one bureaucrat in a school of 820 
children (find that somewhere else in the 
county). By law, school districts must 
make budgets available to the public and 
hold a public hearing on such before 
adoption. Here is the opportunity for the 
community to ask questions and point out 
any sorcaUcd fat Yet at the public hearing 
for Dist 41 's budget there was no public 
present and no concerns raised. 

- Outside Dist 41 we have an organiza- 
tion that is supposed to be for better edu- 
cation and sensible taxes. They criticized 
the district in the recent referendum cam- 
paign. Yet I have not seen these individu- 
als at the above-mentioned budget hear : 
ing, the previous tax levy hearing or any of 
the public meetings of discussion leading 
up to the decision to ask the public for 
additional taxes. Most noticeably lacking 
were any of these individuals on the ballot 
for school board positions. 

In Dist 41, four scats were up far elec- 
tion. It was an uncontested election. If this • 
above mentioned group could have found 
four individuals, actually living in the dis- 
trict willing to run, they could have gotten 
them elected and taken control of the 
board, and shown all of us who have been 
willing to serve over the years how to do 
things better. 

Soon the Lake Villa community will be 
getting new fire trucks or ambulances. Fire 
protection is important in any community 
and should be supported. Is the education 
of our children any less deserving of sup- 
port? The Lake Villa Dist 41 board needs 
to go back to the community in the spring 
and community needs to support the dis- 
trict Members of the community need to 
get as involved with finding solutions as 
they arc with finding criticisms. 

Roberta L. Ouper 
Lake Villa 




COUNTY LvkctANtl Newspapers DecEMbc* 15, 1 995 



Mullenix proposes 'concealed 
carry' law in Dist 52 race 



Grayslake attorney faces 
Mark Beaubien in house race 



RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 




Editor In Chief 

Republican candidate for state representative of 
the 52nd district Philip A. Mullenix plans to wage an 
aggressive campaign in the GOP primary with a con- 
servative platform which 
includes advancement of "con- 
sW ccalcd carry" legislation. 

'^ a Jl.^l Mullenix faces Harrington 

T'^ ^?| lawyer Mark Beaubien in the 

Republican primary, March 19. 
"I want to serve the people 
and not be served by the peo- 
ple," said Mullenix. 

Mullenix has been a 
Grayslake resident since the 
Mullonlx early 1990s and has served on 

the village plan commission and zoning board of 
appeals since 1993. lie ran for village trustee on the 
slate of former Mayor Marv Smith in 1993. 

A graduate of Northwestern University and John 
Marshall Law School, Mullenix is a founding partner 
of The Ccmcrc Group, Ltd., which provides private, 
legal and corporate investigative services. The firm is 
based in Glcnvicw. 

The conservative Republican candidate says his 
experience as a private investigator will give him a 
unique perspective as a state representative. 

"I deal with thieves and criminals and that makes 
me immensely well qualified to argue on the house- 
floor," Mullenix said. 

According to Mullenix, the Illinois Mouse of 
Representatives has become a battleground for 
Minority Leader Mike Madigan in his effort to return the 
Democrats to powcrand reverse the gains of November 
1 994. Disinformation has been spread across the State 
through partisan mailings containing half-truths about 
Republican members of the House. The result has been 
the resignation of several House members and a 
demeaning of the political process In VHinoVs. 

During the campaign, Mullenix plans to focus on 
several key issues including crime prevention and the 
advancement of "concealed cany" legislation. With 
the passage of such legislation, citizens would be 
allowed to carry a concealed weapon on their person 
after applying for a permit and participating in safety 
instruction and training. 

"It would be similar to a drivers license where an 
individual has to meet specific criteria and be tested 
before being allowed to cany a weapon," said 
Mullenix. "We must stop violent crime and all the law 



enforcement in the world will not protect a person 
facing a criminal on the street. Violent crime contin- 
ues to increase. I support the concealed carry law for 
self-defense purposes." 

Mullenix is also campaigning on a platform that 
includes a call for reduction in state spending and a 
lowering of taxes. He supports further reforms in 
medical malpractice legislation and prosecution of 
fraudulent workers compensation claims. 1 1c is also 
campaigning on confronting teen drug abuse. 

"Teen drug use has doubled since 1992," Mullenix 
said. "Wc have to confront this problem and make a 
difference." 

Mullenix has a very firm stance on the issue of 
abortion. "I believe in abortion only when the moth- 
er's life is in danger," Mullenix said. That is the only 
circumstance under which he believes abortion 
should be legal. 

The Republican candidate also has strong views 
on education reform and supports repealing Goals 
2000 and the concept of outcome based education. 

"Outcome based education is not the way to train 
young minds," said Mullenix. "Wc need to encourage 
achievement not bring scores down to meet the low- 
est achievers." 

He believes it is wrong for the state and federal .. 
government to mandate educational outcomes and 
feels decisions arc best left to the local school board. 

"Wc need to emphasize the fundamentals in edu- 
cation," Mullenix said. "We need to impose. higher 
standards in public education.'* 

Mullenix says his candidacy can be summed-up 
with one thought, "My view of government is that it 
should provide an environment in which families and 
businesses can prosper," Mullenix said. "I am an- 
advocate of rugged individualism." 

Foundation continues support 
for LaCASA Children's programs 

For the second year in a row, LaCASA, The Lake 
County Council Against Sexual Assault, has received 

a 520,000 fitarvt, fiom Tho tilowltx IVld E « w »y 

Foundation to support its ongoing Children s 
Programs, including sexual abuse education, pre- 
vention and intervention services. 

LaCASA's Children's Services include Individual, 
and group counseling, medical and legal advocacy sup- 
port, and a personal safety program provided to all Lake 
County school children along with their parents and 
teachers, LaCASA has serviced over 19,000 people in 
the last year through their comprehensive programs. 

For information about how to become a LaCASA 
supporter or volunteer, call 244-1 107. 






Challenges await new 
United Way president 

GLORIA DAVIS ■ _ 

Staff Reporter 

After serving United Way of Lake County.ln many volunteer 
capacities for almost 10 years, David J. Thompson has taken 
over as chairman the board of the* United Way of Lake County, 
for 1995-96, replacing Daniel J. LaVlsta former College of Lake 
County head. 

Thorripson said, "Wc will continue to face challenges in 
meeting the human service needs of the people of Lake County 
and United Way provides an excellent vehicle for making the ' 
difference." 

He added, "I hope to see that the organization and its 
resources will continue to grow and in turn provide greater sup- 
port to the agencies that serve this community. " 

Although Thompson was born and raised on a farm in 
Wisconsin, Baron County to be exact, he has lived and worked in 
Illinois since 1964. 

"Being a farm boy, I was always interested in animals and 
intended to raise dairy cattle when I grew up," said Thompson. 
But things changed when he attended the University of 
Wisconsin at Madison where he became more interested in the 
research end of bio-chemistry, in which ho received a PhD. 

He came to Illinois and the University of Chicago to get an 
MBA and then to Penn State for a degree in Industrial market- 
ing. 

• Thompson started out as a research scientist for the 
International Mineral Chemical Corp. soon to become part of 
IMG Global. He also served In technical services, sales manage- 
ment, general management, joining Pitman Moore, Inc. which 
through corporate merging was known as.Mallinckrodt 
Veterinary at the time of his retirement three years ago in 1992. 
Although Skoklc was his first Illinois residence, ho has lived in 
the Mundelcln-LlbcrtyviUe area for the last 30 years. [ 

Thompson's wife, Virginia, is a retired teacher, having served 
also in an administrative capacity at both the College of Lake 
County and Saulk Valley Jr. College. His son, Keith, is an engi- 
neer for the Ford Motor Co. and His other son, Craig, is doing ". 
molecular genetic research at Yale University. 

Thompson brings to this new office many years of varied 
experience both in business and on the bqard of United Way. • 
Serving as the chief executive officer of Lake County's United 

Wuy should keep Thompson, pretty busy, not only prosit! in^ oval* 
the board meetings, but also attending eam*»»l*«*-» «»««*i*»R-i'»««» '*■ 

has just returned from a United Way meeting in Washington as 
part of his travel commitment in connection with the United 
Way of America* * 

As if all this isn't enough to keep a retired person busy, 
Thompson Is an avid runner and he runs competitively In the 
interest of staying fit. He and his wife also have a common inter- 
est in genealogy and spend many hours in libraries and court- 
houses constructing their family tree. It would seem that 
Thompson might be busier in his retirement than some who arc 
still working full time. 






■ 



" . , » .. 




on the 

Ritz 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 




*&? 




DEIXIXE PARTY PACKAGE INCLUDES: 

•Open bar from 8:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. wilh hoi and cold hoes d'ocuvrcs 
•Complete Prime Rib or Orange Roughy Dinner 



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•Three hours open bar after dinner 
•Party favors, hats <fc horns 
•Champagne toast at midnight 

paneine 



95 



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Tax St gratuity Included 



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New Year'* Eve Packije. Include* one queen roe bed, rwimminE pod , whirlpool and nuoa privilcgr! 



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For Reservations, Call 

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Libertyville 





DEctMbcn1¥, 1999 LaIceIancJ Newspaper COUNTY" 



QBE 



From page Bl 

preaching to the choir," said Ken Barker, 

host of American News and Views, which 

sponsored the program. "There was a wide 

range of people in attendance including 

teachers, administrators and school board 

members." 

Karen Hayes, who mediated the confer- 
ence's panel discussion, said most atten- 
dees were seeking information on how to 
identify OBE in the classroom. 

Crane is co-sponsor of House BUI 1883, 
"The Back to Basics Education Reform Act' 
The act repeals Goals 2000 and returns con- 
trol of schools to a local level. 

The House did not include any funding 
in their FY 96 budget for Goals 2000," said 
Crane. The Senate proposed $310 million in 
funding for the program. The exact amount 



will be negotiated in the coming weeks. 

"The standard of achievement needed to 
receive a high school diploma prior to World 
War II is what we use today for college grad- 
uation," said Crane. "We need to reinforce a 
back to the basics approach to education 
and require excellence in education." 

Crane believes the objectives of Goals 
2000 arc vague and meaningless to students. 

The term Outcome Based Education is 
not a part of Goals 2000, but dearly, there 
arc parallels between Goals 2000 and me 
implementation of OBE The concept just 
doesn't make sense." 

From a state legislative standpoint, Salvi 
said he has been working continually to 
revamp the state educational system. 
However, he is not pleased to see the efforts 
of the general .assembly thwarted by the 



State Board of Education and Its policies on 
curriculum The State Board of Education is 
not controlled by the house and senate, but 
rather by the governor. Incidentally, 
Governor Jim Edgar has appointed Lt 
Governor Bob Kustra to be his point man in 
implementing the Goals 2000 program in 
Illinois. 

Salvi said the fruits of Outcome Based 
Education are already obvious in the test 
scores, which he said have been on the 
decline in Illinois for the past 20 years. He 
also cited the presence of remedial classes 
offered in both high schools and colleges to 
help students who did not leam their expect- 
ed tasks, yet were passed on to the higher 
level Salvi used that scenario as an example 
to illustrate the failure of Outcome Based 
Education and it emphasis on self esteem 



and value systems. Salvi said the outcome of 
the philosophy is a student who feels a false 
sense of pride in their accomplishments 
because they have not been prompted to 
leam from their failures. 

"If you do well, you succeed. If you do 
pooriy, you fail," Salvi suggested as a proper 
approach. 

Salvi believes the people of Illinois can 
win the battle against "dumbing down" the 
students if they become active and have less 
faith in the system for taking care of their 
every need. 

"The reason OBE is taking hold is apathy. 
People put too much faith in the govern- 
ment, m politicians and in teachers. We have 
to take responsibility for our children. We 
have to read to them when we are tired," 
Salvi concluded. 



■' 



i'.?-,: Vjy..-Av.-v*>';^ 



B 





Uttlll 



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Ritz 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



i 



'■■: 



,-; 



THE 




BANQUET CENTER 



L 



■-■;:■■ -■ ..;■■?:{. 




!f£ Waterfalls -§ 

New Years Eve Specials 




•unm,* 



•Dinner 

•Open Bar 9:30-1:30 
•Champagne Toast 
atMidnight 
•Party Favors 
•2DJ's 

ipO\J per person 

(gratuity not Included) . 



$39.95 plus tax & tip. Includes Hors d'oeuvres 

wnllml teA c<v rVt tti1% Wlth Tvr^ iTitiiiiri Un^"«*«, wine 

with'olfMicrinill severi^urae^aliihcrs 

•Prime Ribs of Beef -New York Strip Steak •Swordflsh 
Champagne Toast at 12:00 

DANCING 

Hats, Horns, Nolsemakers, 
Hors d'eouvres at 8; Dinner at 9 

1290 S. Milwaukee Ave., Iibertyville 

708-362-1290 



Buffet Dinner Includes 

Prime Rib Baked Ham Grecian Chlckm 

Peel & Eat Shrimp Fried Calamari Spinach Lasagna 

Chicken Jean Bart. Shrimp Dejcrngjae. Whlte&ah.aald. 

seafood Pasta Medallions of Veal ~ Baked Potatoes 

BBQ Baby Back Ribs Medallions of Pork Rfcc Vegetables 

Soup & Salad Bar, Ruii& Dessert Ta We 
Beer, Wine & Soda served during dinner. 

COME RING IN THE NEW YEAR WTFH US! 

d* Q C Reservations Only 

q>0 O per person Must Pre . p 

(gratuity not Included) for (ma \ q QK OOIO 
open bar only 9:30-1:30 I'UO/ OVD-Z/.IZ, 

24436 W. Rte. 173. Antloch 



C^ieif-ate, J\l&w tfe,a?°g 



At Manfred's. 

in the 

Mundeleln, IL 



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N» ots 





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42 1 W. RflWn3 Road 
Round Lake Beach 




CowtlidwfecHMitFuir 
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CASH BAR - SPECIAL 
DINNER MENU AVAILABLE 



Manfred's 



"Open on 
. Christmas Dayl 
, Located at Rt. ,45 . & 83 Dinner Specials 

Restaurant opens Q^-Q "5100 Year's Oaf 



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Drill) fttjoo Per Couple^ Rj 

Come Join Us For ^ 

!, Buffet Dinner 

Is 4 Gaines of Bowling 

% 3 Hours of Open Bar 

lUve Band (Hot Hole Plumbers) 

Is Dancing 

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RESERVE NOW -546-2? 12 



Come To Kristofs, Etijotf 
Coot> ¥oot>, Coob trienbs 
Ant> H*ve A OreM Timet 

^Kristof's Is A Participating Establishment In The 

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All DZGN8D Drivers will Receive 

FREE Non-Alcoholic Beverages During^ 

Their Stay New Year's Eve. We 

Require Payment In Full 

Upon Registration. 



Sunday Brunch Dec 24, I0am-2pnu Dinners From Noon, Regular & Holiday Menu 

Monday, Dec 25 Dinners Noon-9pm, Special Holiday Menu 

Tuesday, Dec26 Lunch 1 lam-4pm, Dinners 4pm-9pm 

-NEWYEARS- 

Sunday Branch, Dec 31 lOam^pm, Dinners at Noon 
Monday, ]aii.l Dinners Noon-9pm 



(jrclrf* vucktiid* Martiiie lief. 2 ilim Uti. ' 



*Q 



m 



>iT» 



-Seais Mansion New Year's Eve- 
Brunch lOam-Zpra 
Dinners Noofl-opm 
Pbis: farSpdrfNcv Yean tot Mautjrm 6pn 

ItodngbD9pai»fto,ftisHu^Et 



REG. HOURS: 




Luai,'foe.-SaLH ; 3 
Laity Dinna Tuci-Sa. W 

0tnnftTte.4lLUB.6-10 
Fri.fiSa.6-ll 

Sun.Noon-9 

Sunday fcuai 10-2 



-Banquet Baildlng- 

UKltetUsi 
Cocitdf l Hoi mam M S, Due; u 9 
KfrdCtftaiett 
•PtwTadaioofBtt 
•CokhnarLctoU 
Fil 7 Come torn CooW To Ton (Kia 
»UnBn^eJ Cod&ns with ftgihm Ljqjbots 
•UiEnHWiDeWkYflQr Diner' 

i flunpgiv frag a Ukfofo 

•HavHonNoceBabx&L 

. IOOWMfi0|WH 



County *>pte 

^^lirjrf&i^urt/jtilitiri 
Gwtow diniq in (k Vtskf Stan County Estate 




223-0121 

Intersections Routes 120 & 45-CraysJake 

Yoiir Hosts, Bill and Kris Govas Aiwaj* Gain tab a^ 




Cosed 

SSSH 



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[J W'J 




HEALTH WATCH UldArd Nevks|>a(>crs Deceiver 15, 1995 




Wmm I 



Hospital 



Narcotics Anonymous 

Will meet every 
Wednesday, 7 to 9 p.m., In 
the Physician's Dining 
Room. Call 3G0-2649. 

AIco h olics Anonymous 

Meets every Tuesday and 
Friday, 7 to 8 p.m., hi the 
Private Dining Room. Call 
360-2649. 

Cardiac Care club 

The Cardiac Care Club 
will meet the third Thursday 
of each month, 7 p.m., at the 
Heart Center of liikc 
County. Tliis educational 
and social group will pro- 
vide you with information 
about heart disease, choles- 
terol, stress management 
and other related topics. 
For more information call ' 
244-5900. 



LaIve Gouintv H &uilf 
;■ - DEpT. 



Immunization clinics 

The Lake County Health 
Dcpt. offers immunization 
clinics for Lake County chil- 
dren. Childhood immuniza- 
tion clinics will be held at the 
following locations. A parent 
or guardian must accompa- 
ny all children: 

Lake County Health 
Dcpt., Belvidere Medical 
BIdg., 2400 Belvidere Rd., 
Waukegan, every Monday 
from 1 to 3 p.m.; Tuesday, 8 
to 10 a.m.; and Thursday 
from 1 to 3 p.m. No appoint- 
ment Is necessary. 



LaI<e Forest 
HospiTAl . 



Bereavement support 

Losing a friend or relative 
at any age is an emotional 
and often times a devastat- 
ing experience. Lake Forest 
Hospital offers two support 
groups to families who 
experience grieving at the 
loss of a loved one or family 
member. The Bereavement 
Support Group meets the 
second and fourth Monday 
of each month at 7:30 p.m. 
in the library at Westmore- 
land. Nursing Center, which 
Is located on the campus of 
Lake Forest Hospital Call 
234-5600, ext 6446 for fur- • 
thcr information. « 



Breast cancer support 

Being diagnosed with 
- breast cancer is an emotion- 
al turning point in a worn- % 
an's life. There arc many 
changes that occur not only 
physically but also emotion- 
ally. Family relationships, 
sexuality, diet and exercise 
arc sOrrie of the concerns of 
those affected by breast 
cancer. The Oncology Dcpt 
of Lake Forest Hospital 
offers a free Breast Cancer 
Support Group that pro- 
vides information, educa- 
tion and emotional support 
'to women diagnosed with 
breast cancer. Led by an 
• oncology nurse and medical 
■social worker, the group will 
meet on the first and third 
: Wednesday, of each month ; 
from 7 to 8 p.ni in the 
Conference Center of the 
{hospital For further infor- 
mation call 234-5600 



Influenza-like respiratory illness on the rise 



Ukc County may experience a surge in 
respiratory illnesses within the next two to 
three weeks, according to Surveillance Data, 
Inc. (SDI). Residents of Lake County, particu- 
larly those at increased risk of contracting the 
flu, arc strongly encouraged to discuss pre- 
vention and treatment options with their 
physician. 

Often mistaken for the common cold, 
influenza begins with symptoms including 
the sudden onset of fever, muscle and body 
aches, cough, sore throat, headache and 
chills. Those exhibiting flu-like symptoms 
should consult their physician as soon as pos- 
sible to determine if they have influenza and 
which course of therapy may be appropriate. 

The Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination 
as the primary method of flu prevention. In 
addition, prescription antivirals such as 



Flumadinc® (rimantadine HCl) can be used 
to treat and prevent influenza A in adults and 
(he elderly, and to prevent influenza A in chil- 
dren. 

When given to infected adults within 48 
hours after symptoms begin, Flumadinc can 
help patients feel better on day two of treat- 
ment. "Antivirals are effective for treating 
influenza type A In adults. These agents 
reduce the severity of symptoms and shorten 
the duration of influenza illncss-whlch with- 
out treatment can last more than seven days," 
said Steven R. Mostow, M.D., chairman of the 
department of medicine at Rose Medical 
Center in Denver and professor of medicine 
at the University of Colorado Health Sciences 
Center. 

"Once the flu hits an area, it spreads rapid- 
ly from person to person unless appropriate 
preventive measures arc taken throughout 



the community," he explained. 

According to the CDC, Influenza preven- 
tion and treatment measures should begin 
in October and continue throughout the flu 
season. Early notification of when flu is like- 
ly to strike an area helps warn the medical 
community when to expect periods of 
increased visits and may help patients ben- 
efit from vaccination and /or prevention 
with an antiviral medication in the weeks 
before the flu hits. 

In controlled clinical trials with 
Flumadinc, the most common side effects 
included insomnia, dizziness and nausea, 
each of which generally occurred in less than 
3 percent of patients. Flumadinc is available 
by prescription only and should not be taken 
by people who have had a previous adverse 
reaction to Symmetrel® (amantadine) or 
Flumadinc (rimantadine). 



HEALTH WATCH 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Christmas Seal campaign urges kids to help kids 



Since its founding 91 years 
ago, the American Lung 
Association has recognized the 
toll lung disease can take on chil- 
dren and has worked to educate 
the public on preventing and 
treating breathing problems. 
This holiday season, the 
American Lung Association of 
Illinois will focus on children and 
lung disease during its annual 
fundraising Christmas Seal 
Campaign®. 

The story of Christmas Seals 
began in 1907, when the first 
Seals were printed and sold for a 
penny apiece to raise money to 
fight tuberculosis. Since then, tiic 
American Lung Association has 
raised millions of dollars through 
the sale of Christmas Seals and 
still relics primarily on these 
funds to support its fight against 
lung disease. All donations 
received through Christmas Seals 
help support the American Lung 
Association's educational pro- 
grams, advocacy efforts and sci- 
entific research. 

The American Lung 
Association, in partnership 
with the National Education 
Association Health 

Information Network and the 
Triaminic® Parents Club, 
invite children ages six to 15 to 
enter the 1995 Christmas Seals 
Kids' Drawing Contest by 
drawing what "Feeling Good 
During the Holidays" means to 
them. Children will compete 
on the state level for a My First 
Sony® Personal Electronic 
Sketch Pad. 

The Grand Prize winner will 
receive an Intel® Personal 
Computer, color inkjet printer 
and graphics software. Winning 
drawings will be chosen from 
each of the 50 states, plus the 



District of Columbia, Puerto 
Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, 
and from the American military 
families living abroad. 

The states' winning artwork 
may be featured on the 1997 



Christmas Seal sheet. Triaminic® 
Parents Club will donate $1 to the 
Lung Association for every draw- 
ing entered in the contest. All 
entries must be received by 
March 31, 1996. 



For more information about 
lung disease, Christmas Seals, or 
the coloring contest, contactyour 
local American Lung Association 
at 1-800-LUNG-USA (1-800-586- 
4872). 




Going-home gifts 

Mary Butler of Lake Villa (left), Chris Fassblnder of Antloch, Kris Caen of Kenosha and Carroll 
Williams of Bensenvllle display a "Care Package" donated by the Systems Menu Expansion 
Department of Abbott Laboratories. The packages are given to children to go through same- ' 
day surgery at Victory Memorial Hospital. 



Hospice offers seminar on dealing with grief 



The Hospice of Northeastern 111. is pre- 
senting a seminar, "The Helper's Journey. 
Finding the Balance," on Friday, Dec. 15 from 
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Uslc/NapervUle Hilton 
in Lisle. Working with people facing grief, loss 
and life-limiting illness poses great challenges 
for helpers and helping teams. This seminar 
will provide physicians, nurses, hospital and 
long term care staff, social workers, thera- 
pists, clergy and volunteers with information 
on addressing the issues of conflict, stress and 
burnout. The $29 registration fee includes 
continental breakfast,. lunch and materials. 



Reservations are required by Dec. 11. 

Dale G. Larson, Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley, will be the guest lecturer 
for this one day seminar. A nationally recog- 
nized psychologist and author for his. work in 
this field, Dr. Larson lectures, offers experien- 
tial exercises, humor and group discussion in 
order to support, stimulate and rejuvenate 
caregivers in their work. 

Established in 1984, the Hospice of 
Northeastern 111. is an independent, commu- 
nity-based, . not-for-profit, 
Medicare/ Medicaid certified hospice with 



offices located in Barrlngton, Woodstock, and 
the recently opened office jn Wheaton. 
Supporting the Hospice of Northeastern 111. as 
sponsors for this event arc: Health Units, inc., 
Omnlcare Pharmacies of 111., Oxysound Home 
Health Agencies, Janssen Pharmaceutica, and 
Lang Home Medical Equipment, In. Six con- 
tinuing education units for social workers will 
be provided by the National Association of 
Social Workers, Illinois chapter. 

For information regarding this seminar, 
call Lisa Sullivan in the Barrlngton office at 
381-5599. 



Decemder 15, 1999 UIceIanc) Newspapers 1AKEUFE 




l?F 



children 



RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 
Editor In Chief : ; 

In Norman Rockwell's holi- 
day photos every American fami- 
ly has one dad, one mom and a 
peaceful holiday celebration. 
With the national divorce rate at 
nearly 50 percent many families 
find themselves dealing with the 
question of where will be home 
for the holidays. 

The issue can lead to emer- 
gency court custody hearings, 
bitter arguments and hard feel- 
ings. 

"It can be a nightmare and 
parents often feel they have no 
control," said Mclanic Dillon, a 
licensed clinical professional 
counselor. * Parents need to do 



things which arc realistic and to 
remember that they are the 
adults In the situation." 

Dillon recommends divorced 
parents look at the situation in 
term of what is realistic for the 
children. 

"Families need to reexamine 
their purpose for participating in 
holiday events," Dillon said. 
"Parents need to keep in mind 
although they may have issues 
with their former partners, they 
should riot burden the children 
with those issues." Dillon sug- 
gests parents look at the situation 
from an objective point of view 
and do what they can jointly 
agree is best for the child. 

For many parents who have 



trouble dealing with custody 
arrangements, the issue is often 
not the event, according to 
Dillon. 



Heme fcp 
fche Holidaua 



adults involved have to learn to 
resolve the Issues of their rela- 
tionship and should ask them- 
selves whether or not it is worth 
the pain they are causing the chil- 
dren to maintain their ground." 

Dillon cautions parents that a 
failure to work out their differ- 
ences will lead to negative mem- 
ories of the holidays for children. 

"The child will not have fond 



parents be willing to compromise 
on their own traditions if they are 
not realistic for their family each 
year. 

"The most important thing to 
do Is to take the children into 
consideration and put them 
first," Dillon said. 

Divorce is not the only reason 
for a change in family celebra- 
tion. For a family experiencing 



memories of the holidays if they the holiday season for the first 



only remember the stress and 
fighting caused by the holiday 
season," Dillon said. "A lot of 
times kids feel responsible for the 
fighting and unhappincss espe- 
cially If they are used as a bar- 



"If it is an issue of power and 
control, than it will always be a gaining chip. 
difficult event," said Dillon. "The The counselor also 



suggests 



time following the loss of a family 
member, Dillon cautions families 
not to be afraid of letting go of 
traditions for the first year or 
longer. 

"Families can acknowledge 
their . loss and do something 
See CHILDREN page B21 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Adventurer shares history 
as Civil War soldier 



STEVE PETERSON 



Staff Reporter 

Some five years ago, Paul Habcl caught the Civil War 

bug. 

"It was something I was interested in and I wanted to 
learn more about the Civil War so the best -way to learn 
Iwiwby doing." Habcl said. 

The Vernon Hills engineer joined a Civil War re- 
enactment group, and lived the. life that thousands of 
Union troops did in the- 1861-1865 war between the 
states. 

"There were 600,000 casualties in the war, and two- 
thirds were from disease because they did not know how 
to handle it," Habcl said. 

Six to eight summer weekends a year, Habcl reports 
: to his Civil War group for re-enactment exercises or dis- 
cussions. He was one of 5,000 Civil war enthusiasts who 
had a part in the filming of "Gettysburg", which depict- 





ed the war's turning point battle. 

Students at Woodland Middle School and other 
schools have learned the details as Habcl paid a visit 
to social studies classes. 

For example, the shoes, known as Brogans, were 
the first to distinguish, between left or right feet. 

Metal horacahnc* helped mate thom marc wear- 
able. 

Hats were different in* the western battles than. 
those on the East Coast Soldiers fighting the war in 
Tennessee and Georgia favored a hardy hat with a 
different style brim. 

The ammunition was developing to new tcch> 
nology as the war began. The problem was the old 
tactics of lining up and shooting at one another 
were still being used, the Gages Lake students 
learned. 

"The cannon was the deadliest weapon of the 
war because it was used at such close 
range," Habel said. 

War was a Iearning-on-the-job expe- 
rience for many. They learned the impor- 
tance of capping one's rifle because if 
you just put bullets in the barrel, the gun 
powder may explode and you would have 
to buy a new $13 rifle. Soldiers at the 
time were paid $13 a month. 

"One of the requirements for being a p au | Habel, a member of a Civil War reenactment group,' 
soldier was to have your front teeth. If explains To students how soldiers loaded their muskets.—: 
you did not have your front teeth, you Photo by Undo Chapman 
could not bite off the cap to load a gun. 



Vernon Hills engineer Paul Habel relives the Civil War In 
with students.— Photo by Linda Chapman 



his talks 



The powder would go in first, then the ball 
would be pushed to the bottom by a ramrod 
and then soldiers would cock the hammer 
one time for your safety. A good soldier 
could fire three rounds a minute. Today you 
have machine guns which could fire 10 or 20 
rounds a second. This was very long and dif- 
ficult. The problem is themorc you fire the 
gun, the dirtier the barrel gets. The bullets 
will not be rammed down as easily. 

"For close- range fighting, you had the 
bayonet. It is a very dull knife. It is not. real 
sharp. If you get stabbed with a sharp knife, it 
heals and you arc fine. If you get stabbed with 
a dull knife, it makes a dirty knife, it may get 
infected. In the Civil War close combat rarely 
happened. By the time the armies got close 
together, one side would, break and run," 
Habcl described. 

Bayonets are mainly used as scare tactics, 
he said. Other usc,s are for cooking and light. 

Soldiers learned to carry what they need- 
ed, Habel told the interested students. This 
included a blanket, a rubberized coat that 
could be worn as a poncho, and a pup tent. 
Also carried were a canteen for water and a 



sack for food items. • - «, 

One hardship was trying to obtain fresh food. 
Without today's modem methods, meat would arrive to 
the soldiers spoiled. They would have to boil it before 
consumption. Soldiers were given a half-pound of heav- 
ily-salted meat a day. 

Then there was the nasty "snack" known as hardtack. 
Made of water, salt and flour, the combination was so 
hard it could prevent bullets from penetrating. "They ate 
about six or eight of those a day," Habel said. 

The medical profession cared deeply about the sol- 
diers, but could do little for an injured man. If hit in the 
arm or leg by a bullet, the extremity was usually cut off. 
That is unless gangrene set in. The cancer-like disease 
almost always meant certain death. 

There was a one in 10 chance of getting killed in bat- 
Ue, one in three chance of being injured. 

"Soldiers wrote home very often because they were 
homesick," he said. Soldiers did have chances to visit 
their families five days at a time, but many did hot return 

to service. 

Families, in fact, sometimes did not know about the 
status of their members until much later after a battle. 
The commander would write letters to families, a prac- 
tice which continues today. 

Habcl's uniform was a replica of the Civil War days. 




{J LAKE LIFE UeIancI Newspapers DeccMbu 15, 199$ 



-Kids Fare— — — — — 

Winter comes to life at Lake County Museum 



Join . the Lake County 
Museum staff for an afternoon of 
interactive fun at Stories, Poems 
and Rhymes of the Season on 
Dec. 21 and 20 from 1:30 to 4 
p.m. at the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' Lake County Muse- 
um. 

On Dec. 21, children will 
enjoy acting out and listening to 
wintertime stories and rhymes, 
with a special focus on tradition- 
al Christmas and Hanukkah talcs. 
A focus on the African -American 
celebration, Kwanzaa, and the 
New Year will round out the pro- 
gram on Dec. 28. 

Children also have the chance 
to show their creativity as they 
decorate and later break a festive 
pinata. Snacks will be provided 
and there will be time to view the 
museum galleries and enjoy 
some quiet time at both pro- 
grams. 

The programs arc for children 
ages 10 and under and the cost 
for each is $3. Reservations are 
required. The Lake County 
Museum is located in Lakcwood 
Forest Preserve on Rtc. 176. 

For more information call 
526-7878. 

Sleepy bear 

Papai Players will present 
"The Bear Who Slept Thru 



Christmas" through Dec. 30 at 
Cutting Hall in Palatine. 

Scheduled performances arc: 

. Dec. 16 at 10 a.m.; Dec 27 at 

10:30 a.m.; Dec. 28 at 10:30 am,; 

Dec. 29 at 10:30 a.m.; and Dec 30 

at 10:30 am. 

Ticket price is $5 in advance, 
$6 at the door. The theatre opens 
one half-hour prior to the show 
for seating. To reserve tickets call 
359-9556. 

Cutting Hall is located at 150 
East Wood St. in Palatine. 

'Family Day Sundays' 

Explore local history and tra- 
ditions with the staff and volun- 
teers of the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' Lake County Museum 
at Family Day Sundays. • 

join other families in the 
museum's galleries for exciting 
family-oriented activities such as 
participating in a scavenger hunt, 
making a bookmark, creating a 
memory game, or learning about 
African American history. 
Focusing on a different activity 
each week, Family Day Sundays 
will be held every Sunday from 1 
to 4 p.m. 

There will be no activities 
Dec. 24. 

General admission to the 
museum is $2 for adults and $1 
for youth ages 4 to 18. 



Reservations arc not required. 
The Lake County Museum Is 
located in Lakcwood Forest 
Preserve on Rtc. 176, Just west of 
Fairfield Road near Wauconda. 

For more information call 
526-7870. 

'Beauty and the Beast' 

Northbrook Theatre's 

Children's Company will present 
a musical version of "Beauty and 
the Beast" through Dec. 17. 
Several shows will be staged. 
Performance dates and times arc 
as follows: Dec. 16 at 10:30 am., 2 
and 7 p.m.; and Dec. 17 at 12:30 
and 4 p.m. 

All scats arc reserved and arc 
priced at $5. The Northbrook 
Theatre is located at 3323 Walters 
Ave. in Northbrook. Call 291-2367 
for tickets and more information. 

Plnocchlo conies to life 

The Marriott Lincolnshire 
Theatre for Young Audiences 
presents Pinocchio through Dec. 
30 with varying performance 
times most Mondays and 
Fridays at 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. 
and Saturdays at 11 a.m. or 1:30 
p.m. 

Individual ticket prices are $6 
and arc available by calling the 
box office at 634-5909.— by 
RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 



■ 



Help s 






Lake County residents lootdngfor a way to share their good 
fortune and holiday cheer should know about the LaCASA 
"Holiday Family Wish list" program. 

The annual 'Holiday Family Wish List* program alms at , 
gathering donations of cash, gift certificates, and new clothing 
and gift 'items to benefit families which have been In need of 
LaCASA's services during the year. The program's goal. Is to 
raise a total of $1,500 to $2,000 in donations and gifts to benefit 
20 families throughout Lake County. 

Some suggestions for donations are: Movie tickets for fami- 
lies; restaurant/grocery 'store certificates; book store certificates; 
ibr women, pajamas/nightgowns, bathrobes, wallets, purses, 
sweatsuits, socks, bath products/toiletries; for children, toys 
(board games, crayons, coloring books, puzzles), pajamas, ■ 
underwear, socles,' coats /jackets, sweatsuits, shoes/boots; for 
infants, baby toys prattles, stiiffcd animals); pajamas, T-shirts, 
blankets, jumpers, snbwsuits, socks/booties, disposable diapers 
and lotions, powders and brush and comb sets, 

LaCASA is accepting donations for Us "Holiday Family Wish 
List" program from now.until Dec. 19 at its Zachari as Center 
•office, 1 S. Greenicaf St. In Gurnee. For more information call 
Lynn Ruth Haines at 224-1187. 



-;• 



Landecker benefits Lambs Farm 

- 
The sequel has arrived,. .Landecker & The Legends Volume Two. 
John Records Landecker, morning announcer on Oldies 104.3 WJMK, 
has put together a second spectacular collection of parody songs to 
benefit Lambs Farm. The parodies found in the second volume chron- 
icle some of the most sensational political and current events of 1995. 
Songs on Volume Two include "Y-DNA," Polkahantas Polka* and 
"Calling Mel Reynolds." 

More than 2,000 copies of Landecker & The Legends Volume I were 
sold last year, raising over $20,000 for Lambs Farm Landecker & The 
Legends Volume Two is available in cassette for $10 and CD for $15, 
plus tax, shipping and handing. To purchase a copy, call 1-800-52- 
LAMBS or stop by any of Lambs Farm's retail businesses. 




Lakehur<st Mall 






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DcctMbcR 15, 1995 UkelANd Newspapers LAKE LIFE I 




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GIFT PUZZLE 



Unsrambfe 
the letters in 
the boxes to 
find five 
presents 



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LIKE HUMANS BUT 
UNLIKE MOST OTHER 
ANIMALS, BEARS ARE 

PLANTIGRADE; 

THAT IS, THEY 
WALK WITH 
THE SOLE AND 

FIVE TOES OF 
EACH FOOT ALMOST 
FLAT ON THE OROUNP. 
MOST ANIMALS WALK 
ON THEIR TOES. 



Christmas Word Find 

Listed below are words and phrases associated- with 
Christmas. How many can you find and circle in the 
scrambled letter puzzle? The words go horizontally and 
vertically, backwards and forwards, 



MISTLETOE 

PRESENTS 

ANGELS 

CANDYCANE 

TREE 

FEAST 

CAROLING 



STOCKING 

CHURCH 

SANTA 

COOKIES 

REINDEER 

FAMILY 

LIGHTS- 



F 

A 
'M 
I 
*L 
Y 
N 
S 
S 
L 
E 
G 



B 

G 

E 

C 

S 

F 

G 

V 

B 

M 

J 

F 



C 

A 
R 
O 
L 
I 

N 
G 
C 
G 
N 
S 



N W- G 

A F N 



A 
D 
F 
T 
H 
F 
G 
G 
A 



B 
S 
A 
S 
F 
N 
N 
F 
T 



N A" 
W G 
R E 
I E 
S F 
S T 
D R 
H E 
A E 
S G 
H N 
I K 
F G 
N-A 



C 
H 
E 
S 
H 
N 
D 
G 
F 



Y 
G 
D 
D 
G 
E 
N 
G 
W 



D N 
M X 



H N 

N C 

C G 

G N 

S F 



N 

N 

S 

S 

F 

L 

I 

G 



I 

Z 

C 

E 

O- 

T 

E 

L 



H. 


T 


C 


T 


S 


c 


S 


I 


A 


G M 


G 



D H 
A C 
R 
U 
H 
C 



Christmas Scramble 

Christmas is a wonderful holiday. Unscramble the words and see 
if you can complete the Christmas-related sentences below. 



rs 



.. L.Christmas colors are D. BT E and EEEEQ- 

2. A .festive ring or trine,, people put this on their doo 

during ChriilmB^time. .fa, R E &QL X£ - 

3. Santa delivers presents on his laffiQ LEI' 

4. Smaller gifts go in these KSMIQSCIG 

5. People dream of this kind of Christmas. E^llTH. 

6. These make Christmas look a little brighter. You can 
• find them on houses and trees. £ L HI Ql 

7. A traditional Christmas drink. Q E S?£i Q Q 

8. The best place to be for Christmas. EkiidQ 

oiuoH-8 SouSSg-i siuSn "9 ^'MM 'S 

sSupjoojs "f U.3I3IS 'Z W^ifa % U33JQ put? P 3 H ' I 

SJdfnsuy 



PEOPLE • /•«> Z* PEOPLE • A to Z- PEOPLE- 



31 •Walter, Fats: A celebrated jazz pianist, .organist, and 

• composer, Remade hundreds of recordings and made j» 

^ appearances on radio and in.several motion pictures.-.-: JJ 

a •Walters, jfarbara: An accomplished broadcast jour- D 

2 nalisL Barbara, Walters is best'lenown fortferreveal^' 

fi ing iht'ervicws'with celebrities and public'figufes. 

Jf •Warhgt, '•^rufyfiAn American^artistjind filmmaker, 

tjt Andy Warhol was a founder and a' major figure of 

lw the Pop'AH rnoYpment. s 



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•Washington', George: First president of the United 
Stales and chief of the Continental army during the 
American Revolution, he was known as the- "Father 
pj of His Country"-' v& W \r&%>0 ' 

A •Whitman, Walj;.Thoughi of as the greatest of 19th- 
.• century American poets, he ts'knowif fof his unique 
p approach and innovative style. v 



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CLUES ACROSS 

1. King with a golden 

touch 
5. Henry Lodge, 

American politician 

8. Digger of tunnels 

9. Definitive 

10. Summits 

11. Infuse with oxygen 
14. South American 

• - -■ Indian . " ** 

16. Part of a play 

1 7. Lampreys 

20. Voluble,, talkative 

21. Conceived, formed a 
concept 

22. Embarrass, disconcert 

23. Museum of History 

lead '61 

uopovei 

jouaqy 71 

ssaiajsej. 'i 

sng'9 

papuosB3 *g 

sugti > 

pa[00ips £ 

suauja 'Z 

NtMoa sNOixmos 



CLUES DOWN 

1. Type of bungling 

2. Eating area 

3. Educated 

4. Turkish river 

5. Came down like a waterfall 

6. Form of transportation 

7. Bland s 

12. Criminal's assistant 

13, "Lights^ camera,* /" 

15. Tropical fish 

18. Indian nursemaid 

1 9. Mossy fuel 

lEjniBN £Z 

qsnqv 'it 
paicspi '\z 

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The Internet: 

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• Access E-Mail 

• Always a Local Call 



$ 25/month - UNLIMITED ACCESS 



For more information, call: 

tmsES— 

(708)223-8199 

'Call for information about your prefix 




LAKE LIFE UI<eIan<I Newspapers Deceive* 15, 1995. 



F.Y.I. 




'Secret Garden' 

Apple Tree Theatre pre- 
sents the musical "The Secret 
Garden" through Dec. 31. 
Performances arc Wednes- 
days at 7:30 p.m.; Fridays at B 
p.m.; Saturdays at 5:30 and 9 
p.m.; and Sundays at 3 and 7 
p.m. Ticket prices are $25 and 
$28, with senior, student and 
group discounts available. 
For reservations or in forma - 



with a complimentary pass Tor a 
friend included. Adults accompanied 
by children arc free; unaccompanied 
adults arc $1. Call the church at 
(815)337-4673 for more details 
directions. 



or 



tion call 432-4335. 

'All Through the Night' 

Stage Two Theatre, 410 Sheridan 
Kil., Highwood, presents "All Through 
the Night," a Christmas drama, 
through Dec. 31. Performance times 
arc 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays; 8 p.m. 
Fridays and Saturdays; and. 3 p.m. 
Sundays. Tickets arc $12 for adults, 
$10 seniors, students and military; 
and $9 for groups of eight or more. 
Call 432-74G9. 

'Miss Firecracker* 

"The Miss Firecracker Contest" 
will be performed by the University of 
Wisconsln-Parksidc's Theatre DepL 
Dec. 14 at 10 a.m. and Dec 15 and 16 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Studio B Theatre, 
located on the ground floor of the 
Communication Arts Building. Ad- 
mission Is $7 for adults, $6 for senior 
cilir.cns. For tickets call the UW- 
I'arksicJe ticket office between 8 a.m. 
and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at 
(414)595-2564. 

'A Christmas Carol' 

CcntcrS tagc presents "A Christ- 
mas Carol" at the Gorton Community 
Center, 400 E. Illinois Rd., Lake 
Forest, on Dec. 15 at 7 p.m., Dec. 16 at 
1 and 5 p.m., and Dec. 17 at 1 and 4 
p.m. Tickets arc S8 for adults, S6 for 
seniors and children, and may be 
reserved in advance by calling 234- 
601)2. 

'Benjamin' 

The magic of Christmas comes- 
alive with the truth of the gospel in a 
production of "Benjamin and the 
Angel" to . be presented by the 
Woodstock. Community Christian 
Theatre on Dec. 15 at 7:30 p.m. and 
Dec. 16 at 4:30 p.m. at Now Life 
Christian Center, 5115 Dean St., 
Woodstock. Cost Is $1 for children. 






- 



'Spirits' 

Folkslngcrs Kim Hughes, 
Gary Smith and Wayne 
Zumsteln bring their unique 
folk sounds to seasonal 
sounds, sure to put listeners 
Into the true spirit of the holi- 
days on Dec 16 at 7:30 p.m. at 
the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' Lake , County 
Museum. Admission at .the 
door is $5 for adults, $2 for 

children iirid students ages 4 through 

18. Children under 4 enter free. 

Reservations arc not required. Call 

526-787B for further details. 

'Heart of Christmas' 

Nationally renowned singer- 
songwriter Jim Post will bring his 
acclaimed musical show, "The Heart 
of Christmas," to the 90-scat 
rtccl'lcx Theater, 420 W. Dempster 
St., Mt. Prospect, for two shows Dec. 
16 at 3:30 and 7:30 p.m. "The Heart 
of Christmas" tells the story of 
Daniel Christmas Cunningham, 
born three days before Christmas in 
1860 in Galena, III. The show is suit- 
able for the whole family. Tickets are 
$9 in advance for ages 12 to adult or 
$10 at the door; $4 in advance for 
ages 5 to 11 or $5 at the door. Call 
255-5380 for reservations or infor- 
mation. 

'First Christmas' 

Calvary Christian Center 
Sanctuary Choir will present "First 
Christmas" by A Singing Christmas 
Wreath on Dec. 16 and 17 at 6 p.m. 
Calvary Christian Center Is located a5 
134 Monavillc Rd., Lake Villa. Call 
356-6181 for details. 

'Messiah' performed 

The Amioch Community Chorus 
will again present the Christmas por- 
tion oT Handel's "Messiah" at Si. 
Peter Catholic Church, 557 Lake SL, 
Aniioch, on Dec. . 17 at 7:30 p.m. 
Admission is free to the public. This 
production is sponsored by the 
Festival Arts of Antjoch. 



223-8161 



L 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Carnival Crufse Line's Newest Ship - 
The Biggest Of Them All 

by JIM WARNKEN, 

PBESIDENT, NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

On November 10, 1996, Carnival's Destiny, the first crulso ship to top 100,000 gross 
tons, will make It's maiden voyago. 

I'm not really sure Just what '.100,000 Ions' really stands lor, but In comparison todays 
cruise ships run anywhere Irom 13,000 tons (Such as Dolphin Cruise Line's Dolphin IV) to 
around 70,000 tons (Royal Caribbean's Sovereign ot the Seas). Suffice to say this Is one 
big ship! 

Even though this massive boat will carry over 2,500 passengers, It still has a space ration 
of 3B, This number has to do with how much room you'll have without bumping Into anoth- 
er passenger (or something [Ike thai). To compare, Ihe QE 2 has a space ratio of 35, the 
Sovereign of Ihe Seas. 30, and Carnival's own Celebration 32. The higher the better. 

What I think Is going to'make this the hottest ship afloat though, Is 60% of Its cabins will 
have private balconies. The sides ol the balconies will be solid, allowing lor complete pri- 
vacy, while forward panels wilt be clear giving you an unobstructed view of the ocean from 
your sofa In Ihe separate silling area of your 220-square ft. staterooms. 

Since lots of cruisers are taking the kids along, the Destiny will feature special family 
staterooms. These cabins will have ftoor-to-celllng windows providing panoramic ocean 
- views, Instead ol balconies (so you come back with the same number of kids with which 
you left). Connecting cabins wilt also be available. Carnival says it has located the family 
cabins "conveniently near the children's facilities', Quito frankly, I think this Is an attempt 
to loosely confine kids to one area of the ship. 

Along with Carvlnal's complete kid's program called 'Camp Carnival*, the teens will find 
no ordinary video games In the Destiny's game center. Here, they can try their hand al the 
latest In high-tech virtual reality games. 

Of course, there's the adult playroom. The Destiny will feature a 9,000 square foot casi- 
no. 

Outdoor recreation Includes a total ol four pools, one with a three story high water slide. 
In the unlikely even of inclement weather, a retractable Sky Dome can cover the entire pool 
area. 

It's not too early to make your reservations to sail on the Destiny. Remember Carnival's 
guarantoe-tho earlier you book, Ihe more you'll save. 

Mown sm# mt&z ma 



2234 E. Grand Lindenhurst, III. 
24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

(708)356-3010 



*k 



'Access the Arts' 

At 4 p.m. Dec. 17, the Waukcgan 
Symphony Brass Quintet will perform 
In a benefit Christmas concert Inihc 
"Access the Arts" Chamber Ensemble 
Series at First Congregational Church, 
Grand and Ulica, Waukcgan, Tickets 
arc $10 for adults, $a for seniors, dis- 
abled, or students. Tickets may be 
purchased at the door or in advance 
through Lainl Zinn, 336-9503. 



'Spacial Concern 1 

"Spacial Concerns," an 
exhibit featuring the works of 
three artists exploring the use 
of space, physically and con- 
ceptually, will be featured at 
\^ CLC's Community Gallery of 
**• ! Art through Dec. 17. 
Admission to the exhibit is 
free and gallery hours arc 
Jvlonday through Thursday, 8 
a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday, 6 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. 

Indi -Visual Vistas' 

Jhc Harrington Area Arts Council 
announces the opening of its BAAC 
Gallery at the Library exhibit entitled 
"Indi-Vlsual Vistas'* featuring paintings 
by Holly Collins. The exhibit will run at 
the Barrington Area Library through 
Dec. 31 during regular library hours. 



Clay classes offered 

New Century Clayworks, 83 
Ambrogio Dr. in Gurncc, offers clay 
classes for children and adults. 
Registration is now being taken for 
classes that begin In January. Call 
'625-1799. 

'Frost & Fantasies' 

Several of Lakes -Region Water- 
color Guild members are exhibiting 
works at Anderson Arts Center, 121 
66th St. Kenosha. The juried show, 
entitled "Frost St Fantasies," may be 
viewed through Jan. 7. Gallery hours 
arc Thursday through Sunday, 1 to 5 
p.m. For further Information call 
(414)653-0481. 

Water media 

Lilo Torau Is exhibiting waler 
media paintings at the First Star Bank 
on Dccrfleld Road, Just cast of 
Saunders in River Woods, during 
December and January. 






■ y j 

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< 



Promenaders 

The Lake Promenaders 
Square Dance Club Is holding 
a dance on Dec' 16 at- Oak 
Grove School, 1700 S. O'PIainc 
Rd., Libertyvillc. Joyce and 
George Kammcrcr Will be call- 
ing rounds at 7:45 pjn. Herb 
Oestcrlc will be calling 



Pluslcvel Squares at 8:15 p.m For 
' details call 623-6086. 

Singles dance 

All singles are Invited to the 
Combined Club Singles dance at fl 
p.m. on Dec. 16 at The Radisson Hotel 
Northbrook, 2875 N. Milwaukee 
Northbrook. Music will be provided 
By Music In Motion. The event Is co- 
sponsored by the Northwest Singles 
Assn., Young Suburban Singles and 
Singles & Company. Admission is SB 
Call 209-2066 for further information! 

'The Nutcracker' 

The Milwaukee Ballet presents 
Jean-Paul Comelln's "Nutcracker" 
through Dec, 28 at the Performing Arts 

?u l ?, r ' 9 ? !*• Watcr St " Milwaukee. 
Tchaikovsky's score will be performed 
by the Milwaukee Ballet Orchestra 
and Chorus. Performance dates and 
times arc: Dec 15, 7:30 p.m.; Dec 16 
2 and 7:30 p.m.; Dec 17, 2 and 7 p.rrr 
Dec 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 26, 27 and 28 at 
7:30 p.m.; and Dec. 23, 26, 27 and 28 at 
2 p.m. Ticket prices range from S12 to 
S42 and. discounts are available for 
groups of 10 or more. Tickets are 
available through the PAC box office 
929 N. Water St., (414)273-7706; the 
Milwaukee Ballet, (414)643-7677; and 
TIcketMastcr outlets and phone 
charge. 



.^^ 



THE U.S. PREMIERE TOUR OF 



MUSIC OFT 



m-JjLJAJLV&JEJLE* 



NIGHT 



"A FIRST-CLASS 
PRODUCTION! :' 

- Excellent cast and ' 
. -marvelous chorus! ' 
Colm Wilkinson's. ' • 
voice is rich!" 

•Vph Mtldun. flll.VtASHINUU.VI'OSt 



"THE MUSIC/ 
TRIUMPHS!,, 

. With its 
Large Orchestra, 
Snazzy Backdrops and 
Superbly Taunted '•'. 
young cast. 

Colm Wilkinson 
is Superb!" 

-U.tVmkl.llll-.UAMIiSCrONTIMIJi 



"EXPERTLY CRAFTED 
ENTERTAINMENT! 

The Performance Equivai ent 

OlAToiTHnOWN!" 
•TOum Unlet. IHt lUKitMO MUl ' 



" I WAS THRILLED, 

Touched and Mesmerized 
by Colm Wilkinson!" 



VfiMrt ISnfi.U III, nil. UtRONUi SUN 



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STARRING* «- ,• 



JANp'j&TZ 



xolm.\vii.ki*on ; * •,. •• "'MUSIC OF THE 

' ..', , ,; v ' NIGHT' SOARS! 

. • * » Entertaining and 

' '::'•.*.' Diumaticaiiy Staged!" 

p'Z • . LAURIE WILLIAMSON * j™ Sinn, ri«.i Kcinmii nisi . 






3 




NOW THRU DEC 21 ONLY! 

CHICAGO THEATRE 

175 N. STATE STREET . 







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; ' t'^'llll INSI-MIIIKASI 
1 OR TICKETS CAU.: 

(312) 902^1500 

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■ $tk AlmuiOur S|>aiull\ I'riial Matinee iVHurnunu'i «* 

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Dcc€Mb» 19, 1995 UkrlANcl NiwspA|>£RS AT HOME 



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An Area Guide to Home Design, Remodeling and Real Estate 



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Christmas in grand style 

The John F. Cuneo Mansion is 
decked out for the holidays 
both inside and out. The sec- 
ond annual holiday light show 
is underway on the grounds, 
offering a sparkling drive 
through a "Winter 
Wonderland." The holiday spir- * 
it shines within the mansion as 
well. 

. Coming up the drive, visitors 
will see a nativity scene com- 
plete with live goats. A 22-foot 
^ lighted nutcracker stands 
guard by the mansion. The 
windows are bedecked with 
wreaths and garlands adom 
the balcony railings. . 
In the foyer, greenery 
trimmed with pinecones and 
gold poinsettias gives a hint of 
things to come. Once in the 
i Great IJall; all eye&.to go, the 
20-foot artificial Christmas tree 
glittering with gold bows. 

"The Cuneos always had a real tree;" .said museum director; 
Barbara Hirschfeld. "The decorations are a combination of 
old ornaments that belonged to the family and some we 
bbugTit." 

Tucked under the tree is an assortment of toys which 
belonged to the many children raised in the house, said spe- 
cial event coordinator Virginia White. 

A wooden figurine around 7 feet tall stands by the tree; 
Hirschfeld explained the statue depicts St. Nicholas, a 19- ' 
century German saint It was discovered in the basement 
when the mansion was first opened to the public. 

Sprinkled throughout the house are poinsettias from the 
green thumb of Cuneo horticulturist Cindy Vasquez. 
Groupings of red, pink and white blossoms fill stairwells and 



. ,'vV,- ; 



See CUNEO page B14 



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Story by Suzie Reed 
Photos by Linda Chapman 






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Lakeland 

Newspapers 




LAKE LIFE UkilANd Newspapers Dec em ben 15, 1995 



At Home 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 




Tho double dining room Is draped In boau- y *-• -■-, 
tJful groenory and antique satin ribbons. 



From page B13 

corners. A pyramid of poinsettias in 
the ballroom forms a colorful holiday 
tree. In the Ship's Room, more poin- 
settias line the rich wood of the win- 
dow seats. 

Every fireplace mantel is draped 
with greenery, many sparkle with hol- 
iday lights and ribbons. More poin- 
settias line the hearths. 

"We buy so much ribbon every 
year/' said Hirschfeld. "Each year we 



try to buy some new ornament or 
new tree. 

One of the more unusual trees is 
one with a cjrcus theme in the library. 
Hirschfeld explained that Herda 
Cuneo has worked with the circus in 
Austria and made some of her own 
ornaments. The bedroom of Mrs. 
Cuneo Sr. features a Victorian tree, 
while Mr. Cuneo's room contains a 
blooming poinsettia tree. 
(Continued on next page) 



Treasured holiday linens and centerpieces decorate the tables. 



.. . . 



Y PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT =*= 

II FHA TITLE 1 1NSURED 
GOVERNMENT LOAN PROGRAM 



ou may be eligible for up to $25,000 for home improvements, 
regardless of your equity position. This government insured 
home improvement loan requires NO DOWN PAYMENT & 
SMALL MONTHLY PAYMENTS. 
THE FOLLOWING COVERED HOME 
IMPROVEMENTS INCLUDE: 
Kitchens, Basements, Bathrooms, Attics, Dormers, Siding, 
Windows, Roofs, Soffit, Fascia, Gutters, 
Rec. Rooms & Room Additions. 
Other Home Improvements May Also Qualify. 

IF INTERESTED, PLEASE CALL 

1-800-608-0602 

M-F 9:00 am-5:00 pm OR USE THE 24 HOUR VOICE MAIL 

These improvements will add value to your residence, improve 
your equity and upgrade you and your family's living conditions. 

CALL TODAY REGARDING THIS 

EXCEPTIONAL PROGRAM. THIS 

PROGRAM MAY BE LIMITED. 

. AaAPPUCATI0NSWILLBEPROCESSEO0NAf!RSTC0ME,RRSTSERVEDBASIS. s 

We Are A Title 1 Approved Contractor And Not 
Affiliated In Any Other Way. 



OTHER FINANCING & BILL CONSOLIDATION ALSO AVAILABLE! , 

Regardless of your credit history, we help you obtain financing 

approval. Good credit with low equity or marginal and bad credit 

with high equity. All financing approvals are subject to title' 

review & verification of credit application. 



We Are Now Booking Fall Furnace Cleanings - Call For Appt;! 

The question isn't 
whether or not you're 

going to buy a new gas 
furnace, it's whether or 
not you're going to get a 

free 10-year warranty in 
the process. 




. The fact that you're readirfg an ad about new gas furnaces indicates 
that your old one probably won't be around too, much longer. So why 
not replace it with a new Trane gas furnace before December 1, and get a 
free 10-year extended warranty on parts and labor in the process? Youll 
enjoy the quiet, dependability, and economy ^^^ 
of a Trane. And you won't have to worry ||^^~ TRAME ' 
about your old furnace breaking down in \^J F 
the middle of a cold spell this winter. ICs Hatd lb Stop A Trxme." 




Ill nuimi 



Aa an Energy Sfar Partner, Trane has determined that thii product meets the Energy 
■aniii Star guidelines for energy efficiency. 






Offer not available to eonlractort or builders or for commercial use. 
See your participating Trane dealer for qualifying modeU. 



MILLER'S AREA HEATING, INC. 

112 CENTER STREET • GRAYSLAKE, IL 60030 

223^0211 

■2.1 HOUR SERVICE • GAME LOCATION 104H1905 



A *S£f 






■i'--V 



* 






V4& s 



Dtctwbtn IE, 199S Ubbwd Newspap€rs AT HOME 



At Home 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 




The bait room has a pyra- 
mid of polreottlas that 
looks Ilk© a Christmas ho©. 



Most of tho rooms In Th© Curioo Mansion havo their own Christmas troos with dif- 
ferent holiday themes. 



(Continued from preceding page) 

A special treat in the Porcelain Room is a display of American Girls dolls on 
loan from a club. The exhibit, offered through Jan. 1, can only be seen as part 
of the house tour, said White. 

In the kitchen, an electric train chugs around a winter scene on top of the 
island amid the merry sounds of holiday music. A tree in the corner and green- 
ery atop the counter and stove add a festive touch. Red ribbons accent a gar- 
land at the window. 

A number of manger scenes are on display throughout the house, including 
one in the chapel. The eight trees lining the gallery 

"We try to stick with things that fit the house," said Hirschfeld. 

Tours of the Cuneo Museum begin daily at 11 a.m. Admission is $10 for 
adults, $9 for senior citizens, and $5 for children. There is no charge for kids 
younger than 3. For tour reservations call 362-3042. 




T 



We specialize in these popular holiday 
plants, iri a variety t>f sizes. The Christmas 

■ - : ■ -: 

favorite is our 6" pot with 5-plus blooms, 
pinched, foiled, airid sleeved. 

In addition to our large selection of Poinsettias, we have: 

•Christmas Cactus 
<mristmasArrangemeitts Si Centerpieces 
•Handmade Gifts and Holiday ! Decorations 



Fresh Ciit WisGonsiii Trees 

All Trees Cut After No vember|l 6 

Boughs 






•Wreaths •Ropingl^ 

A Price And Size For Every ^0ly 
Open 9a.rn.-9 p.m. 7 Days A Week 




Leiders 



GARDEN GREENERY INC. 



HOURS 

Mon.-Fri. 9 to 6 
Sat.-Sun. 9 to 5 



Phone:223-2422 

Located 2 miles north of Grayslake on the comer of Rte. 83 & Lake Street JuL 



First Time 




Featuring: 

• 5 balanced blades with a 52" blade span and 1 2° blade pitch 

• 3 various speeds in both forward and reverse 

• 25 year limited warranty motor 

All NFL™ Teams Available 

See dealer for full details 

WARREN ELECTRIC 

33261 N. Highway 45 • Wildwood, IL 
"Across From Lake County Fairgrounds" 

Hours —Materia] Counter— 

Mon-TutWed-Fri 9-6 MA A ****** #%#*#% Jk ** M I"! 

r n 708-223-8691 * 2 




designed by 



for football fans 
dedicated to lasting value 








•IK'J 



AT HOME UkclANd Newspapers DtceMbeit 15, 1995 



At Home 



Lakeland 

Newspapers . 




Next year you 
Christmas tree decorated 
with a collection of Mrs. 
Cunoo's shoes. 




Professional Service • Competitive Rates 



Personalized Programs Tailored to YOUR Needs 



•Life •Health •Disability Income 

•Long Term Care •Auto •Home •Marine 

Property Casualty & Employee Benefits 
Coverages for Business 



HOOVER 

STICK VAC 



WEST 

INSURANCE AGENCY INC. 



1733 Washington f 
Waukegan 



/ 




Family Owned 
Since 1929 



623-0456 

Phone Quotes 



iTj '• , a i ^* r r — *■ — n 




HOOVER 

ENCORE SUPREME 





Uses only 7.0 Amps. 

Deluxe hand grip. 24 ft. 

' quick release cord. 

Attached hose. 

Lightweight Includes 

on-board tools. With 

headlight, multi-height 

adjustment, and dual 

brushed edge cleaning. 
#19574 



HOOVER. 

STEAM VAC SUPREME 




Washes carpet fibers using hot tap water and cleaning 

solution. Ready to use instantly, no faucet hook-up. 

Fast and -effective cleaning. Deep cleans forward and 

reverse. Minimal dry time. Fingertip dispenser control. 

Convenient upright design. #100065/F5805 

WITH TOOLS (#100066 /fsbis) 1 79-99 



MS 



N 



n 



■finerBMaraffe-cou/rfrygif+s 
•■felicarf- 

Village Candles • Main St. Press • Cats Meow Village 

Brown Bag Cookie Art • Bradford Baskets 

Hartstone Pottery 'Kindred Spirits III 

Gooseberry Patch Holiday Books • Attic Babies 

Lang Graphics • Dried Herbs $ Flowers by t+ie Bunch 

• Come browse through bur holiday roomsl 

122 Center St., Orayslake, IL &0030 
70a-223-34G<a 



ii 



Sale Effective Thru December 19th, 1995 



&•*_ 



> '-- 



Holiday Hours:. M-F \OS *,Sat10-5 • Sun 11-^5 



ROUND LAKE 



LIBERTYVILLE 



Home I 
Center g 



Rt,134/ 



Rt.137 



ffi 



GURNEE 






Grand Ave.; 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 



MUNDELEIN 



S 



Rollins Rd. 



Hawley ? 



I 



A 



:<? 



LAKEHURST 



£ 



Rt.120 



DAILY 8:00-9pm 'SATURDAY 8:00-7pm SUNDAY 8:30-6pm 
(LAKEHURST OPENS AT 8:30 DAILY) 
We resenw the right to limit quantities and coirect printing errors. All rebates subject to manufacturers stipulations. 



STORE 
HOURS: 









DiccMbEft 1 *, 1 W UkrlANci NtwspApcRS AT HOME 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



— DECORATilNq DIMENSIONS— — — - §§3 — — 

Create a warm, cozy atmosphere with accessories 



Accessorizing for the holiday sea- 
son creates a warm, cozy atmosphere 
for family and friends, the kind of feel- 
ing lhat helps make the season so 
special. 

With a few hints, you can beautiful- 
ly decorate your home for the holi- 
days, and have a lot of fun doing Itl 
Creativity Is Important. And you don't 
have to spend your entire.- holiday 



budget on decorations. 

Many of the same principles of 
design used to decorate a house 
apply when accessorizing for the holi- 
day season. 

The holiday colors you choose can 
complement or accent any room, 
and do not necessarily need to Incor- 
porate the traditional red and green. 
For Instance, you can use white and 



Preparing the dining room for the holidays 



Some of the most; exciting and 
memorable events of the holidays are ; 
when family ahd friends gather at the:- 
dining table to share fabulous food 
?- and festive conversation. So be sure 
your dining room Is decorated to : flf 
the. occasion. 

For a heart-warming holiday dining 

room, your goal should be a delicious' 

^atmosphere for home-cooked meals. 

J Drape the tabje with special holiday 

j linen, for an enchanting comblna-. 

■ : tlon, drape the Stable with twb.cOordl- 

!, noting table cloths— a rich solid as a 

"base topped with a shorter coordinat- 

■ing pattern. The centerpiece should 

\be lively,- but not overbearing. 

^Consider filling a glass or silver bowl 

'with your favorite tree decorations, 

like colorful balls. Add pine cones. 



£ihc! , perhaps sprigs of cypress pine • 
arbuiid the bowl. 

This; Will provide i an attractive cen- 
terpiece without acting' as a barrier 
between Quests. Besides, you want to 
save room Tor ttwmouttv Watering del- 
icacies- you have prepared. Place 
unscented votive candles at each set- 
ting and tapers adjacent to': your cen- 
terpiece. 

■Tie napkins * wllh coordinating; rib- 
bons and place a sprig of fresh. holly 
on the folded napkins or under napkin j 
rings. And use a coordinating holiday 
fabric, to create a decorative sleeve 
for your chandelier chain. 

Preparing to welcome : family and 
guests Into your dining room can baa ;j 
lot of fun; and make even trie simplest 
liollday rrienu seem extraordinary! 



pink potnsettlas Instead of red, with 
other decorations In softer colors. 

Give a cheery holiday welcome to 
guests In your entry way or foyer. Snip 
sprigs of holly to fill planters by the 
front door, and add large bows made 
from patterned or solid fabrics. Carry 
these same colors throughout the 
house. A coordinating fabric table 
skirt Is the perfect touch, and Is easy 
to do. 

Candlelight gives any room. that 
magical soft holiday glow. 

Group candlesticks together and 
place them on the mantle or a table. 
Add special touches like sprigs of 
holly, pine or magnolia leaves at the 
base. 

If you have guests staying 



overnight, think of ways you can make 
them feel at home. Inspire the guest 
room with fresh flowers or potpourri. 
Holiday Inspired throw pillows on the 
bed add a cozy dimension. Are the 
window treatments designed for priva- 
cy? 

Consider some decorative shade 
options, such as balloon or Roman 
shades. These can be custom made in 
a coordinating pattern to give your 
room that finishing touch. 

Before your guests arrive, don't for- 
get to simmer potpourri, light the can- 
dles and play favorite holiday music. 
Go ahead— 'tis the season to deco- 
rate!— by MARY LEBEN, Decorating 
Den Gray slake, Gurnee. For decorat- 
ing questions, call Leben at 662-6612. 




tfje 

tillage 
Artisan 



Supplies & Classes 

Handcrafted Holiday 

Decorations & Gifts 

by r. Stanley 



172 E. Hawley, Grayslake (708) 223-4602 
Classes Now Forming • Hours: Tues.-Sat. 10-6 




! 



Become a feature home of the month 



fire tfoa (iving in your dream house? Do you haoc a eoeciat room to get auujy 
in? f/ota about that netn deck a(i the neighbors are envioue of? Or the epec/af 
room youjuot remodeled? 

if you enjoy reading ahout the feature home of the month in the fit Home 
Section of Lakeland tfetABoanere, and t^ouid tike to shorn Lake County your spe~ 
cJaf home caff Rooeffe Love at Lakeland ffeatepapere, 223-8 f6f for detaffe. 



GET THREE GREAT GIFTS 

FOR THE PRICE OF 1 



Windows & Walls Sale! 

L J" Jll /O on selected DU /© 



Save from: 
on selected 

•Custom Window Treatments 
•Wallcoverings & Borders 



from 

selected 

•Cellular Shades 
•Upholstery Fabrics 



Buy our 8 lb. Hotel Upright with our powerful 
Oreck Dual Speed Power Brush with attachments 
and you can get the Oreck XL Car Vac Bonus*. 

It's a great vacuum system that will handle every, 
cleaning task in your home, office or shop. 
JEor what you would pay for a vacuum cleaner \ 
you get a vacuum system! 



Call today Tor your complimentary consultation. These oilers end December 23, 1 995. 
•Discounts off instated retail 



i/GCOff cHjFkj Don 



3SH 




m 



HOLIDAY SPECIALS 

d C 





1"x6" 



59$ Lin. Ft. 1"x8" 86$ Lin. Ft. 



CLOSED SUNDAYS 

DECEMBER THRU 

FEBRUARY 



LIBERTYVILLE LUMBER 

Lumber Mlllwork and Building Products 

.412 N. First Street, Libertyville 



-0600 



m 



HOURS: 

Mon.-Fit 7-5 p.m. 

Sat. 8:30*1 p.m. 

CASH A CARRY 






Our Famous Oreck XL Hotel Upright features: 

•Weighs only 8 lbs. but has the power of a heavy industrial machine. 
•Hard-to-reach spots become easy-to-clean because the handle 
drops almost flatto the Hoor. 

•Exclusive Microsweep lets 
you move from carpet to bare^ 
floors without adjustment- 
No hoses or attachments 
to crack, break or 
replace, ever. 

Oreck XL Dual Speed Power Brush with Attachments 

•Powerful rotary brush whirls at 17,800 RPM. 'Weighs \ - 
only 4.2 lbs. but it's a real powerhouse. «3-way power dial 
adjusts for any surface or fabric. Use to remove lint from 
clothes or drapes. Spot or dry clean stains. 

'BONUS — Purchase the UPRIGHT and 

our POWER BRUSH and receive 

an Oreck Car Vac FREE 

(Pay only $6.00 $&H) 
Perfect for cars, trucks, 
vans, RV's and boats! 
i/Rated The Uost Powerful 
Car Vk of Ml 

Just plug this lightweight marvel 
into the cigarette lighter and 
harness its power to make 
your car immaculate. The 18-foot cord lets you reach 
' into (he back and gel at (he floor and seats. Includes a 
targe capacity dust cup, reusable filter, crevice toot « 
and dust brush. Ust Price $40.00 






S? 



fife 
l 
v4 



I 

¥ 

4 







g-.-H-l. 




"Area's ONLY Authorized Oreck Dealer") ; 

JACK'S VACUUM CENTER 

1814 Grand Ave. (1/2 Blk. East ol Lewis) 
WAUKEGAN (708) 336-8300 



I EXPIRE 
12-31-05 




I AT HOME UkElANd NcwspApERs Deccmder 19, 1995 



1 






rrrriT&J 



What to do if the power goes out 



Heavy snow. Ice, high winds and 
frigid temperatures are enemies of reli- 
able electric service. 

Before-arid after-winter storms rip 
through the area, knocking out power, 
there are a number of steps one should 
take to help people through any out- 
age. 

If the lights go out, check to see If 
power Is out in the neighborhood or If 
only one house Is affected. If it seems to 
be affecting only one house, a call to 
the local utility office should be made 
to report the problem. Otherwise, wait 
a few hours before calling to avoid 
overloading the switchboard. Chances 
are, the crews are already on their 
way. 

Do not try to operate a furnace 
which requires a blower while the 
power Is off. 

Unplug or turn off appliances such 
as toasters and televisions. Also, keep 
doors and windows shut and drapes 
and curtains drawn. 

If a fallen power line or burning 
transformer Is spotted, call the utility 
company. No one should ^attempt to 
move the power line and should be 
careful not step in nearby puddles. 
Extra care should be given so that chil- 
dren do not wander near fallen lines. 

Always keep a fresh supply of bat- 
teries on hand and place a flashlight In 



a convenient location. Transistor radios 
come In handy, too. Stay tuned to local 
stations to keep Informed about the 
outage and when the utility expects to 
have power restored. 

Food will stay fresh In a freezer for up 
to 24 hours but for less time In a refriger- 
ator. It's a good Idea to keep refrigera- 
tor and freezer doors closed as much as 
possible. If It appears that the outage 
may be lengthy, put dry Ice Into the 
refrigerator or remove the contents 
altogether and store them at the home 
of a friend or relative who does have 
electricity. 

While electricity Is usually restored 
within a few hours, damage caused by 
severe winter Ice storms may take 
longer to repair. This Is because heavy 
Ice may cause large sections of wire to 
fall, and crews must exercise extreme 
caution when working under these- 
dangerous conditions. 

Remembering and practicing these 
few suggestions will help everyone 
through a power outage. For other 
helpful hints, ComEd's 1995 Home 
Energy-Saving Products Guide offers 37 
pages of Ideas to make a home more 
energy efficient., plus, valuable 
coupons on suggested Items In the 
back of the booklet make purchases 
even easier. 

For free copies, call 1-80OEDISON-1. 



Become a feature home of the month 

£nj'oy reading about the feature, heme of the month in the fit Home Section 
of 'Lakeland lYett)r,paper&? (doutd you tike to nhoto Lake County your special home 
cad Ronelfe Love at Lake/and ffeta&paperr., 223-8 f6f for details. 



Still 
Searching 






For A 
■MUSI Cure For 

Dryness ? 



■ :■&>,". . . 



£<a32SSc 




Eliminate parched, harmful dry air in your home or condominium 
and start enjoying total indoor air comfort with an Aprilaire* Whole 
House Humidifier. 

The controlled moisture added by the safe, flow-thru Aprilaire sys- 
tem ends itchy skin, scratchy throats, static electricity and other irri- 
tations. At the same time, it protects your home and furnishings from 
the damages caused by dry air. 

Welcome the proven benefits of an Aprilaire Whole House Humidifier into your home. And remem- 
ber, there's an Aprilaire Whole House Humidifier for every type of heating sys- 



For installation or more information, contact us today. 



*»oi Icwiucru 
naMCmfefeiiMC 



• . -J* ■'.*.* • 

25 Years Experience 

Guaranteed Service -All Makes And Models .'* . 



Residential 



Heat Pumps 

Hot Water Heaters 

H u n i id i Tiers 

Air 
Conditioners 



HEAT & AIR 



(708)263-9991 



Commercial 



■.„*• I'u in aces \ 

• Meat Pumps 

> • Boilers 

•Waste Oil 
Burners 



24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE 



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$ 25 OFF 

Installation of Aprilaire (708)2^9991 



HEAT & AIR 



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You Can Afford 

OOPHISTIC 




Shop At Home 

1-800-499-4465 
Call today for your in-home 
consultation. Our expert 
designers can provide custom window 
treatments, upholstery and slip-overs, 
and bed coverings for every interior. 

KOUliiMTWP I-.J0-5! JO; TfcMM; 5*1 1H; 
S*» 1 1 -4 (Chicofo loniian Omlf) 



WINDOW 



WAR E HOUSE 



Tha Best Prices On Window Wear Anywhom.-Slnce 1946 

555 North Franklin St • CHICAGO • 312-321-1510 

Ohio and Franklin - Just off tha Kennedy 

Crossings Plaza • LAKE VELA • 708-265-6002 

10 minutes from Gurnoe Mills. Route 83 Just 1/3 mile north of 
Route 132 on the west side of 83 in Crossings Plaza. 

OPENING SOON IN 
RIVER FOREST & LAKE ZURICH 



"I Love Cbem-Dry* Soys Mrs. Karen Pieratoni of 
Highland Park - "I've bad my carpeting cleaned quite a 
few times over the past 20yrs. and it's never looked like 
brand new until Chem-Dry* cleaned it. I just can't 
believe that in my 20 years with children and pets, old 
carpet would ever look brand new again." . 




How? 

ith our Carbonated Cleaning 

SystemQ o 




o 




ill tbje T@s FoiQt 



q, .,.„ 

Tackles 

Tough Stains 

Red Stains 

Pet Stains 

& Odors 




igtpj-iftft 



CHEM-DRY® Of Lake County 




FOR FREE ESTIMATE CALL 

(708) 949-8552 



. HBBOMlTOMOl 

SSMKJlMICaXTt.KAlH 

imrcutooaaum 

maowa 

mnaui 

QTMlXB 







Dec tube* 15,1995 I aIceIawJ NcwspApeits AT HOME 



: 



i 




At Hom e 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Save money this winter 
with energy-saving ideas 



Writer storm 



Using energy wisely can reduce 
consumption and save money on 
utility bills, according, to the 
American Gas Association. Here are 
, some tips: 

1. Seal leaks around doors, wln- 
Idows and other openings, 
such as pjpes or ducts— with 
[caulking or weather-stripping. 

2. Set - thermostats 
)etween 65 and 70* degrees 

In the winter, at least five 
iegrees lower when sleep- 
ing, and at 58 degrees when 
iway from home for more 
than a few hours. (Warmer 
>mperatures are recommend 
[d for homes with III or elderly 
persons or Infants.) 

3. Set water heater tempera- 
ires at 140 degrees (at 120 

'degrees in homes with Infants or 
elderly persons to guard against 
accidental scalding), and Install 
water-flow restrlctors In showerheads 
and faucets. 

WA. Change filters or clean the fll- 
l|Brs in heating and cooling units 
twice a year. Close vents and doors 
In unused rooms. If pipes or ducts run 
through . unheqted areas, _ Insulate 
them. 

|.5. Use drapes, shutters, awnings, 
shade trees, glass with reflective film 
or solar screens to keep sunlight out 
«lri tho summer and tot It In during the 




winter. 

6. Check to see if attic and base- 
ment (or crawl space) have the rec- 
ommended level of Insulation. 

7. If you have a woodburntng fire- 
place, consider Installing a natur- 
al gas fireplace Insert, which 
can save on energy costs 
compared with wood. A gas 
fireplace also will dramatical- 
ly reduce the air pollution 
created from burning wood. 

8, Consider storm or 
thermal windows and doors 

or-double paned glass. A less- 
expensive alternative Is plastic 
sheeting, which can be tem- 
porarily fastened over doors 
and windows to retain heat 
or air conditioning. 

9. Be sure that dish- 
washers, washing machines 

and clothes dryers are fully loaded 
before running. 

10. When buying new appliances, 
compare energy efficiency ratings 
and annual operating costs. A slight- 
ly higher Initial cost for a high-effi- 
ciency appliance could pay Itself 
back In a very short time through 
energy savings and lower utility bills. 

Many. natural gas utilities offer 
assistance and special programs 
designed to help consumers reduce 
their energy bills. Contact your local 
gas utility for more Information. 



TORO 



NOTHING THROWS SNOW LIKE THIS! 

AMERICA'S MOST 
POPULAR TWO-STAGE 

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NO INTEREST ^ *\ ^^ \ { ■ - i J^ M* * Tr0 Ye * ^ w * Trtf 

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INTRODUCING THE 

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•For fi£M buywi on T«tf» RewMng Chtipi Ptat Prie« otyd to toed dubf opnon.*S*«dMl«rlof4«t*iiont4sin>M*uTnty. 



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•Professional Assembly Which Includes f\ £ ¥\ F? ' *i 

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•Factory Trained Mechanics 11 

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Illinois Home Builders, Inc. 



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WINDOWS & SIDING SPECIALISTS 



Licensed W Bonded W Insured 



STOP BY AND SEE OUR STATE OF THE ART SHOWROOM 



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and pay for them Next Year! 



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Double Hung with Screen 








Show Room Hours: 

Monday & Thursday 

7 am -9 pm 
Tuesday Wednesday, 

Friday 7 am - 5 pm 

Saturday 9 am- 1 pm 

Closed Sundays 



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WINDOWS • SCREENS • WINDOW CAPPING 

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CALL TODAY 

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or 

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Why Pay Home Improvement Prices? 

23600 Milwaukee Avenue • Vernon Hills • Just N. of Rte. 22 





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:."'.'.: '■r.'.-:^rt.:.4:,~ J :,^-'*-"f- f ~^' • — *j>c-.~— — -- 




{ AT HOME LaI<eIancI Ncws[>aj)eih Dec im ben 15, 1997 



At Home 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Real Christmas trees provide unique beauty, tradition 



The making of a Christmas free 

When you walk down the aisles of 
your favorite Christmas treo lot or 
choose and cut farm, do you ever 
stop to wonder, how all of those trees 
got there? 

Once upon a time, all Christmas 
trees were cut from natural stands (or 
straight out of the forest). As you can 
Imagine, these wild trees looked noth- 
ing like today's professionally grown 
and sheared trees. Today, of the 33 
million trees sold every year, over 90 
percent are shipped or sold directly 
from U.S. Christmas tree farms. 

Typically, the growing process 
begins in a nursery where superior 
seeds are planted and grown to two- 
year-old seedlings. Then Ihe seedlings 
are transplanted to Christmas tree 
farms. 

But that's Just the beginning. 
Growing Christmas frees Is a year- 
round job that takes a great deal of 
patience, diligence and know-how. IT 
takes an average of seven years for a 
tree to reach sale height. During that 
time, the tree must continue to be 
shaped and pruned to produce the 
lush, fully shaped trees that consumers 
demand. 

The Christmas tree also may face 
many hazards during Its growth peri- 
od: too much or too llttfe sun or rain; 
destruction by Insects, disease, hall or 
fire; overgrowth of brush, vines and 
weeds; or even theft. 

Only the best trees are selected for 
harvest. If chose, a tree Is tagged, cut, 
bundled, and loaded onto a truck or 
railroad car for the journey to a retail 



lot, and finally to your home, whore It 
will continue to represent the spirit of 
life throughout the holiday season. 

Real frees for real people 

Celebrating Christmas with a real 
tree has been a tradition for over 400 
years. New trends In buying and dis- 
playing real trees can add conve 
.nlence and fun to your family cele- 
bration. 

Choose and cut farms recre 
ate the experience and 
atmosphere of days gone by 
when Christmas trees were 
harvested from the forest. 
For many families, a trip to a 
choose, and cut farm or 
retail lot Is a part of the 
holiday celebrations. 

Multiple and 

"theme* trees are popu- 
lar with families. Often, 
a main tree is dis- 
played In the living 
room and other 
"theme" trees are 
on display through- 
out the house. 
Possible themes 
might Include 
angels or a hobby 
tree. Some families 
purchase smaller 
trees for their children to 
decorate. 

A fable top real Christmas tree pro- 
vides an alternative for apartment 
dwellers and others with limited 
space. Long popular In Europe, this 
smaller version of our holiday symbol 




makes It easy for anyone to enjoy a 
fresh, fragrant, real tree. 

In some areas of the country, living 

trees are gaining In popularity. Living 

trees have their roots In tact and can 

be re-planted outside following the 

holiday. (Living trees have a better 

survival rate In mild climates.) 

Simple steps guarantee fresh- 
ness 

"Choosing a real Christmas 
tree can be fun for the whole 
family," says Bob Scott, pres- 
ident of the National 
Christmas . Tree 

Association, He suggests a 
few simple steps to follow 
when selecting a .tree: 
Do a freshness test. 
Gently grasp a branch 
between your Ihumb 
and forefinger and 
pull It toward you. 
Very few . needles 
should come off In 
your- hand If the 
tree-Is fresh. 

Take a look at 
the . ground 
around the tree. 
You should not see an 
excessive amount 
of green needles 
on the ground. Some 
loss of Interior brown needles Is normal 
and will occur over the lifetime of the 
tree. 

• Once you've chosen your tree, 
keep It In a sheltered, unheated area 
such as a porch or garage to protect 



It from the wind and sun until you are 
ready to decorate It. 

•_ Before you set up your tree, 
make, a fresh, straight cut across the 
base of the trunk (about a half-Inch 
up from the original cut) and place 
the tree In a tree stand that holds two 
or more quarts of water. , 

"Caring for your real tree is easy. 
The most Important thing to remem- 
ber Is that real trees need water 
dally, 1 says Scott. "Never let your tree 
stand go dry." ' 

A seal of dried sap will form over 
the cut stump In four to six hours If the 
water drops* below the base of the 
tree, preventing the tree from absorb- 
ing water later when the tree stand is 
refilled. If a seal does form, another 
fresh cut will need to be made. 

A tree will absorb as much as a 
gallon of water In the first 24 hours and 
once or more quarts a day thereafter. 
Water Is Important because It pre- 
vents the needles from drying and the 
boughs from drooping. 

• In addition, keep your tree away 
from heat and draft sources like fire- 
places, radiators and television sets. 
Test your light cords and connections 
before hanging them on the tree to 
make sure they're In good working 
order. You don't want to use cords 
with cracked Insulation or broken or 
empty sockets. Also be sure to unplug 
the lights before you go to bed or 
leave the house. \ 

Sensible precautions such as these 
will, help preserve the unique beauty 
and, tradition that only a real 
Christmas tree can provide. 




A gaslog fire adds warmth 

and delight to any fireplace. 

Our Ings arc cast from real trees 

chosen for their bark texture 

and real log character. 

They are available in Oak, 

Pine and Birch styling 

to compliment any size 

and type of fireplace. 



Sf:i; StOith I it Detail*. 




FIREPLACE TOOLSETS 

and ail our hearth furnishings 



Our entire stock 
of fine fireplace 
accessories is 
on sale now. 
With additional 
discounts on display 
items and one-of-a-kind 
merchandise. 



SALE ENDS 

December 24th 



We 

Have Great 

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DtcEMbER \5, 1995 UkelANd Newspapers 1AKELIFE I 





Events 



Poet Philip Dacey to read works 

Philip Dacey, an award-winning poct^will read his poetry during a 
free program on Friday, Dec. 15 al ihc University of Wlsconsin-Parksldc. 
The poetry reading will be held at 2:30 p.m. In the UW-Parksido Library 
Overlook Lounge, located on the second floor of the library. For more 
information call (414)505-2139. 

Benefit at Durty Nellies 

A benefit for the family of Chris Norton, a teacher at Winston 
Campus in Palatine, will be held al Durty Nellies, 55 N. Bothwcll, 
Palatine, on Dec. 17 from 7 p.m. to midnight An evening of acoustic . 
music is planned, with musicians from Mr. Blotto, Underwater People, 
Brunt Toast, Birds at the End of the Road, Matt McBrldc, Dustin Parker 
and Cathy Richardson. Norton passed away unexpectedly last spring 
leaving a wife and three young children. Money will be raised through 
contributions at the door. 

Pets in Need holds Shop & Share 

Pets in Need will hold a Shop & Share. fund-raising program on Dec 
18, 19 and 20 at all Jewel Food stores. By shopping at Jewel 'on one of 
those days, 5 percent of the total purchases will be donated by lewel to 
the organization. Anyone interested In helping Pets in Need will need a 
Shop & Share Identification Slip and should contact Jo CI ark at 
(815)653-4871 or Pat at (815)728-1462 to obtain a slip before shopping. 

White sale at Volo antiques, auto museum 

The Volo Antique Auto Museum Is celebrating the holidays with a 
white sale featuring non-advertised, early shopper, bright light specials. 
Choose from vintage cars, furniture, clocks, toys, comic books and fishing 
lures, to name just a few of the items patrons can find al Volo Village. Call 
the mall at (B15)344-6062for more information. 

Hatiukkah celebration for adults 

Enjoy the holiday with the 50+ Club and "J" friends on Wednesday, 
Dec, 20 at ip.m. at Northwest Suburban JCC, 1250 Badclifre Rd., 
Buffalo Grove. Enjoy the traditional Hanukkah foods and a performance 
by Lana & Phyllis with the JCC Kindergarten Choir. Members pay $3 
and guests arc 54. Call 392-7411 for further details. 

Trim a tree for wildlife at Volo Bog 

Take a break from holiday preparations to prepare a treat for back- 
yard friends on Sunday, Dec 17, from 12:30 to 2 p.m. at the Volo Bog. 
Bring along a big sewing needle and some waxlcss dental floss to this 
program, which Is great for young kids and their parents. Ages 3 to adult 
arc welcome. Reservations are required. Call (815)344-1294. 



-CmTic's ChoicE — — ■— 

Simon's 'London Suite' shows potential 




A scon© from "London Suite" features John Cooke, deanna Dunagan and Mark Morettlnl. 






Children— 

*Frorn page B9 . 

"unique for the first year," said 

•*DUlon. "They shouldn't be afraid 
to spile down their celebrations 
and to celebrate in a way which 
makes them most comfortable. 
Some find comfort in religious 
remembrances others prefer to 
Iqok at photos and recall family 
celebrations of the past It* is 
important they follow their own 
instinct on what is right for them 
and not feel pressured to do 
more." 

For all families, the most 
important advice is not to lose 



sight of the meaning of the sea- 
son and to participate in healthy, 

nurturing activities that will pro- 
duce a sense of fulfillment. 

"The worst thing any one can 
do is use alcohol or drugs to 
'comfort' them," Dillon said. 
"Alcohol is a depressant and will 
ultimately not comfort the indi- 
vidual." 

Dillon operates the Center 
for Wellness Counseling and 
Education. She docs both family 
and individual counseling as 
well as grief and addiction coun- 
seling. 



Veteran playwright Neil 
Simon has made audiences laugh 
and weep — sometimes in the 
same breath— with his 28 come- 
dies, from "Barefoot in the Park" 
and "The Odd Couple" to "The 
Goodbye Girl" and "Lost in 
Yonkcrs." 

In ' his latest endeavor, 
"London Suite," now playing for 
an open run at Chicago's Briar 

Street Theatre, Simon sticks to-_ 
the tried and true*: 

In its rewritten form, the 
comedy consists of three sepa- 
rate acts (trimmed from four) 
each using the same, handsome 
set; An old, fashionable hotel 
room in London. The play is 
somewhat reminiscent in style to 
Simon's "Plaza Suite" and 
"California Suite." 

"Going Home," which prob- 
ably tugs most at the heartstrings, 



COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY SPRING CLASSES 



Building 

CAREER OPTIONS 




When Julius Curry decided to build his career as a * 
counselor, he turned to the College of Lake County to 
begin his* educational training. 

"1 became interested In human services work through 
my Involvement with the Salvation Army, where I still 
volunteer for six to eight hours each week. Now I 
work as a substance abuse counselor for the Lake 
County. Health Department, and am a part-time student 
at CIC, working on my A.A.S. degree In human 
services. I think education Is an absolute must In our 
day and age and I'm planning to go all the way and 
get my Ph.D In the human services field," Curry said. 



If you're seeking to start a new career, 
update your skills or gain new ones, the • 
College of Lake County can provide the 
training you need at a cost you can afford. 



features a widowed mother 
recounting details to her daugh- 
ter of a date from hell. Barbara 
Robertson puts a snappy spin on 
her role as the lovably forgetful 
parent to Amy Farrington. 

In "Diana and Sidney," the 
humor is less than boisterous as 
Deanna Dunagan plays a televi- 
sion celebrity meeting for the first 
time in eight years with her for- 
mer mate. John Cooke portrays 
the ailing ex -hush and who" Is now 
pursuing a relationship with a 
male partner. . 

Robertson, Dunagan and 



Cooke return in "The Man on the 
Floor," a farcical skit with much 
potential*. But despite a frenzied 
pace complete with bodies falling 
all over the place, the whole situ- 
ation is forced and does not live 
up to its potential. 

If it's to become a truly 
smashing hit, "London Suite" 
may need a little more time to 
gel as its characters learn to relax 

and allow spontaneity a freer 

"reign. 

.Ticket information is avail- 
able at (312)343-4000.— by TOM 
WITOM 




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Registration for spring classes Is underway. Classes start January 22, 1996. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (7 08) C • O « L • L • E • G • E' 



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• Special Family Pass Rates • Onlv 1 hour North of Chicle 

• Complete Ski Shop • 23 Wide runs - 14 Lilts 

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Weekdays 9;30 ilni-10 p.n?, • Weekends, Hoiidm 9 a.m.- 1 /j,m. 

+ 414.862.2301 + 




LAKEUFE UkElAwl Newspapers. DtceMbe* 15, 1995 



Deck the malls with barbs and hollys r Good Food 



The Christmas season, more 
than any other time of year, con- 
firms what women have sus- 
pected all along— shopping is in 
our genes (and 
our shoes, our 
purses and that 
•darling matching 
hat). Oh, some- 
times We try to 
deny it, claiming 
we hate shopping 
and attempting 
to hand off the 
chore to our hus- 
bands, but how 
can they remember to shop for 
gifts when they dort't even know 
what day it is? Face it — most men 
do not remember dates, unless 
they involve climactic sporting 
events, such as the date the 
swimsuit issue of Sports 
Illustrated comes out. 

And history backs this up. An- 
thropologists have discovered evi- 
dence that crude forms of female 
shopping existed as far back as the 
prehistoric age. They believe it 
started when women became 
bored with their husband's choic- 
es of food to hunt Graffiti was dis- 
covered on cave walls that, when 
* translated, means Triccratops for 
dinner? AGAIN?" 

Eventually women began to 
insist on accompanying their 
mates on hunting excursions, 
where they took over the task of 
picking out the appropriate ani- 
mal for dinner: "Let me sec 
now— a saber- tooth? — no, we 
had that last week — oh, look— a 
pterodactyl with a broken wing! 
Perfect, You won't even get wind- 
ed chasing that one! Maybe you'll 
feel like dragging me around the 
cave by my hair tonight 1 . Ylow 
long has It been, anyway?" 

So, like it or not, we females of 
the species must accept that we 
have been chosen, by virturc of 
our inborn gift from nature, to do 
what males arc simply not cut out 
to do: Christmas shopping. 1 
don't know about you, but 1 do 
not know of one husband who 
docs the majority of the Christ- 
mas shopping for his family and 
relatives. Actually, 1 can't picture 
what Christmas would be like if 



they did. It would probably 
change the face of the retail world 
as we know it, since only two 
types of stores would remain in 



LIFE'S 

A 
BEAR 

DONNA ABEAR 




by my soon-to-be former wife." 

4. THE KMART SHOPPER. 
Spends more time than usual at 
the doctor's office complaining of 
strange symp- 
toms: "I keep 
seeing this blue 
light flashing. 
And sometimes, 
I even think I'm 
Jaclyn Smith." 

5. THE SOCIAL 
SHOPPER. Many 
women fall into 
this category, 
since shopping 



business — hardware stores and 
appliance stores. (OK— maybe 
Victoria's Secret). 

Of course, although women 
arc born to shop, there are subtle 
differences in our styles (and our 
credit ratings): 

1. THE "I'M ORGANIZED, 
YOU'RE NOT— NA, NA, NA, NA, 
NA, NAH!" SHOPPER. This is the 
woman who picks up gifts alt 
through the year, many, of them 
during the January sales. She takes 
them home, wraps them immedi- 
ately, and stores them away. By 
October, she can be heard to brag, 
"I have all my Christmas shopping 
done already." Of course, these 
same women were also potty- 
trained by the age of one year, 
which apparendy has done some 
permanent damage. 

2. THE "NO TIME TO SHOP" 
SHOPPER. The majority of women 
with small children fall into this 
category. Throughout December, 
they can be observed in the malls, 
wearing running shoes and carry- 
ing 12 packages under one arm, 
with a screaming toddler under 
the other. They can spot a rare 
Power Ranger from 100 yards 
away, and are able to leap over 
other shoppers in a single bound 
to get to 50 percent off sale racks. 

3. THE "SHOPPING IS MY 
LIFE" SHOPPER. Carries her 
credit cards in a briefcase. Has 
the Home Shopping Network 
number programmed on her 
phone. Owns the "Popeil Pocket 
Fisherman," but hates fishing. 
Husband takes out ads about her 
in the newpapen "Am not re- 
sponsible for any debts incurred 



. can serve as a bonding event, 
similar to when women visit 
rcstrooms in groups. Moving in 
herds of two to four, they shop 
while providing emotional rein- 
forcement to each other "Oh, 
Debbie— that is so YOU! You've 
got to get it. WIto cares what it 
costs! You deserve itl" 

There is, however, one type of 
Christmas shopping that is better 
left to men: Choosing a cut-your- 
own Christmas tree. We found that 
out this year. You won't believe 
tills, ladies, but once you cut them, 
you can't return them. And, would- 
n't you know it, just after we paid 
for the first one, I found the PER- 
FECT tree. Now, we have two — 
one "okay" tree and one PERFECT. 
Next year, he wants to go 
alone. Fine— but it probably 
won't be PERFECT. 



Carry on tradition creating 
potato latkes supreme 

Chanukah, the Festival of Lights, will begin at sundown Dec. 
1 7, and last eight nights. 

This holiday Is celebrated to remember a miracle that took 
place more than 21 centuries ago, when a group of Jews, In hid- 
ing from the Syrian -Greek ruler Antiochus who took control of 
their land, huddled together in a shelter, with only enough oil to 
burn for one night. 

A brave soldier went out to get more oil, but did not return 
for eight days. Miraculously, the oil lasted until he came back. 

To celebrate this miracle, it is customary to cat food fried in oil 
to recall the great legend. Most popular among Chanukah (other 
acceptable spellings are Hanukkah and Chanuka) is the latkc, also 
known as the potato pancake. Latkes can be made from any type 
of raw potato, depending on taste, texture or appearance needs. 

The following is a recipe for Potato Latkes Supreme, as sub- 
mitted by Mrs. Gussic Wclnraub, Bronx, New York, in "The 
Examiner Prize Kosher Cook Book," copyright 1949. 

Potato Latkes Supreme 

. 2 white potatoes 
1 medium sized sweet potato 

1 medium steed onion 

2 eggs 

1 top. salt 

1 scant cup of Dour 

1/8 tsp. pepper 

Grate white and sweet potatoes, add grated onion, eggs slight- 
ly beaten, salt, flour and pepper. Mix thoroughly. Drop batter by 
spoonfuls into the hot oil and fry medium heat until crisp and 
golden brown on both sides. Drain on paper towels, and serve ' 
with applesauce, sugar, or sour cream, —by SPENCER SOIFJN 



Musicians' center highights students 



Kami's Musican's Center 
School of Music of Grayslakc offers 
a highly structured curriculum 
with national level standardized 
requirements and service to stu- 
dents all over Lake County. Onwer 
and Director Kathleen W. Cizcwski, 
NCTM, is an accomplished concert 
pianist organist and college 
instructor holding national certifi- 
cation and a national faculty posi- 
tion with Texas-based American 
College of Musicians and National 
Guild of Piano Teachers. Cizcwski 
has produced and marketed seven 
professionally recorded cassettes 
available through KMC. 

KMC celebrates the end of the 
fall term with required attendance 
at music workshops and perfor- 
mances for youth through adult, 
beginner through advanced level 
students. The Dec. 6 "Spotlight 
Performance" featured some of the 
students as well as faculty perfor- 
mances. KMC has a fully degreed 
and nationally approved perfor- 
mance faculty, including Vincc 
Ccntcno, Felix Cizewski, Ami Kas- 
tor, Matthew Kastor and Rebecca 
Tallian/KMC assistant director. 

Kathi's Musicians' Center is 
beginning the 1 winter term on Jan. 
15. The school offers piano, organ, 
keyboards, woodwinds, ear train- 
ing, theory, music history and 
chord -approach arranging skills in 



private lessons and classes year 
round. For more information call 
223-5726, 




Lakeland 

Newspaper** 



Forefronts 



You can also fax us at 223-8810 or 
E-Mail response to: edit@lnd.com 



Lakeland Newspapers' in-depth progress edition, Forefronts,* will be published Feb. 9, 1996. We are 
seeking reader input for use in this special section; Please return your comments by Dec. 1 7 to: 

Forefronts Survey , 
Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S.Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

1. Who is the most influential person in Lake County? 

2. What is the top recreational spot in Lake County? 

3. Name your favorite Lake County restaurant. 

4. What is the best night spot in Lake County? \_ 

5. Name the worst road in Lake County. 

6. What is your biggest concern about the future of Lake County? _ 



7. What is the best reason for living in Lake County? 



Town in which you live. 



Decuibu 1 ?, 1 999 UIceIancJ Newspapers LAKEUFE 




-MoviE Pick 

Travolta ends winning streak with 'Burden' 



Be TIhere 






Fnicp 



j-. - • -y. .-.■.-.■. .■y-jr.y.y/, j 



?A<:?. 



John Travolta, who had a two- 
game winning streak going with 
"Pulp Fiction" and "Get Shorty," 
runs out of steam in his latest 
movie, "White Man's Burden." 

"Burden" is obviously sup- 
posed to be making a social state- 
ment about racial discrimination, 
which it docs for just a little while, 
but all too soon it turns Into the 
sort of mediocre action film that 
Travolta was making before his 
comeback to superstardom. 

The premise of "Burden," 
showing a world dominated by 
blacks, depicts the other side of 
the coin of racial discrimination. 
We see whites malingering job- 
less on street comers and black . 
cops hassling white people, but 
this effort at using a plot that has 
■ worked as a comedy or a satire, to 
make a serious statement, falls 
| miserably. 

The plot has a jobless Travolta 
[who gets fired when he unwitting- 
ly gets too good a look at his boss' 
ife, trying to get his job back 
rom his rich black employer, 
ilaycd by Harry Belafonte. 

Belafonte, annoyed that this 

'peasant" would dare to bother 

im at home, ignores his pleas. 

i ere, as in many other parts of 

lis flick, the discrimination is 

more economic and not racial. 

[Travolta ends up kidnapping him 

fand this is where the film really 

[ goes bad. 

As a commentary on black 
versus white, "Burden" is about 
30 years too late to make any 
social impact since neither the 

unhappy whlto man or the 

pompous black man present any- 
thing new that we haven't seen 
several times since Sidney Poitier 
was handcuffed to Tony Curtis 
during a jail break, or since he 
dined with Spencer Tracy and 
Katharine Hepburn. 

Guess whatl After spending 
many hours together; Travolta 
and Belafonte come to realize 
that despite the color and eco- 
nomic differences, they arc both 



General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



(ROUTE 43 n«ar ROUTE 120 
473-4200 



HEAT (R) 

Plays On Two Screens 

1:00, 1:30,4:45, 5:15, 8:30, 9:00 



JUMANJI (PG) 

1:00,3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10*0 



ISABPJNA (PG) 

1:45,4:30,7:15,9:50 



TOY STORY (G J 

1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, &00 



GOLDENEYE (PG13) 

1:45, 4:30,7115, 9:50 



IT TAKES TWO (PG) 

1*0,3:10,520 



WHITE MAN'S BURDEN 

N 

7:30,9:40 



ACE VENTURA 2 (PG1 3) 

1*0,3:15,5:30,7:45,10*0 



THE AMERICAN 
PRESIDENT (PG13) 

12*0,4:30,7:15,9:45 



FATHER OF THE BRIDE 
PART II (PG) 

1:00, 3:15, 530, 7:45, 10:00 



MONEY TRAIN (R) 

1*0,3:15,5:30,7:45,10*0 



CASINO (R) 

1*0,4:45,8:30 



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Solo activities 

Solo Singles will hold their Super Dance on Dec 15 at the Muhdclcin Holiday 
Inn, Rtcs. 45 and 83, from 8:30 p.m. to 1 a. m. Admission Is $8. Their Relationship 
Scries continues on Dec, 17 at 6:30 p.m. at Lou's. Cost 1$ $1 or $2 for beverages 
and snacks. For directions call Lou at 634-2925 or Herb at 395-7117. For more 
information on Solo activities, call the hotline at 233-7982. 



^ r — ■• '-- 



MoNdAy 



?$&% 



mm 



iij 



Knitter's guild meeting set 

The Lake County Knitter's Guild will hold Its monthly meeting on Dec. 18 at 
7:30 p.m. at the Llbertyville Twp. Hall on Ellis Street. New members are wel- 
come. Call Linda Lutz at 913-7795 for further information. 










:-v 



TuesdAy 



John Travolta and Harry Bolafonto 



simply men. Shades of Nick Nolte 
and Eddy Murphy in "48 Hours." 

"Burden" is full of cliches and 
one gets the feeling of "been 
there, done that" throughout 
most of the picture. 

Travolta uses an accent that 
doesn't fit and Belafonte is as 
classy as usual, which is one of 
the problems. He's supposed to 
be the bad guy and a movie 
where the bad guy is more likable 
than the good guy, who is really 
out of place, just doesn't work. 

Travolta is at his best when he 
Is audacious. When he played 



another "stupid" role, Vbiny in 
TV's "Welcome Back Kottcr," he 
was just as dumb but he had ' 
some moxy, John, please get rid 
of that rusty hair! 

• The premise that switches the 
black and white roles has a lot of 
untapped potential which we 
would like to see expanded. 
Because "Burden" missed its 
mark entirely, we are going .to 
give it two out of five stars. If you 
are a real Travolta fan, wait for 
the video version, otherwise 
-don't bother.— by GLORIA 
DAVIS 



Moms clubs meet 

Gurncc Moms Club and the Moms Club of Grayslakc are both support groups 
for mothers who choose to stay at home with their children. They offer play- 
groups, outings and support to all moms. Both clubs meet the third Tuesday of 
each month. For location and limes of the Gumec club call 263-0694 or 623-3855. 
For more Information on the Grayslakc club call Judy Klostcrman at 855-9432. 

Women's group offers support 

Meet other women in a confidential, supportive discussion group. The group 
meets twice monthly on Tuesday evenings in Libcrtyvillc. Call Lisa at 680-4106. 

Postpartum depression support group meets 

Famfly Network, 330 Laurel Ave., Highland Park, sponsors a free Depression 
After Delivery postpartum depression support group from 7:30 to 9 p.m. every 
Wednesday. Optional support group for husbands Is also available. Call Susan 
Felngold, Spy.D. for information and registration at 831-7731. - 



a 



■Cdiytifyq .iSoi* 



Belvidere Mail 

Theatres 662-741 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 



D 
D 
D 
W\ 

c 

D 

B 

E 
D 

C 



H.50 all seats all shows 

UUIMMCS TATI M 

DEAD PRESIDENTS (R) 

Frl. & Mon.-Thura. 8:45.0:30 
Sat. &8un. -|;16~*:00-0:*&-o.30 

MORTAL KOMBAT (PG13) • 
- Fri. & Mon.-Thur. 6:15-7:15-9:35 
Sat & Sun. 1 :00 -3:00-5: 15-7:15-0:35 

PATRICK aWATZS IN 3 WISHES (PG) 

Fri. a Mo n. -Thur. 5 : 1 5-7 : 1 S 
Sal. &. Sun. 1:00-3:00-5:10-7:15 



Ample Parking 

AMTOMO SAMOA Ml IM 

NEVER TALK 
TO STRANGERS (R) 

Diily Q;40 



DANGEROUS 
MINDS (R) 



Sa 



Fri. A Mon.-Thur. 6.20-7:30-0:40 
t & Sun. 1:05-3: tO-5:20-7,30.D:40 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



La Leche League meeting slated 

La Leche League of Cnain-O-Lakes will hold their meeting on Dec 20 at 9*30 
a-m. For information and location of the meeting call Mary Ann at 265*9054. 



GURNEE CINEMA 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL • 708-855-9940 



SR. CFT. SPECIAL 82.50 WEDS & FRI AFTERNOON. BARGAIN MATINEES - ADULTS S4.50 BEFORE 53d. 

CHILDREN UNDER S NOT ADMITTED TO "R" RATED FEATURES 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15 THROUGH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21 



SAflHINA (NO PASS} 



JUMAHJI (NO PASS! 



HEAT (OHTWOSCTEEWJ 



FATHER OF THE BRIDE II 

(OH TWO SCflEEHS) 



TOY STORY (tXGTTAI.) [HO PASS) 



CASINO 



GOLDENEYE 



THE AMERICAN PRESIDENT 



PG T F-SU4TH 1:10-4:05^.50-9:30; M-W 4:05-6:50-9:30 



PG F-SU*TH 12:00-2:20-4:40-7:00-9:15; M-W 4:40-7:00-9:15 



PO 



PO-11 



PO-11 



F-SUiTH 1:30.3:15-5:00-7:25^:30; M-W 5:00-7:25-8:30 



F-SU4TH 1 1:45-12;45-2^(XJ«M:1 5*1W:30-7:3Oe:4*W5 
M-W 4:15-5:15-6 $0-7 30-8:*S-9:45 



F-SUITH 11:<5-lflS43frS30-T;lM:10s M-WSaO-7:1ftfr.1Q 



F-SUATH 1:004:45^:15; M-W 4:45-8:15 



F-SUITH 1KKM:0O<:45-9 J5; M-W 4 :0tH»:4M35 



IdOHEYTBWH- 



MCKOFT1UE 



ACS VENTURA: NATURE CALLS 



rr TAKES TWO 



GET SHORTY 



BBUyHBHyByUQUUHBDHUyBQDDyHHHBHDBDHBB 



MMjtH A2.-O0-aa5-4 ^0-730-9^43; U-W 4J0-7 J0^-.45 



F-SUKTHH:4«:0fr5:15-T3S-9:55; M-W 5:1S-T3S-B:SS 



F-SUATH 1:403 J5-530-7:<5>10 JO; M-W 5:30-7:45-10:00 



PG-13 | F-5U«TH1MS-3:?0.S^5.7JMJ5,-||-W5^S-7J0->J5 



PO j F-SLIATH12:15-?:35-4.53;U-W4:55 



MH 7:15*30 



I MUNDELEIN CINEMA j] 

Presents || 




Mondays- All Seats $1.00 
All Seats $2.00 



TO DIE FOR 



M-Fri. 6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.; 
Sat & Sun. 2:00, 4:00, 6:00 & 8:00 p.m. 

^ ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW— 

Every Sat. Afi/e / 1:30 p.m. 
Admissions $5.00/$3.00 In R.H. costume or w/mititary I.D. 

FOR INFORMATION, CALL 566-5444 

c 



155 N. SEYMOUR, MUNDELEIN 



FOX LAKE THEATRE m 

115 Lakeland Plaza • Fox Lake gen 



PLAYING Dec. 15-21 



(708) 973-2800 {"£,1 S 

GEN ADMISSION S5 S fM ' 



SABRINA (pg) 

FTiJMonJTuon. 6:50 • 0:35 

Sat/Sun^WedyThur, 

1:20 • 4.-00 • 6:50 9:35 



JAMANJI (pe) 

FrUMoruTues. 7:10 • 9:40 

SaUSun-ZWett/Triur. 

1:30 • 4:05 • 7:10 • 9:40 



TOY STORY (o) 

Fri JMonJTlHtt. 7KXJ • 8:50 

SaL/SunjWedyThur. 

1:00 • 2:55 • 4:50 • 7.-00 • 8:50 



HOME FOR HOLIDAYS (pe-«) 

FriyMonyTU«s. 7^0 

8at/3un7WedyThur. 

1i«0 • 4:10 • 7:20 



MONEY TRAIN (*) 



Dally 8:45 



GOLDEN EYE (pe-i3) 

FriyMonyTUes. 6:40 • 9:30 

SaL/SunTWedyrhur. 

1:10 • 3^5 • 6:40 • 9:30 



MOVIE & TIMES START FRIDAY, 12/15/95 



.*•••****• 



-A-*-*-*.****.**.*** 



* LAKE ZURICH THEATRES * ANTIOCH THEATRE -395-0216* 



7,00-050-0000 
" Surround 'Sound 

lO Soroons 



* 50 MA* MtfSf m aSO CM*m (1 1 1 UWay 

IS050 



Daily Afternoon Shews 
Mon.-Fri.tU. Spin. 



370 Lake Street. Antioch 



■4. uo Aauna; "Z.(JO LnJoron 

(11 & under) 

Bargain Matirwe until 5:00 p.m. 



SAfllMA 

1:00-3:50^:50-0:15 



JUMUU1 

1:10-3:45^:40-9:10 



■UT 

12:45-4:45-8:15 



Frl. 0:45-0: Sot. & Sun. 2:15-4:30-0:45-0; 
MAT 0:45-0; W & T 2:15^:30^0:45-0 



MCHENRY INDOOR THEATRE 

12(14 Orix-n St. 
(b![>) in , in .; i 



'4.00 Adults; '2.00 CMdron (11 & undar) 
Malinoc Sal. & Sun. 18 5:00 



FATHU Of THE WUoi 2 

1:30-4:00-6:45-9:05 {PG) | 



AaVEHTUUB (PQ13) 

H IV 3*1 i to I »4 »T-i, H|TT*W4TJ »4»-T I 



TOTCTOtT 

12:15-2:154:15-6:30-8:30 (G) 



IT TWDE5 1W0 (PG) 

fitli.SM lSufii4»,mTIM,WlTUM 



Aa VTWT0U WIHI MTUtf CAU5 

12:30-2:30-4:30-7:00-9:00 (PG) 



asm 

12:30-4:30*00 



GOiKNin 

12:15-3:15^:15-8:15 



H. 1 45; S*. 1 Sun. 4.1M 4S; H 1 T I «, W 1 T 4.H4 « 



LIBERTY 1 & 2-362-3011 

708 N. MJUvnukee Ave ; . Liberty vitlo 



Adults '4™' 

Children 1 1 & Under •2 00 - 

2nd Bargain Mallnee 'Til 5 p.m. 



THE AMOJCAN PtiSBEKT 

1 2:45-3:40^:40-8:2 <PG13) 



ACEVDiTUlAll (PG13) 

FriT*.S«lS«f»4»HUiT7l,»firt»4»SM 



ITTAHSTWO 

1:15-3:50 

-mam 



Frl. I4S: S«l * Sin. 44:«S; U I T I4S: W * T 4-1 4S 



6:30-0:00 



ittaibiwo (pg> 



• ***••*****.*.+ * •-*■ + •*••*•**** 



DAILY MATINEES DURING CHRISTMAS SCHOOL BREAK 



CiNEplEX OdEON ThEATRES 





CMnixQrxcH 



RiyERTREE COUTl^X 



Sabritia' (PG) (Dolby Stereo) 
Fri, Mon-Thu (4:05) 7:00-9:40; Sat-Sun (1:10) 4:05-7:00-9:40 



Father of the Bride 2' (PG) (Dolby Stereo) (on 2 screens) 

Fri, Mon-Thu (4:30) 6: 30-7:30-9:00-9:50; 
Sat-Sun (1:30) 2:00-4:00-4:30-6:30-7:30-9:00-9:50 



Toy Story* (G) (Dolby Stereo) 

Fri, Mon-Thu (5:00) 7:00-9:00; Sat-Sun (IrOO) 3:03-5:00-7:00-9:00 



Jutnartjf (PG) (Dolby Stereo) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 5:25-7:45-10.00; Sat-Sun (1.O0) 3:15-5:25-7:45-10.H30 



The American President (PG-13) (Dolby Stereo) (on 2 screens) 

Fri, Mon-Thu (4:15) 6:30-7:15-9:15-9:45; 
Sat-Sun (1:00) 1:30-3:45-4:15-6:30-7:15-9:15-9:45 



Casino' (R) (DTS Digital) 

Fri, Mon-Thu (4:40) 6:15; Sat-Sun (1:20) 4:40-8:15 



HAS^MQRN CENTER 



Goldeneye (PG-13) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 7:00-9:45; Sat-Sun (1:30) 4:15-7:00-9:45 



3 



Get'Shorty (R) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 7:30-10:00; Sat-Sun (2:30) 5:00-7:30-10:00 



Heat' (R) (Dolby Stereo) (on 2 screens) 

Fri 5:15-6:15-8:30-9:30; Sat-Sun (11:45) 2:00-3:00-5:15-6:15-8:30-9:30 

Mon-Thu 5:45-8:00-9:00 



*NoP«ses 



-■/ 



LAKELIFE UkelANd Newspapers DtcEMbtn 1 5, 1995. 



RIVERTREE 



19283 W.Grand Ave. 

(Just west of Rte. 45) 



NURSE^MM 



C. 



frets 



Titiitsettla 



FREE! 4" PoiiisetUa 

with purchase of 

Christmas Tree 



•Balsam 
SentttxTint 



•Meat/is Keying 
ay Vtalitm 

24* MfdttTine 



9i> 



132 



RT.45 



•Christmas Cactus 'Boughs 'Firewood "Ivy Wreaths 

FREE Delivery Within 5 Miles 
BBS W 9B IB 356-8733 662-6290 




LAST MINUT 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 





COUPON 



TimWm half -pro papermcrTfor chmstmasJ 



!;-. r annie's 

I BOOK* 
I STOP 




100's of Pre-read Paperbacks j 

p 'Recycle Your Paperbacks 

& Save Moret 
'Seniors Save 10% 
On Tuesdays 
268 Hawthorne Village Commons 
(Between Dominicks & Watgreens) "Open Tues. 

Vernon Hills, IL j nru sun." J 



7T ' 

10% 

Off Final Cash 

Purchase 
wAhlsad^ 



jj ^pppj . (70 $) 680-5150 



£****: 



in 



ZT 



GROUP AND PRIVATE 
LESSONS r-szsn 

PAGER 89941IVE 



■ Open Water Certification 
■ Advanced Rescue 

■ Dive Master 
■ Asst, Instructor 

DEAN STONE 

P.A.D.I. Certified 

Master Scuba Diver 

Instructor Referrals Issued 

for Warm Water Testing 



Open Water 

Certification 

Includes: 
All Equipment, 
Manuals, Pool 

Fees, and 
Classroom Fees, 

Student needs 
nothing but 
a swim sidtl 



Only Private Lessons Left In 

fan. Netxl Group Class Starts 

Tuos- Fob. "Q Enrol Early 



Advanced Class 
| $I5Q Inc. everything 




ESTABLISHED 1672 



Kneeling Santa 
Ornament 

To teach his children the true meaning 
of Christmas, Raymond Gauer showed 
them Santa reverently bowing before 
the Christ Child. This ornament will 
touch the hearts of those who see it. 

$7.50 

Large Selection Of Christmas Gifts & Art To Choose From At Discount Prices 

-I -800-621 -4003 

822 Anita • Antioch, IL 60002 



r. 




Great Ideas For 

Christmas mm 

FROM 

John Deere 






v>v 






3 




fe 



I 

r 









¥'MMiWmmmtW^ f ^®tM^' i mMm' : :. 



ACTION BEEPER CORP* 

PAGER SALE 



Motorola Bravo $59.95" 
Motorola Bravo Plus $79.95' 

* No Connect Charges 

* Free Voice Mail 

* Free Delivery 

* Toll Free Numbers Available 

Full line of Motorola Pagers and accessories 

Visit our new store at 

223 Washington, Round Lake, IL 
(708) 546-9690 (800) 479-7288 

'With purchase of at least 1 month airtimo. Limited time offer. 




5* 



^ 

** 







1> 



a 




*■--*.• 



Come and see the most 
complete selection of 
farm toys anywhere in 
all sizes and prices, from 
miniature to pedal 
tractors. • 



Man* l/l<iN*k- 

Rt.ll.l JiltT' 



~^*SEg 



Collectors' Series and 
precision classic models 
will- satisfy the adult 
collector. 




^-*j\ 



■sag 



mm 




We also have shirts, 
caps, buckles, flags and 
many more gift ideas for 
the Deere enthusiastl 



NOTHING RUNS LIKE A DEERE* 



5^ 



m 




IMPLEMENT 
COMPANY i 






OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE SINCE 1923 

HY. 83, 5 Ml. NORTH OF ANTIOCH 

SALEM, Wl • 414-843-2326 « HOURS 8-5 MON.-SAT. 



v.v.y.y,.*y,y. v-:*-" -:-'-:-' 



Super Christmas 

at 



m 



NORTHWEST JEWELERS 

450 S. Rand Rd. ■ Lake Zurich, IL ■ Phone 438-0125 
All Precious, Semi-Precious, Diamond, & 14K Gold Jewelry In Stock 

Seiko Watches £^~ f ^%S M*^ ST*aT* We Carry LaSalle, 
In Stock ■% *% y€fc 11 1 I ESQ & Swatch 

OPEN EVERYDAY 'TIL CHRISTMAS!' 



50% off 



Watches 



m 



::■:'■'■'■'/!■{. U'.^'^^^^ 






'; i""", vlswIvii'Ww!' 



'.■x*.*, ,v- - f ---- .\\\-,v.i».- .■.■-<,>■ ;s ^i.".vi".". j .vX-;v;--v""i">"I'--^"s + i v ;■*'•■ .v ■*-.*. ■iv\v. , .vi , iVi'ivrt* , iWi 



*****a»Mi^ifcCtrti*P*«pl 



' -. ■ ■ 



■i ii rtM>t»WBW»*ft' 



PccEMbcn 1 ?, 19?S LAkelANd Newspapers COUNTY ■ jj 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



This year give one of the greatest gifts to your loved ones- 
the gift of a brighter fuiuret 

Personal Performance Careers 

Career Consulting with Human Resources Profes 

Career Search & Selection 

Effective Resume" Writing 

Professional Interviewing Techniques 

Salary Negotiation 

(708)838-6823 

Gift Certificates available - $25 & up 



raw *■-«««•. H'/ 






year-Long 





IJOCKKY'SKATKS 




• Girls • Boys • Womend • Men's 

• Bauer? TURBOS 

• oauer? CHARGERS 
1 1 • aaimR PAKTHIR 

Super Tacki Hockey 

*G£3E3 RAPDf 



A MOTOROLA BRAVO 
CLASSIC PERSONAL PAGER 

PAGER plus 
1-YEARAIRTIME 

$134"* 



SPORTS CENTER 

927 MAIN ST. ANTIOCH • 395-621 6 395-6212 

<Zhe Christmas Store ^ot S.pott$ fans! 



FREE DELIVERY TO YOUR DOOR 
NO CONNECTION FEE 



Call All-Tech for Monthly 
Rates as low as $6.95 



Mention This Ad & Receive 
an Additional $5 Offl 



.HK''^ mn ^^ ■■m mm mm mem <mmt mm aca b^b ^hi hk i^m ^^ ^^ ^^ ^™» ^^ ^ 

J NOW_OPEN AT 6A.M.M i?flfl/£ OJHEI^JJJSCAFE i 

I 
I 

I 



ABSOLUTELY FREE 

CUP OF COFFEE OFTHE DAY -TOPPED WITH WHIPPED CREAM — with coupon. Witts i/)W6 



All-Tech Communications 
Call 438-6411 



*P1lwTax 
Expinfen 12/31/95 






ESPRESSO, CAPPUCCINO, 

1LATTE, MOCHA AND A VARIETY 
OF THE FRESHEST 
BREWED COFFEES 





ALSO, TRY OUR DELICIOUS MUFFINS, ■ 

SCONES, BROWNIES, SWEET ROUS, CAKESJ 

COOKIES, BISCUITS, AND MUCK MORE! I 

COKE FOUNTAIN SERVICE ■ 

JUICE AND MILK, TOOI \'\ 



521 N. Milwaukee, Libertyville 367-8494 

Plenty ol Parting • Easy Front & Roar Entrance 



&&* 





00 



Road 



32 Peterson 
LibeiiyyiOe 

* 247-1525 

Feed Your Pet And < 
Ielp Peed The Needy 

10% OF ALL PROCEEDS BETWEEN DECEMBER 1-23 WILL 
BE DONATED TO THE CHRISTIAN OUTREACH FOOD PANTRY. 



10% 



ANY PURCHASE $10.00 OR MORE 
WITH THIS COUPON 



NOT VAUD WITH OTHER OFFERS. 
EXPIRES 12/23/95 



*o 



3/4 Mil© S. of 

Hwy. 50 on 

83rd St; - 

Just 5 minutes 

west of 1*94 

(414)857-2316 




10 GALLON DELUXE 
STARTER COMBO 




o a 




FREE 8 QZ CHEESE 
SPREAD WITH THIS AD 



■ in r^ 



m 



Reg, 
$49.99 



COMBO INCLUDES: 

10 Gallon Black Tank 

20" Inc. Black Hood 

Bubbler Corner Filter 

IPC Plus 8' SOW Heater 

XP440 Air Pump 

8' Airline Tubing 

Standing Thermometer 

4" Aquamist Bar 

VN2 Air Valve 

4" Fish Net 

Filter Floss 

' Carbon 
First Aquarium Book 







Wm LAKEUFE UkclAwI NewspApCRS DcccMb» 1 5, 1999. 



Where To 
Eat 





t 



%mm 



FEATURE 

OF THE 
WEEK 




fifswmr 



Family Owned .Since 19-1' 



(Overlooking Beautiful 
Long Lake 

And Frigate Lounge 

Sunday, Dec 17 



Join The 



"Brunch 
with 
Santa J FUfl! 



Adults $8.95 Seniow$7.95 

Children 

<-io $3.95 



QuHrtn 
Vnier6 $2.95 



and 
Sat., Dec. 16 

Filet & Shrimp De Jonghe $ 1 1.95 
Prime Rib with 2 Fantail Shrimp $12.95 
Crab Legs - Ml You Can Eat - Only $18.95 

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT During Dinner. 

"Uncle Jess & The Stardusters" 
Rollins Road - Ingleside 

Only 8 miles 
west of Gumco 



FAIRMONT SHORES 

RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 
587-1900 

Q/(Ht> fuwen, t lived til vow ve (fried oun., 

•Jimmy Burgers ^Blackened Chicken Sandwich 

•Chicken Wings •Carolina Burgers 

•Cajun Fries •THE BEST RIBS •Much Morell 

•Southern Style Fish Fry on Friday {kg ! Q g 
• Includes Black Beans & Rice 



ClojedMoo. 
Open Tuc>. . Wed. & Than il 4 pm; 

Fri„ S»l.& SuD.il 11:30 ijn. 
Kitchen Open Fri. 4 S*L lil mJdnijht 



Take Route 59 to Bald Eagle Rd. 

(Between Monaville & Grand Ave.) to 

Lakeshore Dr.-rifiht to deadend. 





Sabatini's 
Restaurant 
has fantastic 
Champagne 
___ Brunch 

The Sabatinl family, owners of 

the Sabatlni Restaurant and 

Frigate's Lounge on Long Lake, 

invites everyone to Join in the year 

long celebration of the 49th 

anniversary of the start of their 

business. 

Three generations of Sabatinis 

have been in the restaurant. 

business since 1947. Ralph 

Sabatini states, "You'll always find 

a Sabatini on the premises!" Even 

the chef, Ralph Rossi, is a cousin 

hailing from Italy. Although the 

restaurant is an old and honored 

one, the menu is new with a 
variety of Italian specialties mixed 
with outstanding Steaks, Ribs and Fresh Fish- 
Diners will enjoy the many specials, including the Friday 
Fish Fry and Variety Buffet for only $8.95 (kids $4.95). 
Sabatini's offers many seafood selections, plus ribs, chicken, 
beef, and a large dessert table. Their home-made breads arc 
an extra added attraction. Saturday night's special is all- 
you-can-cat crab legs. 

Sunday's Champagne Brunch, which includes 
unlimited champagne, fruit juices and homemade pastries, 
is popular at $8.95 for adults, $7.95 for senior citizens, and 
children arc $3.95. Enjoy the brunch, served overlooking 
beautiful Long Lake, between 9:30 am. to 2 p.m. Santa will 
be at Sabatini's for brunch on Dec 1 and 17. 

On all Thursdays in December, the restaurant will offer 
such dinner specials as all-you-can-eat crab legs, prime rib 
at $7.95, seniors, $6.95. Indudcd in those specials are a filet 
and shrimp for $9.95. 

Senior Citizens will enjoy the Senior Specials offered on 
Mondays and Wednesday evenings when people over 55 
get a complete dinner with a cocktail for only $6.50. 

On Thursdays, Don and, Laura will entertain you in the 
Frigate Lounge while you sip on one of their superb 
maigaritas for just $1 .95. 

Sabatini's Restaurant & Frigate Lounge also has banquet 
facilities that accommodates up to 200 people. To reserve a 
date, call 587-3211, 

Enjoy a relaxing, delicious meal and a breathtaking view 
of Long Lake at Sabatini's Restaurant & Frigate Lounge at 
25250 W. Lake Shore Dr., in Ingleside (on Rollins Rd., 
between Wilson and Fairfield). Sabatini's is open Tues. 
through Sat at 4 p.m., and Sun. at 930 am. Sabatini's will 
rc-open on Mondays beginning in ApriL 




fcf New Year 's Eve %$ 



p CAPT, 

as 



At 






476 Liberty (Rl. 176), Wauconda 

Dinner Package Includes: 

Choice of Special Appetizer - Caesar Salad 

Choice of Entree 

6 oz. Filet Mlenon with Jumbo Shrimp 

King. Cut Prime Rib Au Jus 

9-10 oz. Black Angus Filet Mlgnon 

1-1/2 lbs. Snow Crab Legs 

10 or. Grilled Sword Fish 

Dessert of Cheesecake with Strawberries 

Coffee or Tea., 

Glass of Champagne 



$24" 




/(: Di Jtta/tco s 



fiaftoila dl donaponll 



*** I J hit it • //.»//.»/ 1 ( '.i lish if • 

HEW YEAR'S EVE PARTY J 

5:30, 7:30, 9:30 §ontings / 



EartjBrd Upjs. 
CMOUAnyDirm 
cWthlWiAi 



aysr 
All You Can; 
Eat Cod 

$6.95. 



Valet Parking Every 
• Frt. & Sat, 



Sec Out 91 cut J*60& 



OPEN: Tuee.-Sat. at 5:00 p.m. • Sun. 4:00 pjn. • Closed Monday 

Holiday Partlos • Banquets Available • Accepting Reservations 

(708) 395-B883 * 683 Main St., Antloch, IL 




Dining on the Lake... 

GALE SWEET INN 
Diamond Lake 

A Casual Country Atmosphere 
Specializing in Fresh Seafood, Prime Rib, 

BARBECUED RIBS Pruilc Steaks and Chops, an 
-since 1963 Award Winning Salad Bar 

AGALESTREBTTRADmON and Templing Desserts. 
LUNCH & DINNER 

Party and Banquet Facilities (20-200) 
Show Lounge - Dancing 

now appearing "ARNIE EVANS SHOW 1 
906 Diamond Lake Rd., Mundcleln 

566-1 OOP 



UmiiiH III H[I|ITTT 







RJ's Eatery 

& The Outback Bar 



Heads, 



PLAN YOUR HOLIDAY 
PARTY AT RJS!!! 



356-2300 



PlMI 



1913 E.GRAND AVE.. UNDENHURST op.n:Non.*it11UL*SundiTl1 

Directors; From 1*4, K 

Waft. 132 (Grind Aw.) ** 

p*dGumMMil»,W«Urni« (J 




Bring Your Family. 
Video. Game Room For Kids 



yiiiiiniilllllUlllll 



Call Early For Reservations: 526-0606 £$ 



Hillside Family Restaurant 

/ Where Meals Are Homemade! . 



Hillside *1 " Breakfast Special 

7 a.m. to 11 a.m. Monday-Friday, except holidays 

2 Eggs any style, 2 Pancakes, 2 Sausage Links j 

or 2 Strips ol Bacon 




"Perched on a slight rise beside Illinois Highway 83 in GRAYSLAKE. 
the Hillside Family Restaurant lives up to Its. name." 

_,, . -Virginia Mullery 

Chicago Tribune 



Lakemoor* 
Our AU Now 
Banquet 
For Up 
People. 

CHECK OUT OUR ALL HEW MENU INCLUDING 

•Kids Menu 
•Pasta -Pasta -Pasta 
•Extended Sandwich Menu 

Plus all of your favorites. 



SEHCflcrnzHrt 
special ub«j 

from It ua- » 
Spjn. Daily 



HILLSIDE FAMILY RESTAURANT ,. 



^ 804 Barron Blvd. (Rte. 83) < Grayslake 
■ 548-10.08 



8 

DAILY 
SPECIALS 

As 



FRIDAY FISH 



suw&av raonrv — 

•TYtBl DINNBRS) 



Don't Forget To Book Your Holiday 
Parties & Or Business Meetings 

On RL 120-2 1/2 miles Wast of RU2 on Lily Lmks just 10 minutes w«t of Grayslaka. 

(815)385-9869 



TERRY'Q 

I MEXICAN V 
RESTAURANT! BAR 

VotecI #1 
TRy Our 

New 
LuNck Spec.Als 

LARqE SeiECTiON of $TEAltS & SEAfood 

As We 11 As REqulAR Mexican food! 

Friday & SmmdAyl 



•Puts 
•SrMwbruj 

•Bk 



•CadiiLc 
•OnmCtuI 



• CIiipoHE RoAsrcd Duck 

• RoAmd Peak 

• Roast Beef Ttudfiloin 
oa SiabiM Strip Roast 

That En nets Amc Ratty Dclkious! 

^ PRIVATE ROOM 

UON-FR111AM-10PU AVAILABLE! 

•NoSMokmqAacA 
• liARdicAppcd Accessible 



•CLOSED SUNDAY 



TERRY'C 

■ MEXICAN W 
RESTAURANT & BAR 

B 10CATED IN IHE I WWIEY COMMONS SHOPPING ONIER 

I25N. SEYMOUR - MUNDELEIN, IL rS fTL»Jfo 



566-9550 i 



aaaeasi - bk . - ,^, , , 



...."•".";. . ;. • . .; 



-rtf 



];- 






s 



DtcetibtR 15,1995 UktlANd Newspapers LAKEUFE 





S/hjffttfZftftf t'r $CrJftfi(/f 

' fine ninini;/( as.ial AUirc 



Celebrate New Year's 

Weekend 
December 30 & 81 






300 X. Forest - Fox Lake 



.HE 




Where To 
Eat Out 



Room 

■Cocktail Lounge 
•Catering 
•Banquet FadllHe* 



HOLIDAY SPECIALS AT 

MERS 

SURF & TURF $16.95 

SERVED NIGHTLY. INCLUDES SOUP OR TOSSED SALAD. 



I 



SHRIMP SPECTACULAR 

$8.95 lf 

SERVED NIGHTLY. INCLUDES SOUP 
OR TOSSED SALAD. 

Open 

Christmas Bw Day. OUForBesemttm' 

miLwmwiKom ioa.m.-2pjn. J)Zb"DyUD 




l(fljxndeU5 mml 

J 305 S. Rte. 83, Grayslake J 

! (708)223-9402 i 

|, , Open Daily 11-11; Sun. 8 a.HL-11 p.m. ■ 

I 
I 
I 
I 

I 



I 

I 
I 



ALIrTOU-CAN EAT FAMILY NIGHTS 

Tuesdays . .. \ .Broasted Chicken 
Thursdays ........ .Crab Legs 

Fridays Fish Fry 



■ ALSO DON'T FORGET!! 



J ... Sundays ... Breakfast Buffet , 

Dinner- 

And *$ 
Cocktails 



Parkway is the restaurant 
for all seafood lovers 

Calling all seafood lovers! The Parkway Restaurant on 
Belvidcre Rd. in Waukcgan is the restaurant for you! Don't 
miss the "Fish Feast" featuring broiled or fried haddock, 
including chowder, potato and salad, all for $7.95. 

You'll also want to try the Boston Clam Chowder and 
watch for the succulent Seafood Bisque that usually 
appears on the menu every four weeks. This spicy Bisque 
is made with a lobster base and crab meat Other features 
include fresh baked salmon with hollandalse sauce, and 
"Oysters Lorenzo" (baked oysters on the half-shell topped 
with a creamy mushroom sauce, doused with crab flakes ■ 
and sprinkled with parmesan cheese). Owner Peter 
Paulson is proud of the Shrimp de Jonghc casserole with 
just the right amount of garlic, creating a tantalizing 
aroma 

Seafood is not Parkway's only epicurean forte. The 
restaurant is well-known for choice beef selections such 
as prime rib, Parkway Fillet and 16-ounce strip steak, 
among others. Choose from a petite cut of prime rib for 
only $14.95. The regular cut is a bargain at $16.95. Some of 
the more popular entrees are the fresh braised lamb 
shanks for $11.95, and delicious BBQ Baby Back Ribs. 
Parkway's desserts pleases the sweet tooth, especially the . 
red layer cake, a multi-layered devil's food concoction, 
and a variety of homemade pics. 

Parkway has been a family-run business for 50 years, 
with second-generation owner Peter Paulson getting help 
from his wife and son, Martin. Paulson feels that people 
that come to Parkway arc secure in the fact that the 
restaurant has been able to maintain a professional staff 
with minimal turnover through the years. 
»•" Partcwnyljfin^i'grcarloiiatlon 1 tor northern Lake 
County and has been the site for many lucrative business 
luncheons. As Parkway staff likes to say, "If your lunch is 
important, you should be having it at Parkway!" 

Parkway has three separate dining rooms, each with 
its own individual bar,. that can accommodate 20 to 90 
people for various occasions. Book your event early -by 
calling Parkway at 336-0222 for reservations. Parkway will 
be open on Christmas Eve Sunday, Dec 24, from noon to 
8 p.m. The restaurant Is open for lunch Tuesday through 
Friday and daily at 4 p.m. for dinner . 



FEATURE 

OF THE 

WEEK 





- FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 



,: 




COMPLIMENTARY 

SHRIMP COCKTAIL 

IF YOUORDER DIMMER 

BEFORE 6:00 



m. 



. 




r- SUNDAY CHRISTMAS EVE 

ROAST PRIME 
RIB OF BEEF 



$16.95 



DANISH STYLE bin qc 
IROAST GOOSE^KTO 

Apple Plum Stuffing. *-.-,- 



?, 



m 



3035 BELVIDERE RD. , WAUKEGAN, /L 

(708)536-0222 



OPENSUNDAY 






CHRISTMAS EVE 12:00-6:00 

- ■ ' ' 





COUPON 



HOLIDAY SPECIAL 
Steak & Lobster 

! $14.95 

Limit 4 guests per table. One coupon per table. 
With'This Coupon. Expirespec. 30J995_ 



I f'J 



m JOIN US ON NEW YEAR'S EVE. 
i OPEN 3:00 TILL 11:00 P.M. 
($ SERVING OUR REGULAR MENU 



94 AND '95 WINNER OF 
BEST STEAK!" 

HOME OF 

COLOSSAL 32 OZ. STEAKS, SIRLOIN 

& PORTERHOUSE 

RIBS • SEAFOOD • PRIME RIB • CHICKEN 

"WATCH OUR CHEF COOK 

YOUR 
STEAK TO PERFECTION?" 



Chinese Restaurant & Lounge 




SERVING LUNCH G DINNER 



LUNCH BUFFET 

Monday thru Friday 

(Lakehurst Location Only) 



Db^rtyvllle^ 

7oa/ai%6S8ai 




OPEN 7 
DAYS A 
WEEK 




.. OvUkfctikttumlCtll ' 



Happy Holidays From All Of Us 

COME SEE WHY WE WERE VOTED #1 PIZZA 

In Lake County By The Chicago Tribune 

Home of Taste of Chicago's Award Winning Chill 

Silver Platter Award Winner-World Class BBQ Ribs 

NEWI Heart-Healthy Menu 



PLAN YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY WITH US!!! 

CALL NOW AND RESERVE OUR HAYLOFT FOR: 

•Office Parlies •Family Parties 

_l I II _J - *+. _ m. -■- - ._li. ^.^ "■_** I _ i *—-. 1 . *\_ 



. '.. CASUAL DINING IN A UNIQUE ATMOSPHERE ■ 
\ ."• BANQUET FACILITIES FOR 20-100 



■ 625 ROCKLAND RD. (Rt. 176) 

LAKE BLUFF 

1^708-234-6660!^, 

I Mo ru-Thurs. 1 1 a.m.- 1 p.m., 

Fri/SiL 11 ijn.-U pm, 



H» 



356-5200 

1818 Grandwood Dr. tu«,tih«.*.iopjt.; 

Frf.-S*L4-I1 pm.; 

Gurnoe »«.«im". 





.BOARDWALK 



BlufF Lake & Gross Lake Rds. 

in Old Port Gove Marina 

Antloch. Illinois 

(708) 3*>5-8335 



SM£ 




•Join us Friday Dec. 15th For' 
OUR TEAIIAN BUFFET 

All you care to eat 5-9 pm $7.95 



Enjoy Our All You Cart To Eat 
FRIDAY IVTTE FISH FRY 

$ 6.95 



— SATURDAY NOV — 

Enjoy Our All You Care To Eat 

HUME Hill OR HUH) SHRIMP 

5-tOp.m. 




Book Your 
Holiday Party 

Now! 



Open 4pm Friday 
Noon Saturday 





Make Vour Reservations Now 

For Vour New Year's ■** 
Celebration Parry With Us! 



No Cover Caittt 

McBride 






j! LAKE LIFE LaI<eIan<1 Newspapers DtctMbtR 15, 1995 



fCrossworcI 



ACROSS 

■ 1 Task 
4 Hoodlum 
8 History 
chapters 

12 Caesar's 
"I love" 

13 Emanation 

14 Bonkers 

15 Wildlife 
conservation 
park 

16 Grooms who 
were bachelors 

18 He's dead on 
his feet 

20 Bagel topping 

21 Elevator man 
24 Specified by 

example 
28 "Seurat's 



44 Yule quaff " 22 Pentameter 
46 Irangate VIP . portion 

50 Historic 23 Recoiled 

Israeli P.M. 25 Lagniappes 

55 George's brother 26 Entertainer 

56 Tom Joad, e.g. Adams 

57 Farm fraction . 27 Say it isn't 



58 Shared by. us 

59 "Cheers" 
offering 

60 Start a garden 

61 Kennedy or 
Koppel 

DOWN 

1 Satchmo's 

forte 

2 *Typec" sequel 

3 Time of 

prosperity 

4 Samantha's 
daughter 



Lunch" painter 5 Shade 
32 Carnival 6 Grecian vessel 



attraction 

33 See 42 Down 

34 Hardy of 
fashion 

36 Kcglcr's 
target 

37 Makeup artist? 
39 Vince Edwards 

role 
41 HOldup 
43 Out of play 



7 Highlander 

8 Panacea 

9 Charles Duttoft 
sitcom 

10 Take a part? 

11 ** — your old 
man!" 

17 One of Snow 
White's pals 

19 Derek and 
Diddlcy 



so 

28 Worn, as tires 

29 Pennsylvania 
port 

30 "Hud" Oscar 
winner * " 

31 Hawaiian goose 
35 Read bar codes 
38 Yogi Bear's 

thwarter 
40 Fuss 
42 With 33 
Across, Lionel 
Richie song 
45 Mardi — 

47 Disturbance 
of the peace 

48 Authentic 

49 Unyielding 

50 Newhart 
sitcom 

51 —out a living 

52 Never, in 
Nuremberg 

53 "Rocks" 

54 Raw rocks 



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^ Answers 




ARIES (March 21 to 
April 19) This is a great 
week for you and your sig- 
nificant other. Romance is 
highlighted and rapport is 
excellent. Socially, you 
shine and arc sought out by 
many. Sift through those in- 
vitations and enjoy! 

TAURUS (April 20 to 
May 20) Research beckons 
early in the week as you try 
to make sense of a difficult 
project. Later, you find the 
solution to what's been 
holding you up and are 
surprised at how simple it 
really is. Enjoy social visits 
this weekend. 

GEMINI (May 21 to 
June 20) It's a good week 
for making major invest- . 
ment and financial 
decisions since your judg- 
ment is right on the mark. 
However, make sure you 
include that special some- 
one in the decision-making 
process to avoid any pos- 
sible arguments. 

CANCER (June 21 to 
July 22) Communicative 
skills are accented highly 
now. Whatever you wish 
for seems to come your way 
just for the asking. How- 
ever, the latter part of the 
week is best for maintain- 
ing a lower profile. This 
weekend, the spotlight is on 
romance. 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) Career developments 
occur behind the scenes, 
but they're all positive. Op- 



portunities come this week 
through friendship. Later in 
the week, your mental ac- 
: complishmcnts arc awe-in- 
spiring. The weekend 
brings plans for a get- 
together. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) A co- 
worker is determined to 
throw a wrench into the 
works and you're puzzled 
as to the reason for this. In- 
stead of getting angry, try to 
talk to this person and find 
out what's going on. The 
answer is bound to en- 
lighten you. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) You. need to 
use your powers of 
diplomacy now when deal- 
ing with bigwigs and col- 
leagues on the job. Later in 
the week, discussions about 
your career are. very impor- 
tant. On the home front, 
extra duties beckon. 

SCORPIO (October 23 
to November 21) Take 
heart. Even though a friend 
you haven't seen in a while 
cancels a planned visit, you 
will' soon see .each other 
anyway. It's n great time for 
those of you in love as 
romance is thrilling. Be 
careful not to overspend. 

SAGITTARIUS 
(November 22 to Decem- 
ber 21) You have a tenden- 
cy now to overreact to what 
a close friend is saying. In 
general, you are overly sen- 
sitive this week and could 




find yourself in a few spats 
as a.rcsult. This weekend is 
good for getting your 
thoughts across to others. 

CAPRICORN (Decem- 
ber 22 to January 19) You 
can stop worrying about 
what's going on at work 
since there's only so much 
control you can exert. This 
situation rights itself if left 
alone. It's a good week to 
catch up on your reading. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
to February 1 8) Someone at 
work is touchy, but other- 
wise, it's smooth sailing 
with career interests this 
week. -A friend could be 
down in the doldrums but 
you have the power to cheer 
this person out of it. 
. PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) A new mental 
interest captivates you this 
week and in the weeks to 
come. You are' able later in 
the week to patch up a dif- 
ficult situation with -a 
friend. Use the weekend for 
domestic diores. 

01995 by King FeilurejSynd. 



I 



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Many In-Stpre Specials 



One of No. Illinois Largest Dealers of 
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KWtgaaa n-t i tru i —xt Mfcn 



BJBjttarai. 




It's tIhe taII< of The town 

Get 'it off youR chesT (708) 22 5 ""807 5 



DtcEwbca 15, 1995 UkrlAwd Newspapers LIPSERVICE 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 




.Upservlce is a phone-In column presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no claim to 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does 
not claim the content or the subject matter as fact but as the per- 
sonal opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the 
right to edit copy or to retrain from printing a message: Call In at 
223-8073 and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although the 
call is anonymous, please leave your village name. 



JULIE helps 

In response to the person that made 
a comment about JULIE. When you 
call JULIE, they come out and locate 
your gas. phone. Com Ed and 
cable, most of Ihe time. Whoever tt 
was sh'ould *get Ihelr facts straight* 
before calling Inl 

Facts were wrong 

I'm calling to comment about the 
person who wrote that JULIE Is only 
for gas line location. JULIE Is used 
for gas, electric, phone, and cable. 
I'm an electrical contractor and I 
call them at least once a week to 
use their services. 

Ritalin helps 

Fl'm calling from Antloch concern- 
ing Ihe Issue of ADD and Ritalin use. " 
I am the molher of a girl who was 
on Ritalin from age 3 to 8. With this, 
she was able to channel herener- 
gy In a positive way, which allows 
her not only to develop her.lntelll- 
gence. but her creativity. She Is 
now a Junior high, honor student 
and has been so for the past three 
years. By the way, she hasn't used 
Ritalin for four years. 

i|| First signs, now lights 

\/^' Wato up>.Tox uato mm homoowrv 

* - 



ersl Jim Sernmerling Is discriminating 
agglnst all of us because of a few . 
people who've alienated him previ- 
ously. He said the signs had to come 
down, or else. What about other 
subdivision signs like East Shore 
Gardens?- Where are our govern- 
mental representatives? No one has 
any control over this man. Now he's 
turning out the street lights In Fox 
Lake Hlllsl Does anyone care? 

No to harness 

This Is to 'Use harness too." I was a 
school bus driver and I can tell you 
that If you want your child In a seat 
belt and a harness, you can easily 
plan on sending your child to 
school an hour to an hour-and-a- 
half sooner. Because each time 
the driver picks up a child, he/she 
will have to make sure the child, 
gets fastened In and the harness Is 
•on property. Your child will be gone 
longer and the school will be paid 
more, the drivers will be paid more, 
etc. Every cost" goes up If this 
should happen. The drivers would 
be on the rood longer, etc. The 
buses are designed to protect a 
child If they stay In their seats. A 
responsible driver will make sure 
the children are In their seats and 
help them understand that. It's for 

1l-iolr safety. 



Don't demolish 

I'm calling about Grant Township 
needing a new building. Why don't 
they take over Gavin -Central's 
building? It's a huge building. They- 
could . even have . the highway 
department and all there! There's 
plenty of room. They could sand- 
blast It and It would look like new. 
.Why demolish tt when It's paid for 
by taxpayers money In the first 
place? This building Is already there 
and not In too bad of shape. We 
could save a lot of money. ' 

Take an interest 

Parents of West Oak Middle School 
In Mundelein, It's time you really 
learned what's going on. Not too 
long ago, my son came home to 
Inform me that the police had 
been called to his bus to arrest two 
girls for fighting. Mot only that, the 
police have been called a couple 
of times for similar Incidents. These 
are sixth, seventh, and eighth 
graders. I reatlze working Is Impor- 
tant to all of us, and so Is money. 
But It's time you took an Interest. In 
your children and what they're 
doihgl 

Rose is great 

I've lived In Mundelein for a long 
time and ! think Chief Rose Is doing 
a wonderful Job. Unfortunately, the 
attttude of some "of his officers Is 
beyond comment. Maybe they 
should take a few lessons from him. 

Stop tragedy 

I Just got through reading the 
Round Lake News and noticed the 
mtio article about the water tank 



being put on Hart's Hill. The Jewel of 
the area Is going to have a water 
tank on It? They'll turn this Into 
another Industrial . trash area. 
Someone has to stop thlsl Contact 
the park district and stop- this 
tragedy! It will ruin the most beauti- 
ful spot in the areal \ 

Must be nice 

Does anyone recall what . was 
going on the morning of Nov. 28? 
The morning of slush. Ice, and 
snow? We don't all rate as good as 
the Ace Hardware store, where the 
township was plowing at 5:33 am. It 
must be nice! 

Incorrect 

The person who put the ad in the 
paper that said JUUE is only for gas 
lines. Is not correct. You call JULIE 
any time you go out and dig. It's 
not only for gas llnesl 

Give 'em a chance 

This Is for the Halnesvllle Police 
Department. I think we ought to 
give those guys a chance. A lot of 
them are new. Let's give the chief 
a chance, he's making some good 
changes. 

Enlightening 

I would like to thank Lakeland 
Newspapers for publishing the dan- 
gers that are Inherent In Goals 2000 
and In Outcome Based Education. 
. Thanks for enlightening the public 
on this Issue. 

Three of seven 

This is In response to the recent letter 
from Maudeen .Meyer. In the letters 



. to the editor section. She states that 
the school board doesn't care 
about the kids, only two of the seven 
have children In the district. Get your 
facts right. It's actually; three who 
have children In the district. 

Look after us. 

I'm calling from Ingleslde and unin- 
corporated Grant Township. Before; 
Grant Township builds anything, 
let's concentrate on reducing den- 
sity and slowing development., 
"Kiesgenvllle" may not be here 
soon If we're annexed to Fox Lake 
or Volo. We may go bankrupt in 
paying school taxes. So Gordy and 
crew, why not spend your energy 
and time at open meetings at 
Lakes Region, or at the Round Lake 
PUD hearings? Or how about- hav- 
ing the town meeting with the Four 
Oaks developers? Remember, you 
were elected to look after the tax- 
payers' Interests and not your ownl 

Parents should sue 

I'm. getting tired about hearing 
about the Fox River Grove school bus 
tragedy. It seems like It's everybody's 
posstole fault but the one who really 
caused the accident. What It really 
bois down to Is toot the accident 
happened because of the driver 
and her own stupidity. She's a super- 
visor and should have been able to 
-take care- of things. The parents 
ought to think about suing her. By the 
way. she's being hired as a driver at 
her old company. 

Shut your yap 

To the person who complained 
See LIPSERVICE page B30 




NEWS 12 20 






THETALKOFLAKECOUNTY 

WITH THE 13 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS 
^LISTEN FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN HOLIDAY GIFTS FROM 









in Antioch 



i 



Casual Family Dining 



ELECTRIC 




O At Lambs Farm 
(708) 362-5050 




JCTJ-94&RL176 
LibcrtyviUc, EL 



HAPPYLAND. PET CENTER 

For Your Pels & Everything They Need 

Wadsworth Road & Lewis Ave. in Beach Park 

* 




HILLERYS RIBS & BBQ 

The Secnet is in t he Saace! 

14th Street.North Chicago-Lewis Ave, Waukeflan 



RANDELTS ^Merlin's 



Casual Family Dining 
Grayslake 



Don Miller 

2(08.Nodh Lev/is 
V/ MUFFLERS BRAKE Waiikcqan Illinois 6O0H7 

1 70H l 662- 1 * J 5 





LAR 



GREENHOUSE 

EnsEnarmHsnEE 




"-MARCUS-^ 

m 




MR.CS MEATS & DELI ' 

38478 N. StwrldM BmcH PuK IL 

336-6666 



SIIVINQ lA*t COUNIY UNCI II7« 



L_THEATRES_I 

GU2NEE CINEMA 

6144 Grand Avenue 
Gurnee, Illinois 60031 




•X 





MERRY CHRISTMAS & HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM 

ALL OF US AT NEWS 1220 WKRS 





..CJt 





. 






] LIPSERVICE '■ LaI<eIan(I Newspapers DcccMbtR 1 f, 1 995 



LIPSERVICE 



It's tIhie taIIc of The 

Get iT off youR cUest (708) 22 



Tow/rsj 

5-8075 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



From page B29 

about the person who complained 
about Round Lake not calling JULIE 
and having their phone line cut. If 
you knew anything, you would 
know Ihat the *J* In JULIE stands for 
"joint." which means all utilities— 
gas, phone, water, and electric. 
You should get your facts straight 
before opening your yap to cor- 
rect someone who was right In the 
first place. 

Newsletter misused 

I resent the village of Round Lake 
Heights sending out a newsletter 
for house decorating and an aera- 
tor fund when our water rates are 
going sky high. Plus, they don't let 
us know- when they're putting a 
tavern In our village. The chicken 
man gets to party. They can send 
us a newsletter, but It's supposed to 
be to Inform the residents what's 
going on In the village, not as a 
personal agenda for the mayor 
and his funky board of trustees. 

Technicalities 

I'd like to know why the village of 
Fox lake went to court about the 
elephant called Lydla and why the 
village lost their case against the 
gentleman they had to call Info 
court, the owner of the elephant. 
They lost on a technicality. I 
thought the police were so good, 
up on everything and all the ordi- 
nances. What happened? Why 
weren't they doing their Job? Why 
did they get oft on a technicality? 

Call and see 

This Is in response to a caller of a 
couple of weeks ago about the 
Prairie Grass Festival. I'm sure the 
money was paid back because 



Rich Hill guaranteed It. If you're so 
In doubt, call the Round Lake Park 
District. I'm sure they know every- 
thing about the money. 

Wrong facts 

I'm calling about Ihe person that 
called and complained about 
JULIE. JULIE Is more than Just for gas. 
That's why they call It "Joint Utility 
Locallon." If you're going to call 
and complain, get your facts 
straight. • 

Sick about trees 

I'm absolutely sick to my stomach. 
We moved to Antloch and we 
picked a particular spot because 
of the beautiful old trees across the 
road. Now the developer building 
on the land Is cutting them all 
down. I talked to one of the sales- 
men. Who looked me right In 1he 
eye and said they were building 
around all of them. I called the 
office yesterday and some clown 
said "I don't know anything about 
It." It seems to me that trees 200 or 
150 years old could be saved and 
built around. They lied right to my 
face. They did It on the weekend, 
too, when you can't call the village 
and put a stop to Itl 

Take opposition 

I wish the village of . Mundeleln 
would- quit hiding behind false 
claims of looking at a westward 
move of Route 53. 1 think it's time to 
take opposition Instead of saying In 
the paper they have no choice but 
to support the preferred location of 
a toll booth in their village, when 
they have a right to oppose It. 
They're supposed to have a voice 
and they failed to use It. What 
good Is it doing for Mundeleln to 



remain In the Corridor Planning 
. Council when they're going to be 
bullied by Buffalo Grove, 
Uberlyvllle, and other communities. 
Wake up, Mundeleln, and oppose 
this tollway that will ruin Lake 
County! 

Valuable cargo 

A truck' driver Is responsible for his 
.cargo, a ship's captain Is responsi- 
ble for his ship. How come It's dif- 
ferent for school bus drivers? I guess 
■kids as cargo aren't that valuable. 

Control your kids 

In letting your children run around 
wild In shopping centers, ■ do the 
parents think they're doing right? If 
the kids do this In stores or any- 
where else. Is that what they do at 
home? You're not helping these 
kids, you're hurting them. There's a 
limit to what a child can do. If you 



say something to the parents, they 
tell you to mind your own business. 
But If a child should happen to get 
hurt, who do they blame? The 
storel It's not their fault, It's the par- 
ents' fault. 

Beware of scam 

Well, whoever.it is that's selling 
pocket planners for the Girl Scouts 
In Round Lake Beach, I think Jt's a 
scam. It has last year's dates. 
Beware I 

People have spoken 

The people of Lake County have 
spoken. Al Salvl's people have spo- 
ken. The Republican party has 
endorsed the better candidate 
and I'm realty glad to see that. You 
can hide behind the skirts of the 
supporters you have In Grant 
Township, but they're only a drop in 
the bucket compared to the peo- 



ple of the state, Go back to prac- 
ticing lawl 

Well-paid staff 

About the comment In last week's 
(Dec. 8) Fox Lake Press about main- 
taining the schools, such as Gavin 
School. North, we do have a super- 
intendent that takes care of all the 
schools, and also a building and 
grounds supervisor. These people 
are well paid. So If there was any 
.problem with the schools being 
dirty, they.should have done some- 
thing about It right away. If they 
can't control 1he people working 
for them, they should go to a 
cleaning service. 

Did we pay? 

Can you tell me who-pald for the 
Antloch Library's Christmas dinner? 
Was It the taxpayers? 
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Dcccxbci 1J, 199? Ukclwd Newspapers LIPSERVICE f 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



From page B30 

Greedy bureaucrats 

I am amazed at dl the children 
that are apparently being drugged 
with Ritalin and Prozac for behav- 
ioral situations. Parents 20 and 25 
yeas ago didn't have nealy the 
magnitude of these problems, 
Maybe. It was better parenting, a 
more hands-on approach rather 
than the popular "let the govern- 
ment's school raise my kids' atti- 
tude of today's parents, if the 
Ritalin/Prozac approach is valid, 
then the government's National 
Institute of Health should announce 
that a behavioral epidemic Is now 
present In our society. But maybe 
It's Just the educational establish- 
ment abusing the special educa- 
tion status of children so they can 
access more money, I'm afraid this 
Is the case. 

Be animals' voice 

Thanks to the. man who provided 
the telephone number for the 
Illinois Dept. of Agriculture. (312) 
814-6900. Due to an emergency, I 
had to stop at a local pet store. On 
the countertop were a number of 
rabbits In an aquarium. They had 
no room to move around and sat 
head-to-tail like lumps. The sales- 
person's comment was that they 
were small when placed Into the 
aquarium. If the store has to sell live 
, animals to make a buck, they have 
the responsibility to provide for the 
animals In a humane way as the 
.animals grow. The animals have no 



9HB 



voice but yours. Please shop only In 
pet supply stores that sell Just that— 
pet supplies. If you shop at one that 
has animals and see abuse going 
on, tell the store manager/owner 
and contact the proper authorities. 

Job well done 

I'd like to know If anyone has ever 
really . thanked the people at 
Cambridge Mobil Home Park In 
Round Lake. Art and Wayne are 
hard workers . and keep this park 
going great. I've been here to 
years and It's time to say thanks. Art 
and Waynel 

Hats off 

Hats off to Round Lake's Zoning 
Board Chairman Magna and his 
group, for not rushing Into a high- 
density Fennell-produced develop- 
ment. 

Scrooges 

If Lakeland Newspapers ever 
decides to give out a weekly 
weenie award, my nomination for 
this week would be Emmons 
Grade School In Antloch. Like all 
schools, Emmons has an eligibility 
requirement for sports. Any stu- 
dent falling one class or more Is 
kicked off the team for the year. 
But at a time when parents and 
community alike are doing all 
they can In getting Wds involved 
In extra-curricular activities to 
keep them off the streets, drugs, 
gangs, or worse, the administra- 
tion came up with the tacky Idea 
of puffing grade eligibility require- 



ments on all their extra-curricular 
activities, Including the Christmas 
program for the kids, So much for 
good will towards men. What a 
bah-humbug phllosophyl 

About birth control 

This Is about birth control Issues- 
contraception, childbirth, and 
abortion. In view of the raging 
controversy over abortion and all 
of its ramifications that are quite 
serious, let me mention an article 
from a survey by the Kalser-H arris 
Foundation Fact Finders, which 
states that most women are 
either not Informed or misin- 
formed about a morning after pill, 
which will prevent an unwanted 
pregnancy within the first 72 hours 
after unprotected sex. This Is cur- 
rently available In this country, yet 
most doctors don't mention It or 
advise It. I wonder why; when It 
could be an excellent solution to 



a vexing problem. Ask your doc- 
tor next time, Planned 
Parenthood doesn't use or men- 
tion It either. Maybe this should 
be mentioned In the sex educa- 
tion courses In school. 

Ruining the country 

This Is a comment on the destruc- 
tion of vital, basic services and 
programs designed for the poor- 
est, sickest, and most dependent 
part of our country's population. 
This took some 30 years to accom- 
plish, and this Congress will demol- 
. Ish It shortly If allowed. This was put 
together by wise, far-seeing Indi- 
viduals In a compassionate, 
thoughtful way. Now we see our 
smug politicians unabashedly giv- 
ing themselves raises, strutting 
about, behaving like spoiled chil- 
dren, blaspheming each other 
and the highest office In the land. 
Hiding behind the most Judgmen- 



tal, narrow-minded, non-Chrfst-lIke 
bunch In this country, Is the so- 
called Christian Coalition, who 
wouldn't know Christ if he sat 
beside them. They also do not fol- 
low the very Instructions they 
spout. Jesus said, 'Whatever you 
do to the least of these, you do 
also to me." These factions don't 
represent me. and I think a whole 
lot of folks feel as I do.. Speak up, 
folks! 

Double dipping 

It seems to me that certain doctors 
In the Fox Lake/lngleslde area like 
to take patients' money and then 
get reimbursed by the Insurance 
companies and not pay you back 
the money they owe you. I've 
been waiting since September to 
get my $48 and they keep saying 
they'll get It to me, but they never 
do. Sounds like double dipping to 
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Lakeland Newspapers' in-depth progress edition, Forefronts, will be published Feb. 9, 1996. We are 
seeking reader input for use in this special section. Please return your comments by Dec. 17 to: 

Forefronts Survey 
Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. You can also fax us at 223-881 or 

G rays lake, I L 60030 E-Mail response to: edit@lnd.com 

1 . Who is the most influential person in Lake County? ; ; : 

2. What is the top recreational spot in Lake County? ' : ; 

3. Name your favorite Lake County restaurant. . 

4. What is the best night spot in Lake County? \ ] 

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Town in which you live. 



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| ■ |] COUNTY UkelANcI Newspapers Dcctmbcn 1 ?, 1995 




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Dec cm b™ 15,1995 UltflANd Newspapers CtASSIFIED 




LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 






PUBLIC NOTICE 

ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Fiscal and Shared Sorvlcos Comer 

Financial Outreach Services 

100 North First Slrool 
Springllold, Illinois 62777-0001 
Grant Community High School 1 124 
285 E. Grand, Fox Lako, IL 60020 
ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR PUBLICATION 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED June 30, 1995 
(Socilon 10-17 of the School Coda) 
SIZE OF DISTRICT IN SQUARE MILES: 31; NUMBER OF. ATTENDANCE CENTERS: 1; NUM- 
BER OF CERTIFICATED EMPLOYEES: FULL-TIME 53; PART-TIME 29; NUMBER OF NON-CER- 
TIFICATED EMPLOYEES: FULL-TIME 22; PART-TIME 32; AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE: 845; 
NUMBER OF PUPILS ENROLLED PER GRADE: NINTH 247; TENTH 213; ELEVENTH 191; 
TWELFTH 194. TOTAL IN DISTRICT 845. 
TAX RATE BY FUND (IN %) 

EDUCATIONAL 1.170; OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE .395; WORKING CASH .050; 
TRANSPORTATION .066; MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT .035; SOCIAL SECURRY .027; TORT 
IMMUNITY .020. DISTRICT ASSESSED VALUATION: $326,029,415; TOTAL BONDED INDEBT- 
EDNESS June 30, 1995 -0-; PERCENT OF BONDING POWER OBLIGATED CURRENTLY -0-. 

{ASSETS - VALUE OF CAPITAL ASSETS - BASIS OF VALUATION USED) Land - $332,500 - 
Per 6/30/95 Audit; Buildings - $8,012,643 - Per 6/30/95 Audit; Equipment - $1,051 ,266 - Per 6/30/95 

Audit. 

GROSS PAYMENT FOR NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL 

Salary Range: Lora Than $15,000 

Jesse B. Anderson, Kalherlne R. Braun, Tommy Brezlnskl, Chorl L Coby, Patricia A. Hoxlo, 
Jollroy R. Hurley, Ruth H. Igyarto, David P. Jakstas, Laurel L Jensen, Michael C. Junge, Susan A. 
Kennedy, Erin Klein, Luana Kratz, Bonnie L'Abbe, Fred Lotfredo, Mickey Mandol, Davfd E. Martin, 
Joyce F. Matthol, Judith A. Milbr, Michael J. Mueller, Susan M. MuslnskJ, Roswilha Mut, Barbara J. 
Ogryzok. Julia A. Portalskt, Loslolgh Rivera, Donna J. Sanford, Betty A. Smith. Joseph Smith, 
Mardole Stewart, Lauren L. TrinchotHJa, Norman Uselton, Robert Vamo. 
Salary Range: $15,000-324,999 

Sharon L. Burr, Debbie Carole,. James M. Casey, Craig R. Do war, Janet J. Dledrich, Susan E. 
Eberlo, Carolyn Henderson, Diane Klesgon, Carolyn G. Ully, Rosemary Uplnskl, Margaret Smith, 
Lawrence W. Stenzel, Janet WUson-Harr. 
Salary Range: $25,000-$39,999 

Dennis E. Froy. Charles Guthrey, Timothy Jackson, Charione Manusos, Paul D. Melortas, Nick 
Miller, Lee Poarce, Roddle L. Threadgin. 
Salary Range: $40,000 and Over 

William C. Kloepffor. 

GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTI FICATED PERSONNEL 
Salary Range: Less Than $15,000 

Richard Bocmer, Diane Bevis, John N. Christiansen, Nick Ckxotosto, Michael Dolezal, Chris 
Dreyer, Robin K. Green, Donna Haack, Susan K. Harding, Joyce M. Heneberry, James A. Jones, 
Frank Kazlausky, Brian KibMowsW, Lauren M. Manusos, Deborah Mauzer, Maria M. MombQIe, 
Bonnie Mordowskl, Tiffany Multra, Constance Murphy, Mary L. Obenaul, Danute J. Pilman, Casey R. 
Pulnam, Glna M. Ralner, Jerry Robinson, Stephanie L Romlc, Kurt J. Rous, Joan Sagort, John W. 
Walter. .. \ 

Salary Range: $1 5,000-$24,999 

Laura GalRz. 
Salary Range: $25,000-$3 9,999 

Kayo M. Barczak, Victoria M. Bryant. Satabeth Busta. Christopher R. Butt. EBeen Chavez, 
Thorns* A. Evans, Mark A. Fahl Ing , Richard L. Free, Doris K. Gho rman , Lori A Holmes, Kenneth W. 
-, Manm, Jr., K«l V A. McNally, Jmmm C. Mufcra. Thomu J. O*tttlno. Mtk» U . Prabte. M«*y Lou Ctoo* . 

■ l Marcy Wax-Bbgdanowtcz, Susan M. Wings, Katharine M. Ziouraw. " 

Salary Range: $40,000 & Over 

Mark J. Barczak, Thomas F. Baron, John N. Bonedell, Michael J. Boyan, Frank Clttadlno, Cheryl 
• Collins, Elton Corey, Sheryl Dompsey, David W. Elnhom, George Faoro, Robecca R. Foster, Andrea 

L. Gananger. Lawrence Gartanger. Glenn A. HofeWt, Lynda J. Holokfl. Sandra J. Hun, Richard J. 

Jellnek, Terry' A Johnson, David F. Kapraun, Robert Kohler, Robert Koftz, David L. Lang, Thomas 

G. Maple, Patricia McCarm, Elizabeth MutHn, Karen Murphy, Lee Raddatz, Pamela Renaker, William 



L. Ronaker, Susan Richardson, Donald Rowden. Sam Spasokrvkh, Susan Thompson. Diane VWa. 

- VENDOR LISTING 
AT&T 1,223.87; ACT Publications 1 ,792.50; Advantage Supply Company 6,360.65; Aetna Life 
Insurance; Alpha Baking Co., Inc. 4,576.65; Allondale 133,076.52; Ameritech Mobile 
Communications 1,198.35; Amgas, Inc. 22,412.14; Antloch Community High School 1,824.00; 
Antloch Quick Print 1292.80; Apple Computers 19,013.00; Asbestos Control Methods, Inc. 
2,850.00; Barron Paint & Docorallng, Inc. 2,604.25; Jay's Foods, L.L.C. 1,359.50; Bridge View 
Extended Day School 24,510.07; Calculators, Inc. 2.585.00; Camolot Care Centers. Inc. 
24,210.56; Carblt Paint Co. 1,669.59; Carbondalo Comm. High School 3,870.00; Cardinal Arts & 
Cralts 1,023.37; Cary Dairy 8,094.49; Central Electric Co. 1,133,15; Champion Products 6,334.38; 
Chom-Rlto Products 1,238.02; Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 15,149.30; Condon Medical Center 
11,000.00; Commonwealth Edison 93,924.43; Commonwealth Edison 2,759.84; Computer 
Systems 38,502.45; Continental Baking Co., Inc. 2.846.14; Country Companies Services, Inc. 
65,133.64; D&G Sign and Label 1,097.55; D.M. Reeling, Inc. 39.933.25; The Decision Systems 
Co. 2,916.35; Lanter Company 1,13458; Demco 1,607,52; A.B. Dick Company 1,926.66; Ebsco 
Subscription Services 2,051.19; Educational Consultants 1,375.00; Elek-tek, Inc. 4.079.93; The 
Ellon Corporation 7,351.29; First Commonwealth 4,264.55; Fisher Bros. Construction Co., Inc. 
16,873.44; Flaghouse 1,101.70; Gordon Flesch 3.477.31; FoDotl Library Resources 3,1 12.87; Fox • 
Lako Ace Hardware 5,597.95; Fox Lake Bowl 3,010.00; Drake's Olllco Supply 3,605.45; Fox Rtvor " 
Foods 16,407.30; GAA Oil 18,351.22; GSC Errvlronmenlal Lab, Inc. 6.405.00; GCS Service. Inc. 
1,43255; Gateway 2000 3,488.00; General Binding Corporation 2,277.30; General Embroidery 
Company 2,700.45; Glenklrk Assoc, lor Retarded Citizens 3,584.80;' Graphic 14, Inc. 1.256.05; 
Grossman Plumbing Co., Inc. 7,959i41; Harcourt Brace Jovanovlch Co. 2,113.82; AJ. Harltinger 
1,351.98; Hayden's Sport Centor 4,295.30; D.C. Heath Company 1,617.21; Heritage Schools 
66,604.71; Home Juice Company 1.619.65; Hotel Nlkko Chicago 1,668.06; Hughes, Inc. 2.535.00; 
Hughes Buslnoss Telephones, Inc. 1,181.99; IASB 3,473.00; Ameritech 11,093.05; Illinois Stale 
Bd. ol Education 1,955.10; Information Access 1,288.00; Intl Thompson Publishing 2,97158; (TP 
Education 1,548.03; Jerry's Parkway Foods 1,784.09; Jostens 2.488.87; Jostens - Yearbook 
14,85525; Karnes Music Co. 3,004.98; Kranz, Inc. 1,703.05; Krazy-Kralts 1,288.33; Lake County 
H.S. Tech. Campus 118.850.48; LCESC 5,60551; Conserv FS 3,73052; Lake County Hoallh 
Dopt. 2,706.00; Lake Cry Transportation Sys, Inc. 5.860.40; Lakeland Equipment Specialist 
7,925.00; Lakeland Publishers, Inc. 1,115.91; Lake Villa Laundry 7,752.00; Lambs Farm 2,319.50; 
Lawson Produds 1,138.61; The Learlng House 23,582.00; Leslie Paper 11,81250; Rosalie 
Loirredo 9,240.00; McGovom's Athletic Equip. Co. 9,484.00; McGraw-Hill, Inc. 7,09453; McKee 
Foods Corporation 4,298.44; Manusos General Contracting. Inc. 171.257.94; Aramark Uniform 
Services 4,062.19; Midwest Transit Company 70,202,63; Lee Mleure 8,853.36; Nasco 1,053.81; 
National School Bus Service, Inc. 114,441.75; Replacement Window Systems, Inc. 3.643.00; 
NewsBank 1,725.00; Newshlre Forms, Inc. 1,59725; Nielsen Enterprises 2,400.00; Nlles 
Township High Schools 1,290.00; Northern Illinois Gas 12,407.12; Northern Suburban Special 
Education 26,314.30; North Shore Office Machines 15,498.46; O.G. Glass Co. 2,433.67; 
OfficeMax, Inc. 1,408.71; OfficeMax, Inc. 1,882.77; Olympla Computing Co., Inc. 1,54720; Palos 
Sports, Inc. 3,63052; Patera Power & Lighting, Inc. 2,538.06; Pepsi-Cola 14,926.45; Porta Phone 
Co. 1,274.00; Prentice Hall 1,363.14; Price Service 7,941.02; Prime Stripe, inc. 1,894.10; Pyramid 
Art Supply 2,420.28; R&M Business Systems, Inc. 1,97758; R&W Enterprises 1,622.00; Lots O' 
Licks 2,487.70; Retco Alloy Co. 1,820.63; Ray Chevrolet & Geo, Inc. 3,67427; Rlcmar Industries 
8.164.47; Rlddell All American 2.34955; The Riverside Publishing Co. 1,218.08; Robbtns, 
Schwartz, Nicholas, Litton 7,853.05; Ace Hardware - Round Lake 1,182.64; Rodgers & 
Hammersteln Theatre Library 1,441.25; Rogers Athletic Co. 1 ,825.94; Rubber Floor Products, Inc. 
2,650.00; Ruck, Pate & Associates, Ltd. 22.836.35; SEDOL 607,879.41; Scantron 1,783.30; 
Schmidt Custom Floors, Inc. 17,307.00; School Lock Company 2,31050; Scott Foresman and Co. 
2,75458; Herman Seekamp, Inc. 2,06757; Sherman Plumbing & Healing, Inc. 1 ,035.48; Shoreline 
Graphics 2,908.08; Skjalos & Associates, Ltd. 74,374.00; Simplex Time Recorder Co. 6,056.00; 
Steven C. Smith Company 47/443.00; Social Issues Resources Series 1250.00; Spec. Ed. ot 
McHenry County 8,30455; Sports .Imports 3,022.32-. Sportsman Spotting- Goods 2.08O.7O; 

Stevens Gnomical c. 4,109.30; Summit School, Inc. 16,154.60; Sysco Food Services 37,816.11; 
Techstar America Corporation 4293.04; Thelen Sand & Gravel, Inc. 225258.11; 303 Cab 
Association, Inc. 69,423.00; Triarco Arts & Crafts, Inc. 2220.39; TruGreen 5,270.00; Unum Lie 
Insurance Co. 2,613.52; Varsity Spirit Fashions 1,614.30;. Village of Fox Lake 9,72555; Volleyball 
One 1.374.50; Waste Management of Lake Cty., 6.333.94; Waukegan Safe & Lock Ltd. 1266.07; 
Wenger Corp. 9,325.00; West Suburban Law Center, Ltd. 2,777.70; Western Athlelte Supply 
1,036.31. Total 2,749,500.73. 





ACCT. 




OPERATIONS 


ASSETS 


NO. 


EDUCATIONAL 


AND MAINTENANCE 


CURRENT ASSETS (100) 








I.Cash 


101-105 


105,705 


. 1,578,083 


2. Other Accrued AsseUfGAAP) 130,140,162, 








181.192 






3. Taxes Recehrable (GAAP) 


110 


1,978,607 


656,774 


4. Accounts Receivable (GAAP) 


120 


64,366 




5. Loan to Educational Fund 


151 






6. Loan to Operations and 








Maintenance' Fund 


152 






7. Loan to Transportation Fund 


153 


m 


. 


8. Loan to Fire Prevention and Safety 154 






9. Loan lo Other Funds 


155 




.-• 


10. Inventory 


170 




. . . 


11. Investments 


180 






12. Other Current Assets 


199 






1 3. TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS 




2.148.678 


2234,857 


LIABILTTIESAND . 








FUND BALANCE 








CURRENT LIABILITIES (400) 








1. Accrued Liabilities (GAAP) 402,411-415, 






420.441,442,461 


354,634 


120,194 


2. Corporate Personal Property 








Replacement Tax Anticipation 








Notes Payable 


406 






3. Anticipation Warrants Payable 


407 








4. Antfcbatbn Notes Payable 


408. 








5. Teachers' Orders Payable 


409 







6. State Aid Anticipation 








Certificates Payable 


410 






7. Loan from Educational Fund 


431 






8. Loan Irom Operations 








and Maintenance Fund 


432 






9. Loan (ram Transportation Fund 


433 






10. Loan from Working Cash Fund 


434 


637,382 




11, Payroll Deductions Payable 


450 


12,302 




1Z Deferred Revenue 








(Modified Accrual) 


474 


3,856.472 


1,280.069 


1 3. Duo to Activity Fund 








Organizations 


480 






14. Other Current Liabilities 


499 


, 




LONG TERM LIABILITIES (500) 








15. Bonds Payable 


501 






16. Other Long-Term Liabilities 


599 






17, TOTAL LIABILITIES ^ 




4,860,790 ' 


. 1,400,283 ■ 


IS. Reserved Fund Balance 


703 




. 


19. Unreserved Fund Balance 


704 


(2.712,112) 


834.574 . 


20. Investments In General , 








Fixed Assets 


705 






21. TOTAL LIABILITIES 








AND FUND BALANCE 




2.148,678 


2,234,857 


. 


STATELIER ulo. 


RECEIPTS/REVENUES 








1. Local Sources 


1000 


4,190,606 


1,499,869 


2. Flow Through Revenue from 








Cno LEA toAnlolherLEA 


2000 


10,526 





3. State Sources 


3000 


486.412 





4. Federal Sources 


4000 


142,668 





5, TOTAL RECEIPTS/REVENUES 




4,830,212 


1,499,869 


DISBURSEMENTS/ 


FUNCT, 






EXPENDITURES 


NO. 






6, Instruction 


1000 


3,322,227 





INDIVIDUAL FUND BALANCE SHEETS June 30, 1995 
BOND MUr^AL RETIREMENT/ SffE AND CONSmiCTION/ 

AND INTEREST TRANSPORTATION SOCIAL SECURfTY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT 



172,575 
■159,755 



30,807 

143 

109,758 



217,939 

216 
103,248 



WORKING CASH 
796,499 

83.132 
637,382 



RENT 



FIRE PREVENTION 
AID SAFETY 



332,330 



100,000 
240,708 

18237 



100,000 
421,403 



1517,013 



311,110 



213,888 



200,925 



162,036 



311,110 
21,220 

332,330 
(PENDITU 

309,113 


309.113 



232,125 
8,583 

240,708 
ANCING £ 

199.621 


144,791 


344,412 



200,925 
220,478 

421,403 
.ANDCrL 

28,607 







28,607 

22,134 



162,036 
1.354,977 

1.517.013 
R ENDED J 

166,398 
166,398 



Continued on next page 



-~-± 










CLASSIFIEDS LaI<fJan<! Newspapcrs DtccMbca 1 J, 1 V9S 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
IntorWeb Communications 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED 
OR TRANS-ACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 1B01 Hiawatha Trail. 
Round Lake Heights, IL 60073. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESSfES) OF THE PER- 
SON^) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANS-ACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Michael J. 
Williams, 1B01 Hiawatha Trail. 
Round Lake Heights, IL 
60073; David S. Williams, 
1801 Hiawatha Trail, Round 
Lako Heights, IL 60073. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This b to certify that the 
undersigned Intend(s) to con- 
duct Iho abovo named busi- 
ness Irom the locallon(s) Indi- 
cated and that the true or real 
lull namo(s) ol Iho persons) 
owning, conducting. or Uan&- 
actlng tho business are coned 
as shown. 
Michael J. Williams 
David S. Williams 
November 14, 1995 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by tho person(s) Intending to 
conduct the business this 
November 14, 1995. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Margaret L Sullivan 

Notary Public 

Received: November 17. 1995 

Wlllard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

I 1295A-414-RL 

December 1, 1995 

December 8, 1995 

December 15, 1995 



1 

LEGAL NOTICE 
PUBLICATION IS 

EASY AND 
CONVENIENT IN 
LAKELAND" 
NEWSPAPERS 

An Invitation Is extended to pubic 
bodies, attorneys, businesses 
and private citizens to use the 
publications ot Lakeland 
Newspapers tor convenient, effi- 
cient and economical publication 
required tor Legal Notice by the 
State ol Illinois statutes. 
Legal notices may be placed In 
person at our- centrally located 
business office, 30 a Whitney 
SI, Graystake. 60030. or sent by 
rray or FAX, 708-223-8810. The 
telephone number Is 708-223- 
8161. 

The 13 community newspaper 
publications of Lakeland 
Newspapers meet all the statutory 
requirements tor Legal Notice In 
Lake County, III. Our rales are eco- 
nomical and our deadline Is the 
latest in Lake County. We regular- 
ly provide publication service 
under the tightest lima restrictions 
The Lakeland stall is experi- 
enced In the unique requirements 
tor Public Notice. We am ready to 
assist "you with your questions 
and all your Public Notice needs 
For questions and rale Informa- 
tion, please eel Brenda Conner 
at (708) '223-8161, at 128. Let 
us serve you with Legal Notice 
pubDcaUorLThankybu, . 

The .Punster 
Lakeland Newspapers 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Associate's Newsletter Bureau 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED 
OR TRANS-ACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 1323 Downs 
Parkway. Ubottyvllle, IL 60048. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SONS) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANS-ACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Jamos R. 
Loman, 1323 Downs Parkway, 
Llbortyvlllo, IL 60046. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify thai the 
undersigned Intend(s) to eon- 
duct tho abovo named busi- 
ness from the k)cation(s) Indi- 
cated and that the true or real 
lull namo(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or trans- 
acting tho business are correct 
as shown. 
Jamon R . Leman 
Novo mb or 20, 1995 

Tho foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by the person (s) Intending to 
conduct the business this 
November 20, 1995. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Tammy J. Gibson 

Notary Public 

Received: November 21. 1995 

Wlllard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1295A-423-LB 

December 1, 1995 

December 8, 1995 

December 15. 1995 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: R.E. 

Management 

ADDRESSES} WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED 
OR TRANS-ACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 506 Lincoln Ave., 
IngloskJc.tL 60041. 
NAME(S> AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SON^) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANS-ACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Robert C. 
Farris, 511 PIstakee Pkwy.. 
Fox Lake, IL 60020; Elsie M. 
Farris, 511 Plslakee Pwky., 
Fox Lake, IL 60020. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to cert It y that tho 
undersigned lntend(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the tocatlon(s) Indi- 
cated and thai the true or real 
full name(s) ot the person(s) 
owning, conducting or trans- 
acting the business are correct 

as shown. 
Robert C. Finis 

Elsie M. Farris 

November 18, 1995 

The foregoing Instrument 

was acknowledged before me 

by the porson(s) Intending to 

conduct the business this 

November 18, 1995. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Bomadlne E. Remblake 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: November 20, 1995 

Wlllard R. Helander 

'Lake County Clerk 

. 1295A-413-FL 

December 1,1995 

Decembers, 1995 

• December 15. 1995 



Case No. 95 C 3017 
Judge GETTLEMAN 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 27762 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Midtlrst Bank, Stato Savings Bank f/k/a 

MWflrsi Savings and Loan Association, 

PlatnllM, 
VS. 

Morrya L. Webb, Tho Countryside Hills 
Homeowners Association, 
Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 27762 
(IT IS ADVrSEDTHAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULTTHElR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 
In tho above entitled cause on fl ugiaJ B. 1995. 

I, Alan Mills, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
January 17, 1996 at the hour of 1 :30 p.m. at the front door of Lake 
County Courthouse, 18 N. County Street. Waukegan, Illinois, sell 
to the highest bidder (or cash, tho following described premises: 
Parcel 1: Lot 4 In Block 6 In Countryside Hills Unit 3, being a 
Subdivision ol Part of tho North 1/2 ol Section 17. Township 45 
North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, According 
to the Plat Thereof, Recorded January 16, 1987, as Document 
Number 2526874, In Lake County, Illinois. 

Parcel 2: A Non-Exclusive Perpetual Easement for ingress and 
Egress for Ihe Benollt of Parcel 1, as Created by Declaration tor 
Countryside Hills Home Recorded as Document Number 
2445184. 

c/k/a 510 Moadow Hill Lane, Round Like, IL 60073 
Tax ID* 06-17-126-016 

The Improvements on the property consist of townhouse, alu- 
minum, two story dwelling wflh a two car garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No relunds. The sale shall be subject to 
genera) taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
The |udgment amount was $76,830,45. 
Upon the sale being made Ihe purchaser will receive a Receipt 
ol Sato which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a specHled 
date unless the property to redeemed according to law. 

For Information call tho Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney. 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 Irom 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, Ihe Salos 
Officer Is noi required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. /s/ Atan Milts 

Special Commissioner 

1295B-435-GL 

December 8, 1995 

December 15, 1995 

December 22, 1995 

Decembor29, 1995 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: C&C 

Snacks 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED 
OR TRANS-ACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 280 Pebble Creek 
Dr., Banlngton, IL 60010. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESSfES) OF THE PER- 
SON^) OWNING. CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANS-ACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Laura 
Toomer, 280 Pebble Creek Dr., 
Barrington, IL 60010. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that tho 
undersigned Intend(s) lo con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the local ton(s) Indi- 
cated and that the true or real 
tuH name(s) ot the person(s) 
owning, conducting or trans- 
acting the business are correct 
as shown. 
Laura Toomer ' 
November 21, 1995 

The. foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by the porson(s) intending to 
conduct the business this 
November 21, 1995. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Eva M. Rivera 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: November 21, 1995 

Wlllard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1295A-412-WL 

December 1, 1995 

Decembers, 1995 

December 15, 1995 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 

Creative Advertising 

ADDRESSfES) WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED 
OR TRANS-ACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 1740 Clavlrrfa Ave., 
Deorfleld, IL 60015. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SONS) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANS-ACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Laura H. 
Wyatt, 1740 Clavlnla Ave., 
Doerf told, IL 60015. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned Intend(s) lo con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness Irom the 1ocalk>n(s) Indi- 
cated and that the true or real 
full name(s) ot the person(s) 
owning, conducting or Irans- 
adlno the business are correct 
as shown. 
Laura H. Wyatt 
November 30, 1995 

The toregolng instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by the personfa) tntondlng to 
conduct the business this 30th 
day ol November, 1995: 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Richard S. Cordes 

Notary Public 

Received: December 1, 1995 

Wlllard R. Helander 

. Lake County Clerk 

1295B-453-AR 

• December 8. 1995 

December 15, 1995 

December 22, 1995 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 27316 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
. EASTERN DIVISION 
Chemical Residential Mortgago Corporation, a 
New Jersey Corporation f/k/a Margaretten and 
Company, Inc. 

Plaintiff, Case No. 95 C 0536 

VS. Judge Undberg 

Paul E. Schiattman, 

Defendant. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 27316 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULTTHElR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice b hereby grvon pursuant to a Judgement entered 
In the above entitled cause on August 2S. 1995 . 

I, Stephen Nagy, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
January 11, 1996 at the hour ol 11:15 a.m. at Ihe front door ol 
Lake County Courthouse, Waukogan, Illinois, sell to the highest 
bidder tor cash, Ihe following doscr bod promises: 

Lot 47 in tho Willows at Greenwood Unit 1 , Bolng a Subdivision 
of Part ol the East 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4 ol Section 29, 
Township 45 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal 
Meridian, According to Ihe Plat Thereof, Recorded August 12, 
1991, as Document Number 3050809, In Lake County, Illinois, 
c/k/a 86 Abbey Lane, Round Lako Park, IL 60073 
Tax ID #06-29-224-009 

The Improvements on the property consist of single family, alu- 
minum siding, townhouse with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certllled lunds, balance wtlhln 24 
hours, certHlod funds. No refunds. The salo shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
Tho property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
Tho judgment amount was $143,281.36. 
Upon tho sale being made tho purchaser will receive a 
Certiftoalo ol Sate which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified dale unless tho property is redeemed according to law. 
For Information call the Salos Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Flshor, 30 North LaSallo, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4764 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sates 
Officer Is not required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. /s/ Stephen Naoy 

Special Commissioner 

12S5B-434-GL 

December 8, 1995 

December 15, 1995 

December 22, 1995 

December 29, 1995 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 
Public notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Petition on llio In tho 
Village Clerk's office of the Village ol Fax Lake, that a public hear- 
ing will be held on January 10, 1996 at 7:30 p.m. In tho Vllago 
Hall, Fax Lake, llinols, to hear the Petllon of Wllam E. Booth, 
Tom & Michelle Naber, owner of the following described real 
estate lo-wtt; 

Lot 11 In Rushmore Subdivision of Part of the Northwest 
Fractional Quarter of Section 11, Towrahto 45 North, Range 9 
East of the Third Principal Meridian. 

Tho physical location of the property b: Lot 11 In Rushmore 
Subdivision. 
The common address b: 29 Rushmore Road. 
Petitioner Is requesting the following: A three and five eighths 
(3-5/8*) Inch side yard variance. 

Said Petition b available for examination In the village Clerk's 
office at the Vllago Hall in Fax Lake, Illinois. 

AP Interested persons are Invited to attend said hearing and be 
heard. Respectfully submitted, 

RON STOCHL, Chairman 
Fax Lake Zoning Board of Appeals 
Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 
This 26th day of November. 1995 

1295C-466-FL 
December 15, 1995 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 
Public notice b horeby given pursuant to a PelBlon on fHo In the 
Village Clerk's office ot the Village of Fox Lake, that a public hear- 
ing will bo held on January 10. 1996 at 7:30 p.m. in the VBIago 
Hail, Fox Lake, Itflnob, to hear Ihe Petition of Robert G. Connelley, 
owner of tho following described real estate to-wit: 

Lots 221 and 222 In Wldlam T. SuBrvans HlUcrest Subdivision 
on Fax Lake, Being a Subdivision of Part of the Southwest 
Quarter of Section 10, Township 45 North. Range 9, East of the 
Third Principal Meridian, According lo the Plat Thereof, Rocorded 
April S, 1922, as Document 210529, In Book "L* of Plats, Page 1, 
In Lake County, Illinois, 

The physical location of the property b: Comer of Lilac Avenue 
and Pine Street. 

The common address b: 25 Lilac Avenue. 
Petitioner b requesting the following: Variance from tho mini- 
mal bulldablo lot area of six hundred and twenty five square feet 
(625 sq.ft.).. 

_ Said Petition Is available for examination In Ihe Village Clerk's 
office at the Village Hall In Fox Lake, Illinois. 

All interested persons are Invited to attend said hearing and bo 
heard. Respectfully submitted, 

RON STOCHL, Chairman 
Fax Lake Zoning Board of Appeals 
Dated at Fox Lake, IIHnob 
This 6th day ol December, 1995 

1295CM67-FL 
December 15, 1995 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
COUNTY ZONING NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS ) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) SS #2988 
TO WHOM fT MAY CONCERN: 

PUBLIC NOTICE Is hereby given to all persons In (he town of 
Fremont, Lake County, Illinois, that a public hearing will be hetd on 
Thursday, January 11, 1996, at 1:30 p.m., in Ihe Fremont 
Township Hall, 22376 W. Erhart Road, Mundeleln, IL 60060, rela- 
tive to a request to vary the terms of Chapter Two of tho Lake 
County Zoning Ordinance within the Neighborhood Conservation/ 
Urban ResldentlaKJa (NC/UR-3a) zone in the following manner: 
(1) To decrease the lol area requirement from 8,500 sq. ft. to 
7,575.50 sq. fl.; and (2) lo decrease the lot width requirement from 
50 loot to 44.52 ft. The subject property b legally described as fol- 
lows: 

Lot 134 In A.G. Schwerman's Third Sylvan Lako Subdivision, 
bolng a Subdivision ol tho Southeast Quarter of Section 34, 
Township 44 North, Range 10, East of Ihe Third Principal 
Meridian, according to the plat thereof recorded January 11, 
1 928, a3 Document 311401 , In Book "S* ol Plata, In Lake County, 
Illinois. 

The subject property b located on the north side of North 
Sylvan Lake Road, approximately one- half mile west of Midlothian 
Road, and contains approximately 7,700 sq. ft. 

As a result of tho petition of DAVID PRZESTRZELSKI and 
THERESE ANN PRZESTRZELSKI (record owners), 1240 
Lodestone Place, Tucson, Arizona 85737 and MARK BACKE 
(contract purchaser), 17 South Crescent Drive, Mundelafn, IL 
60060, which petition b on llio and available for examination In the 
olflce of tho Lake County Zoning Board of Appeals, County 
Administration Building, 18 N. County St., Waukegan, IL 60085. 
All Interested persons are Invited to attend said hoaring and be 
heard. 

LAKE COUNTY ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS ■ 
CLAYTON 1 CHRIBTFNRFN Chairman 
For this hoaring, reasonable accommodation will be made for 
handicapped persons, Thta Includes accommodation for the vision 
and hearing Impaired If a request b made wtlhln 48 hours ot tho 
meeting lime. 
Dated at Waukegan, Illinois, thb 11th day ol December 1995. 

1295C465-MN 
Decombor 15, 1995 



Continued from preceding page 


i 










• 


' 






7. Supporting Services 


2000 


1,138,965 


1,300,845 


' ■ 


468,153 


136,119 









70282 j 


8, Community Services 


3000 






















H 


9. Nonprogrammed Charges 


4000 


651,225 

















- 





H 


10. Debt Services 


5000 








296,541 















I i 


11. TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS/ 




















HH 


EXPENDITURES 




5.112,417 


1,300,645 


296,541 


468,153 


158,253 










70,282 


12. Excess of Rocebts/Revonues 




















i^HI 


Over (Under) Disbursements/ 




' 
















HQ 


Expenditures 




(282,205) 


199,024 


. 12,572 


(143,741) 


129,646 





166,398 





(70^82) 


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 


ACCT. 




















AND (USES) 


NO. 








- 






- 






13. Other Financing Sources 


7000 


89,445 























32,449 


14. Other Financing (Uses) 


6000 





93.833 





11,187 








16.874 





[ 


15. TOTAL OTHER FINANCING 






















SOURCES AND (USES) 




89,445 


(93,833) 





(11,187) 








(16.674) 





32,449 I i 


16. Excess of Receipts/Revenues and 




















Other Financing Sources Over (Under) 










. 










Dtsb.£xp. and Other Financing Uses 


(182.760} • 


105,191 


\2JS72 


(154,928) 


(129,646) 





149,524 





(37,633) 
37^33 


17. FUND BALANCES - Jj.y 1, 1994 




(2,519,352) 


729.383 


6,648 


163,511 


350,124 




1,205,453 




18. Other Charges in Fund Balances 






















Increases (Decreases) 














- 






* 


19. FUND BALANCES -June 30, 1995 


(2,712,112) 


834,574 


21,220 


8,583 


220,478 





1,354,977 





o • ' ■■ I 






















1295C-483-FL ! 




■ 
















• 


December 15, 1995 

























^ 



I 



"- ■'. ..--. 'l .', .•■■.' ;-.,- ■ *.-.-' .;,'■ . •'..■. ■•;, 






... 



DccfMbu 1 5, 1999 UkrlANci Newspapers CLASSIFIED 






- 



1 



a<i 



L 

■5 



of 
on 
int 

la- 
ta 
irV 
or: 
to 
>m 
!oh 

on, 
34, 
pal 
11. 
nty. 

>rth 
llan 

• 

ind 
240 

:ke 

l,IL 

ilhe 
jnty 
365. 

jbo 



a tor 
Islon 
Mho 

1995 



CLASSIFIED 
GUIDE 




Lost & Found „.„.„ 

Free.,,. ...„.....„, 



H.I. , ,,IIMI 



...110 

115 

.120 



Personals ....„ .'. 125 

Auctions.... „...„ „...„.......„...„„„ „„.150 

tllCSHllwJ rtlWlUU * IMIMNHHIHHttHMNMlHniHlMlimHmnillMHmfMljJ 

Flnindal..^„....„™„„. ...«.„..„„....,...„ „„.',„ ,_140 



■&y#<?&ii&#e- 




Hdp Wanted Part-Time „ „ „ 219 

Hdp Wanted Ftill-Tlme ... :,.„. „„....„. .....'„.„, 220 

Employment Agendo ..«, , „,„,.„,„^„.„....,221 

B us i ne ss Opportunities... „„, „.„„...„. „.,„ .......,,,,225 

Child Ore 

School/Ins trucll on 




Appliances. ««„„......„„ - 304 

mXtCX/ 1 [*UC,....M,M.., l .|..M.|..,.-.|..|i.,i.. 1 .;ii.iiri'..-...-.|l.h..... 1 .r|....i..JVU 

BzziinA^ rafts.. ,«. •»»*tM««i*i*» M *MiMi »*+*■■*<»»«*+•■ »M*«M*MM«Mii*»*M<4Mf 310 

Building Materials .«„ „ m ..„.3l4 



IHH1H4II 



Business/Office Equipment . 

Ekctronlcs/Computers 

Farm Guide . „ 

riFCWOOQ ■ mii — «t i m imi h «■»« ***** w 

Garase/Rurnmage Sales 

Good Things to Eat 

Horses & Tack. ............. ......... 

Household Goods/Furniture. . 

Jewelry™ «... 

Lawo/Cardcn-™ « „ .» - MB 

,m*sc cuin co liis .,,,., ,,,*„,... * . f -. j ju 

Medical Equlp/Suppues ...» ........ ~. 354 

Musical Instruments .....^ .._...«. .....^ „.„„.„358 

I CIS ex oUppUOS ,-,..... ..., — ..... r .jCHJ 

Restaurant Equipment ........ 364 

Tools & Machinery ..„.«»....«»»..,» ...»...,. .......368 

Wanted To Buy. „.„„ „ „ ...... 370 



318 
320 

328 

.....330 

.....338 
.....340 
344 



f. 



ReaI Estate 



Homes For Sale 

Homes For Rent. 

Homes Wanted. 

Homes Builders.... 

Condo/Town Homes .... 

Mobile Homes „.. 

Apartments For Rent .... 

Apartments Wanted 

Apt/Homes To Share.... 

Rooms For Kcnl. ..... ..... 

ni*UUn& .-,.-..:...,-.r., „■;,;_ 

Buslncss Property For Sale, 
Business Property For Rent 
Investment Property...... 

Mortgage Services 

rlTTTD ttn iMMw wwmiwHmwiii^ 

Vacant Lots/Acreage..... ...... 

Rcsorls/Vacatlon Rentals.... 



........•.-.■« 



Ill 
..500 
..504 
..508 

..■..- ■■? • " 

„,....„ 514 

inMHHMMIHtH^lD 

„-. 520 

.... . j£'l 

....,..,.-,.,.......528 

„„ 5 JO 

— .. ^„-.S33 

...«..„ ...,.5M 

........,,,....,,..,,jjo 

... 540 

544 

■ •■ ■■ -i <- J iu 

..... .560 

564 



Out of Area Property » «... 568 

Cemetery Lots ...- — . .» — 570 

Real Estate Wanted. — — 574 

Real Estates Misc. » 578 



w.-.v.. • - 



RecreationaI 



Recrcationa] Vehicles... I...- z 704 



Snowmobtle/ATV's 

Boats/Molors/Elc 

Camping i 

Travri/VacaUon........ 

Sports Equipment.... 

Airplanes ................. 



...... ..-..*. ...... ...i.. 






...■-.. .... 



,708 
,710 
,714 
,718 
,720 
,724 



Tran^^ 

Cars For Sale „„ „..; -.„ 804 

Rental/Leases ..„..„...„..„.....„ ......... 808 

Classic/Antique Cars - 810 

Servlce&Parts 1. -« 814 

Car Loans/Insurance -» 818 

Vans „ „ „ ... 824 

Four Wheel Drtvefleeps « «....— »...- 828 

Trucks/Trailers - - « •■ -- 834 

Heavy Equipment ......... 

Motorcycles - ~ 

Wanted To Buy. 



i 



,838 
,844 
..848 



Service Directory 

nDptlSDCCS KCOiir... WIWI M I l l MH WMI»HH*l«MM«MWt m*» HWmMWWj 

Blacktop - - »..S06 

Builders „ «».- S09 

Carpentry ««; -..,....„ ...„.« -..«... S12 

Carpet Cleaning ..,-.'... S15 

CorjcreteCemenL...... ...„„.„„„.„...„„.„. „ S18 

Dry Wall .«.».«...»»« ,,„,„,„,.,„„„ ...S21 

Educallon/Instruclloa S24 

Electrical „ „ , «~S27 

Firewood ~ «...., S30 

Handyman,..,. - „...„„„...„.,....... ...S33 

Heating/Air CondJUonlng S36 

Housekeepmg S39 

landscaping » „..„.,,.....S42 

Uundry/deanlng S45 

Legal Services ; — „- S48 

Medical Services - S51 

Movlng/Storagc. , — „ .'. S54 

Palntlng/Decoraiing » »7 

PatfiLegal/Typlng Services »0 

Plumbing » « »3 

Pools »6 

Pressure Washing - - Sb9 

Professional Services - S72 

Radio/TV Repair. •«..' S75 

Remodding. « '< S7 8 

Resumes «.;«..»- S81 

Rootbg/Sidlng....'. • S84 

Storage « S87 

TaServlce ; &> 

Trees/Plants U WJ 

Weddirjg.. •■• ««..... „.„„...^... »..S96 

Miscellaneous Servlcej....-...™... «...»...„...S99 



disTRibuTJON 



Twla 

Lakes- 



•Silver Ukt 



Kenosha 
County 

. •Bristol 



nichmond 



■Spring 



Jotutttws.' 



Mcttanry 



CryiW 
Uki : 

Ulcllciiry 
County 



^ 



■f^ib&a 



imn* 



■Ut» •Uhdinhurtt 
--Ro««4— .. _ GrtyiW« 

uit» r — v: 
LabeCo< 



•fferft 



•WtuconcSa 



****** ^*^ m ^ Ul.Fo r „,Y 



(Uiringlon 



•UnO 

Crovt 



■ Pililint 



Butlilo Grot* 



Melra 
— =Mllwaukee 
RR 




HOW TO PIACE A CLASSIFIED AD 



Call (708) 223-8161 



© 



•tfundfkbi 



Highland Park \\ 
•Dtcrftcid \l 



t'utik Courtly 




BY 
PHONE ... 

BY 
MAIL ... 



IN 
PERSON .. 



Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 26(1 
Grayslakc, IL 60030 



30 S. Whitney St., 
Grayslake 



lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 13 Newspapers! 

Antloch News-Reporter • Round Lake News • Lake Zurich Enterprise • 

Lake Villa Record • Mundelei n News • Warren-Newport Press • 

Grayslake Times • Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press • Lindenhurst News • 

Vernon Hills News • Wauconda Leader • Libertyville News 



lr=^j BY FAX ... (708) 223-8810 

DEADLINES 

Direct Line Tues. 5 pm 

, Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 

HOURS 

8 am - 8 pm Mon.-Thurs 

8 am - 6 pm Friday 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



f 



$ 



-j 



110 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



no 


Notices 



HERBALIFE 
THE EASY WEIGH 

Shape up and slim down with 

Herballle. 

Call Richard or Goorgann 

(708) 223-2517. 

ST. GILBERT 

HEW YEARS QAY BINGOt 

Two oospore, two bonanzas. 

' Six S500 o»n»»- 

Call Jim 
(708) 367-0410. 



BUY IT. 
SELL IT. 
FIND IT. 



SHERRY'S 

ELECTROLYSIS 

HAS HEW LOCATION. 

In Personal Touch Salon. 

457 N. Lako St. Mundeleln. 

(708) 049-6131 

1/2 off flrat 16 mlnutw, 

with thts ad. 
First Mm* ctUnta only. 



PARENTS- TOUGHLOVE a 
support group for parents ol 
troubled chlldren/leens, 

meets each week, at Round 
Lake Area Park Dlsl. room 
114. Located on Hart Rd. 
and Rte.134, Round Lake. 
GET THE SUPPORT 
YOU'VE BEEN LOOKING 
FORI Or call (800)926-1(103, 
For Information, 



GIFTS FOR THAT HARD 
TO BUY PERSON! 
Birthday news letters/ 
certificates with frames, 
astrology readings, 
and cooking redoes. 
For detalb send SASE: 
D. Bik 
P. O. Box 1091 
Lombard, ID. 
60148-1091. 



WANTED 

Antloch Community 

High School Is accepting 

donations of Cross Country 

Sid Equipment and Ice skates, 

\y good condition, for Its 
Physical Education program. 

Cash donations abo 

accepted. Call Steve Wapon 

or Pam Podstawa at ACHS 

(708) 395-1421 for details. 

Donations are tax deductible. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

ir you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers yau may 
receive a misleading state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for this 
advertising. Tb receive prop- 
er credit to your account, 
all payments for your Lake- 
Land Newspapers advertising 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

po Box aea 

SO 8. Whitney St. 
Orayilike, IL 60030-0268 




1 




DEPArTTMEHTOFTRANSPOfTTATION 

UNITED STATES COAST 
GUARD AUXILIARY 

(AirTHOFIZED BY CONGRESS t«5| 

THE CIVILIAN COMPONENT 
OF THE U.S. COAST GUARD 

U.S.C.G. AUX 
SAFE BOATING CLASS 

BEGIN JAN 9, 1996 

FROM 7-9 PM AT 

GRANT COMM. HIGH SCHOOL 

285 E. GRAND AVE. 

FOX LAKE, IL 

6 WK. COURSE, $25.00 



SARAH ANN 

Born May 16th 

Daughter of 

Barbara & Richard 
Granddaugbttr of 
Miriam & George 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Please check your ad on the FIRST Insertion date. In the 
event of an error or omission, we will be responsible tor 
ONLY the FIRST Incorrect insertion. The newspaper will be 
responsible lor only the portion of the ad that is in error. 
Please notify the Classified Department In the event of an 
error within 1 week of run data. CANCELLATIONS must be 
made prior to 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before publication. 

Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to properly clas- 
sify all advertising, edit or delete any objectionable wording, 
or reject any advertisement for credit or policy reasons. 

All Help Wanted advertising Is published under unified 
headings. Lakeland Newspapers does not knowingly accept 
help wanted advertising that in any way violates the Human 
Rights Act. 

PAYMENT IN ADVANCE IS REQUIRED FOR THESE ADS: 

•Advertisers out of Lakeland circulation area 

•Business Opportunities "Mobile Homes •Situations Wanted 

•Debt Disclaimers *Qarage and Moving Sales 

'Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

Wo pats wit be considered for giveaway. 



WE ACCEPT: jigcSSS! 



FIRST 
CHRISTMAS 

Appearing December 22! 

What a better way to celebrate Baby's 1st Christmas 
than with a photo greeting. Proud Parents and 
Grandparents alike will treasure this for years to come. 

Cost of the 1x2.5 photo ad is $20. Ads must be 
prepaid. Deadline is 12/18/95. Simply fill out the 
convenient form below and mail along with photo 
and payment to: 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St, 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

Attn: Lisa 



Child's Name:. 
Birthdate: 



From: 

(Parents or giver's name appear in ad) 

Address : ^_ 



Day Phone:, 
lb use your 
CC#: 



Home Phone: 



KZ^l 



BR SH 



Exp. Date:. 



Name: 

Signature: • 

Photos may be picked up after 1/5/96. 



j^.JA 






_^»*< , — .w y- l iar tJw 



- ■ ■■■-■-- 



CLASSIFIED UkElANd Newspapers Decemdek 15, 1995 




Uo Wors 

OttSs Jfoficfay Season 








• v. 









•* 



St. Patrick's 
Catholic Church 

15000 W. Wadsworth Rd., Wadsworth 

Mass Times: 

December 24, 5:00 & 7:00 PM 

December 25, 7, 8:30, 10 & 11:30 AM 

(708)244-4161 



Peace And Good .Will To All 



Crossroads Church 

(A church affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention) 
1190 Winchester Road • Libertyville • (708) 362-7120 



Christmas Musical • Sunday, December 17 



The Gift of Christmas 6:00 p.m. 

worshipping the Gift and the Giver 

presented by the Praise Choir 



Christmas Eve Services • Sunday, Dec. 24 1 



Morning Worship Service 10:30 a.m. 

Candlelight Lord's Supper Service 7:00 p.m. 

Please join us in celebrating our Savior's birth 







mwErtBt 






H&e *Sint6, 
0{f 6faiUt 




SUNDAY, DEC. 17 

CHILDREN'S CHRISTMAS PAGEANT 
LAKE ZURICH MIDDLE SCHOOL NORTH 9:30 A.M. 

CHRISTMAS EVE, DEC. 24 

WORSHIP SERVICE 9:30 AM 

FAMILY CANDLELIGHT SERVICE 7PM 

CANDLELIGHT SERVICE W/COMMUNION UPM 

St Peter United Church of Christ 

47 Church Street, Lake Zurich 
(708) 438-6441 
Dr. Stephen J. Redman. Sr. Pastor * Rev. Erla Fay Boyle, Assoc. Pastor g i 




A Savior 
'has 

been born 
He is 
Christ 

the Lord! 



CHAIN 
OF LAKES 

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH 

Advent Services 

Christmas Through 

Heaven's Eyes 

A Perspective That's 

Out of This World 

Sunday Morning: 8:15 and 10:45 

Nursery: 8:15,9:45 and 10:45; 

Sunday School: 9:45; 

Children's Church: 10:45 

Christmas Eve 
Candlelight Services 

December 24, 

6:00 PM and 9:00 PM 

Nursery for 6:00 PM service 

Teaching About 
Worship 

December 31, Sunday Morning 
Sunday schedule above 

2301 W. Grass Lake Rd. 
Antioch, II 






St. Paul 

Evangelical 

Lutheran Church 

For to us a child is bom, to us a son is given, and the government will 

be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, 

Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Is. 9;6 

Christmas Eve Services are: 

Regular Worship with Communion 9:00 AM 

Children's Service 7:00 PM 

Candlelight Service 10:30 PM 

Christmas Day 

Festival Service 9:00 AM 

420 N. Greenwood Dr. 

Round Lake Park, IL 60073 

Rev. Robert Meisclwitz, Pastor 

for information 546-4685 



THE GURNEE COMMUNITY CHURCH 

4555 W. GRAND AVE., GURNEE, IL- 336-2392 
DR. WM. GENDA, PASTOR 
JOSEPH M. WILCOX 
ASSOCIATE PASTOR 

December 17 

8:15 am Service 

10:00 am Service CONTATA 

10:00 am Sunday School 

December 24, Christmas Eve 

7:00 pm - Family Worship - 

Candlelight Service 
10:00 pm - Candlelight Service 

ALL ARE WELCOME 

(NURSERY PROVIDED) 




r 



Come And 

Behold Him, 

Born The King 

of Angels; 

O Come Let 

Us Adore Him!! 

December 24, Christmas Eve 

Service 7:00 P.M. 

Candlelight Holy Commtinlon ....11:00 P.M. 

Rev. Nathan P. Anderson 

The Lutheran Church of All Saints 

State Park Rd., 1/2 Mile North of Rte. 12 
Fox Lake, Illinois 

708-587-7727 



LUTHERAN 



. .-. 




(Missouri Synod) 

Sunday, December 17 4:00 p.m. 

A Special Children's Christmas Service 

Wednesday, December 20 6:30 p.m. 

Advent Service 

December 24 - Christmas Eve 

Sunday Worship 10:00 AM 
Candlelight Services 6:30 & 11:00 PM 

Monday, December 25 - Christmas Day 

10:00 a.m. 

5510 Grand Avenue 
Gurnee, IL 

(708) 244-9647 

Rev. Lee Clark, Pastor 



- 

'V 

■ 










CHURCH OF 

THE HOLY 

FAMILY 

EPISCOPAL 



Reverend Mollie Williams, Vicar 



26291 W. Uhman Blvd. (On Rt. £9, 1 Block S.of Rt 132) 
(708)356-7222 



Holy Eucharist Celebrating Advent IV 
Aim.. Pec. 24 



Choral Eucharist ....»«— 
(Sptctal Mutie MS p.mj 
Unn.. Dec. 25 
Holy Eucharist ..—..»«««•-»»— i l :^ 



*»■.•••.•«••«•••••««••••••«•*•♦* 



m.„«..»10 p.m. 



iwiwwt"*""***" 1 *' ****' 



.......v ri.ni. 







Presbytenan 
Church 

Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:30 AM 

Child Care Provided 

Sunday School 9:15 AM 

Christmas Eve 

Candlelight Services 

6*00 PM Children's Choirs 

9*00 PM ' lessons & Carols .- Adult Choir 

One block East of Rt. 45 on Sears Blvd. Wlldwood 

223-0073 

Kathy and Greg Bostrom, Pastors 





DtcfMbea 1 5, 1 9v5 UIceIancI Ndvspa P £rs CLASSIFIED [ Q 



Former Catholic?? 
■+■ Interested in 
1 Returning Home 
to the Catholic Church?? 

No matter how long you have been away for 
whatever reason, we invite you to join us for infor- 
mal sharing and an update of the Catholic Faithll 
We will listen to your doubts and.concernsll 

"Catholics Returning Home" 

6 ■ Week Series beginning 

Monday, January 8th, 7:30 PM 

St. Joseph Children's Chapel 

121 E. Maple Ave. 

Libertyville, IL 

Phone: Sally @ 662-5738 or 
St. Joseph's Adult Faith Office @ 362-7360 



CALVARY rTSPBOSBtmom 



CHURCH 






ImvWitlrUs 



St. Mark Lutheran Church 

1822 E.Grand Ave. 

Lindenhurst, IL 

Roger L. Pittman, Pastor 

(708)356-8140 

Doc. 17 

lAdvont Worship with Commur 
| Sunday School Program :. 

Dec. 24 

Advent Worship ..•■••• 

Candlelight Service . 

ChiStmL n™ Worship with Communion .....^^^^10-00^ 



• tk»* + + l **'* 



,...B:oba.m.& 11:00 a.m. 
3:00 p.m. 



ta.OO a.m. & 8:00 p.m. 



THE FEDERATED CHURCH s 
of Wauconda 

Rt. 176 & Barrington Rd. 
(708) 526-8471 
m>ri , Sunday, Dec. 24 

9 a.m. Church School 

10 a.m. Worship 

11 a m Fellowship 

7-30 p.m. Family Candlelight Communion Service 
11 :00 P.m. Candlelight Communion Service 



^^-Village Church of Gurnee 




Celebration Choir and Drama Team Presents: 

"Hallelujah, Christ Jesus is Bornl"\ 

Sunday, December 17th • 9:00 & 11:00 a.m. 



****** ****** 



****.********'*.* + **** 



.// 



Christmas Eve Day. 

"Christmas Worship' 

featuring narration from "God Came Near" by Max Lucado 

Sunday, December 24th • 10:00 a.m. or 5:30 p.m. 

Village Church of Gurnee r (708) 244-6606 

(1/4 mile south of Gumu Mills on Hunt Club Road) 



34500 Old McHenry Rd. 
Lake Zurich, IL 

(708) 438-7709 

December 20th 

Day School Child Service 7:00 PM 

The Living Creche 

December 24th, Christmas Eve 

Christmas Candlelight Services ....7:00 PM & 11:00 

December 25th, Christmas Day 

Christmas Day Service • 10:0 ° 

(Holy Communion) 

New Year's Day • 100 ° 




PM 
AM 
AM 



y 




St. 1?KANCIS de 
SALES CHURCH 

277 E. Main Street 
Lake Zurich, Illinois 60047 

CHRISDUS SCHEDULE 

-1995- 

ff ftPRAMENT ^FKF™)N™' TATION 

Sat., December 16 - Confessions 

H-.OOAM-Noon . 
Communal Penance 
Service - 7:30 PM 
Evening Prayer - 7:O0 PM 
followed by Confessions 



Mon„ December 18 
Wed., December 20 




CHBISIMA&5CHEDULE 

QU $ffiuChildren's Choir, Carols .begin ii 3:30 PM) 
- (2)4:15 PM (Children's Lilurgy Ministry) 
Gym & Old Church ,. 

12:00 Midnight (Music begins at 1 1:30 PM) 

r h ri NQ&CMM . 8:00 AM. 9:30 AM (Children's Liturgy of the Word) 
1 1:00 AM (Children's Ulurgy of the Word), 
12-30 PM (Children's Liturgy of the Word) 

IHKTKM- VFAM1I ' Y 

Sun Dec. 31 - 6:30 MIM'mI'mQAM. 11 :00 AM. 12:30 PM 

M&Y. THR M OTHFR OF y P fflByj'^' S MASSES 

Sunday, December 31 -5:00 PM 

Monday, January 1st -9:00 AM ONLY 



CELEBRATE. 

CHRISTMAS IN 

HISTORIC 

MILLBURN VILLAGE 

at 
Millbum Congregational 
United Church of Christ 

Grass Lake Road and Highway 45 

Kathleen Bleyaert, In-Care Student 

Karen S. Redman, Minister of ' 

Christian Education 

Paul R. Meltzer, Pastor 

December 17 - The Third Sunday of Advent 

8:30 a.m. - Morning Prayers and Sermon 

10:00 a.m. - Worship and Church School with Nursery Care 

December 24 - The Fourth Sunday of Advent 

8:30 a.m. - Morning Prayers and Sermon 

10:00 a.m. - Worship and Church School Christmas Program 

December 24 - Christmas Eve 

10:30 p.m. - Preservice Music 

11:00 p.m. - Festival Candlelight Eucharist 

December 31 - The First Sunday After Christmas 

8:30 a.m. - Morning Prayers and Sermon 
10:00 a.m. - Worship with Nursery Care 
NO Church School 

For further information call (708) 356-5237 




i 

WwudonothavB a church home for Christmas 
If you f° 9 ™™ v e s shar0 Christmas wrf/i us. . 
DEC 24 CHRISTMAS EVE MORNING 
SUNDAY SCHOOL AT BOTH SERVICES 

CHRISTMAS EVE NIGHT r0Q pM 

Junior Choir Singing • ■ ".-..9:00 PM 

Adult Choir Comala -. .,..11:00 PM 

Ch HOL?&fe 

DEC. 25 CHRISTMAS DAY AM 

Christmas Service •■••■"" 

REV. LISLE KAUFMAN 

(708)546-4444 

51 Cedar lalce ™ K"»"d l»^< P"" 015 



Long Grove 

Community 

Church 

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 
Robert Parker Coffin Road 

Christmas Eve Services 

Family Worship 9:30 AM & 11 :00 AM 
Nativity Pageant & Carols 

Infant Nursery Available (up to age 4) 
at Morning Services 

Candlelight Communion Services 
9:30 p.m. and 11:15 p.m. 

C708) 634-3635 

Dr. Craig P. Baldacci 
David Longstreet, Assoc. Minister 




^^..-.r.^... 



. . ,. - - 



Trinity United 
Lutheran Clmrch\^msg 

(e lca ) ipM? 

658 Grand Ave. JjMT 

Waukegan, It i«P 

(708)623-1197 

Rev. Dennis H. Kelly 

l Sunday, December 17 - Advent 

Worship •••• 8:00 a - m - 

Sunday School Pageant .....10:30 a.m. 

| Sunday, December 24 - Christmas Eve 

Advent IV Worship \ '""" 9 'i® * ,m / 

Xmas Eve Candlelight Services.... 10:30 p.m. 

i Monday, December 25 - Christmas Day 

Christmas Communion Service 9:30 a.m. 

I Sunday, January 1 - New Year's Day 

I Communion Service i • 9:30 s 

All Are Welcome! 




CLASSIFIED LaI«:Unc! Newspapers Dcccmder 15, 199 5 



i 

it 












LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' 37th ANNUAL 






&* 






« 




S;^ 3Sv ~-.l15 



J° il Jn<\ .... i\J 



From around the world, Christmas comes in many forms 



In Czechoslovakia, Christmas dinner Is fish, 
And the scales of the fish are put on a dish. 

Into everyone's wallet the fish scales will go. 
They might bring good luck and make money grow! 

The angel finds Poland when the first star appears. 
Then the feasting can start as Christmas Day nears. 

To begin Christmas dinner, everyone gets 
A special thin bread— even the pets. 

The children bring straw and wheat to the table 
To remind them that Jesus was born In a stable. 

Each window In Denmark Is aglow with a flame 
As Christmas Eve candles speak friendship's name; 

"All strangers are welcome In this home tonight. 
Come out of the darkness and Into the light." 

Dutch children are busy hunting for.toys. 
Poems contain clues for both girls and boys. 

Karl sees a cake hidden under a chair. 
He cuts the cake open and finds a gift there! 

To France she files next on her Christmas Eve search 
To watch bundled-up families hurry to church. 

And thenhome to their feasts, full of laughter and 
fun. 
They call this grand party the "Revelllon.' 

Then the children In France put their shoes by the fire 
And Pere Noel fills them when sleepy eyes tire. . 

The children of England their stockings have hung. 
Games they have played, carols they have sung. 



Cracker Barrel Christmas Sale % 

All Christmas Merchandise * 

25% Off ! 5 




Free gift wrapping % 

OPEN6AM-10PM SUN.-THURS. JJJJ 
m OW Country Stor* 6PM-11PM FRI.-SAT. J 

cftGumee • 1-94 and Grand Ave. • 708-244-1512 <$ 



Happy Holidays! 




134 DEALER SHOPPES IN 

28,000 SQUARE FEET 

Many Items Already On Sale Up to 25% Off 

Start Tour Holiday Shopping Sow 

Dealer Space Avaltahto 

Open 7 Days A Week Monday-Friday 1 1-7; Saturday & Sunday 10-S 

(708) 89S-8900 » 1170 W. Devon • Elk Grove Village 



Reindeer Puppet 



Here's what you do: 

1) Fold a piece of red paper in half for 
the bow. Make a pattern on the 
paper and cut it out. Open the bow 
and glue it in place. 

2) Now fold a piece of yellow or tan 
construction paper in 
half. Make a pattern 
onto it and cut it out. 
These arc the antlers. 
Open them up and glue 
them to the reindeer's 
head. 

3) Cut out two cars from brown con 
struction paper. Glue them beneath 
the antlers. 

4) Using crayons, draw in the eyes, eyebrows, and 
nose. Add the mouth, drawing it partly under the flap 
of the bag. 



t U BREWERY 




COLLECTIBLES 




Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 
1(708) 587-*242 




f^r/iMilMitf/aW^ 



Wads worth Barti Aquarium ^. <T 
•Saltwater Fish jd £ 
» •Freshwater Fish^^ 
' •Reefs & Corals «* 
15290 Rt 173 • Wadsworth 
Call 662-1060 Now Open - 



GIVE A GIFT OF LASTING MEMORY 
GIVE A TRIP THIS CHRISTMAS 

Travel Gift Certificates Available 

Bam Loft East Travel 

1333 Delany Road • Gurnee, Illinois 
(708) 249-4994 

Barn Loft North Travel 

277 Rte. 173 • Antioch, Illinois 

(708) 395-9050 



Beer Dghts Jfw •Mirrors 

Neons V -Steins 

Signs Sti -Tap Knobs 

& More! 

buy /sell /trade 

Great Gift Ideas For The Holidays 

708-265-8907 

dec. 24TH 9-3 LAKh V I LLA 



@m&i®n¥ ' 




For a very special 



Christmas give someone the 
WORLD with a travel gift 
certificate from f.fj 

37 East Grand Ave. ^Q^f^ 




Over 100 Crofters... 

For that unique 

holiday gift or special 

decoration choose from 

our thousands of 

handcrafted items. 

Come browse through our new Quilt Room 

Bed Quilts • Xmas Tree Skirts • Uighchair Covers 

• XMas Decorations • Xmas Stockings 

houdayhours 136 Center St 

M&T-Tli 1-8; _ - . „ rnnnn 

w,f ioam-6pm Grayslake, IL 60030 

Saturday 9am - 5pm MaCft ff/JO JJftZ 
Sunday 11am - 4pm \/vO) ytO-itAVJJ 

9 " " ^ 




[+'* 



Put a Subscription to 

Lakeland netDIRECT 

on YourUst This Season! 

• The perfect gift for new 
and current Internet users 

• Information education, and 
entertainment) E-Mail, and more! 

Visit us at: http^/www.lnd.com 
E-Mail us: service@lnd.com 

^DIRECT- 

Call for more information: 
(70S) 223-8199 



This year give 

the gift of a brighter future 

to your loved ones... 8 



Individual and Group Consulting witii a 
Human Resouce Professional: 

Career Search & Selection 

Personalityand Apptitudc Testing 

Writing Resumes with Impact 

Networking for the best Companies & Jobs 

Style & Image Consulting 

Professional Interviewing Techniques 

Salary Negotiation 

(708)838-6823 



37th Annual 
Gift Spotter 

Last Minute Ideas! 
Last Chance Next Week! 

Get your unique gift ideas 

in our Gilt Spotter and reach over 

200,000 potential customers. 

Call Your Classified 
Account Executive Today 

@ 708-223 -8161 



. 



DiccMbu 1 5, 1 995 WcEUNd NewspApcw CLASSIFIED 




i 



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115 



Lost & Found 



FOUND LITTLE FEMALE 
Pomeranian, Orango and 
Black In Iho WlWwood aroa, on 
11 /20/95, (708) S46-3&10. 

FOUND MANS HIGH 
SCHOOL RING In Osago 
Park, WauconcJa. Call Loo 
(015)305-5022. 

LOST LITTLE WHITE dog, 
6lbs„ In Round Lako Boach, 
12/7. Rowardl (708) 
546 J -2615 Piano. 

DID YOU FIND Somoonoa 
PET or Special LosJ Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dopl., and get 
your rosulls, FOUND ads 
are RUN FREE of Charge. 
• Call (708)223-8161. 



120 


Free 



125 


Personals 



20/20 -WITHOUT ^OLASSESl 

Sals, rapid. ^nonVfiufotcJaC 
permanent . restoration In 6-8 
weekr. . Airline pilot devel- 
oped. Doctor approved. Freo 
information by mall: 

1800)422-7320, e«. 393 
(406)961 -5S70. Tax 

(406)961-5577. SATISFAC- 
TION GUARANTEED. 

PLEASE HELP US ADOPT! 

Dear Blrthmolhen 

You can give Ihe precious gilt 

ol lite to a loving, but 

childless, 

husband and wtfo. We'll share 

sports, homework, picnics and 

hiking. And Sunday 

altemoons that are 

ported for biking. 

Medical, legal, counseling and 

court approved living 

expenses paid. 

Confidential. 

Pleaso fulfill our lifo long 

dream ol becoming a family 

by 

calling our attorney at: (708) 

957-6835. 



125 


Personals 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Information, 
please contact the Humano 
Sodaty., . ' 

FREE PICK-UP SERVICE. 

I will haul away your unwanted 
t row. boat, canoo,- outboard 

motors, or fishing goar FREE. 
. Call (708) 566-2819 aftor 

5:30pm. ^^^_ 

FREE VIDEO- Shows haw 
to double lite of your car or 
truck engine. Also get HON- 
EST 20% Increase In gas 
mileage, more power, and al- 
most eliminate emissions. 
HOT Item for reps. Call 
(706)548-7437. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A FREE 
or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at 
NO CHARGE! (We discour- 
age any pet ads). Deadlines: 
10am Wednesdays. (708) 
223-8161,0x1.140. 



ADOPTION-AN ACT OF 
LOVE. Loving family llkos 
sports, nature and Iho out- 
doors. Wo can provide a lov- 
ing homo, a good oducatlon 
and a llfollmo of happiness. 
Call colled Mike & Dlanno 
(708) 894-8806. 

ADOPTION: A CHOICE 
Caring, loving, active couple 
Happily married for ten years 
Only long for a child lo share 
Interests: camping, picnics, 
vacations, biking and hiking- 
College educated wllh ' 
a warm homo 
Eager to begin 
parenting together! 
If adoption Is your CHOICE, 
pleaso call Donna and Bob 
collect at 
(708) 358-3949. 

DIET 

MAGI CI! 

LOSE 

UP TO 

' 30 LBS. 

30 DAY PROGRAMS 

STARTING AT 

$30.00 
CALL TODAY! 
(708) 263-0334. 

FOR THE HOLIDAYS. Loso 
l0-40bs. by Christmas. All nat- 
ural and guaranteed. (708) 
487-2213, (800) 421-2213. 

WILL YOUR BABY 

BE CELEBRATING ITS' 

FIRST CHRISTMAS IN 

19957 

If so, see our bordered ad In 
the Classified section. 

What bottler way to show oft 
baby, and maybe make 
Grandma & Grandpa, or 

Aunts & Uncles proud too? 



130 


Auctions 



AUCTION 

1 VX70' MOBILE HOME 

Wed., I>«. 20,1 tiOO A.M. 

I SELLS TO HIGHEST BIDDER 

Lucatnt *l Lol fl9, Ralolww 
Uke Manor, 1WO0 128 th Slrcct 
(Su'le Line KJ.). BriiKit, Ul 
(Ajiproi. I Mile UV,i cf U.S 
ltlr. 43 OB'SlateJUna PJ.) 

t'/T9 Ilrt.U. SN-tB79."i n«lr.. V l 
II. lb. AC, w/Auachnl 40' 
Carjwrt & 12x28 Palio Cnttr 
anil 9a 10 Shed. Clean ami in 
joml ramlltiitn. 

TERMS: Swrceuftil bidder 
aiiut \»J 15000.00 In run or 
C a»V>rr j dwelt, ami the bat 
ance |,y perianal rbrck or raab 
■I liraeuf Auclitm. 

The hunt rnuit be removal 
from the ill e prior lo 2-15-96, or 
uurcbatcT mint pay $9.03 per 
■lay iior«(.r. .liupeclian of 
moliiir bone on Tuenlay, Dee 
19, 1:00 I'M in 3: W) PM only. 

Conltin Static, Auctioneer, 
I lu rill ry, IL. 70B/426- 1S13. 



140 


Financial 



$* CASHS3 Immediato $5 
for structured settlements, 
annuities, lottery payouts, 
insurance clalmt and mort- 
OJQos. 1 •800-386-3582 

J.G.Wentworth, the nations 
only direct purchaser. 




,:•:■:•:■ 3 
;•:■:. <-:■:•> 



i-;w;<7^;->>>: , ;'>:*:->/rtv.%'Sva*xw\svsvt* 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



Rpisnssnsis^ 



unssnsssnisss^^^^^^^^^ 



gs 



Hostess 

Hostess needed for New Homes Sales Office. 

Part time position. 

Call Julie - Wednesday-Sunday 

(708)816-3600 



Part Time 

INSIDE SALES 

Lakeland Newspapers, Lake County's fastest-growing 
group of weekly newspapers Is currently expanding 
our Sales Dept. and we are seeking qualified candi- 
dates for part time telemarketing. We offer flexible day 
or evening hours, salary plus commission and a 
pleasant working environment. An excellent opportu- 
nity for students, seniors or mothers. For more infor- 
mation contact: . " 

Karen O'Toole at 

(708) 223-8161 

EOE 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



lldp Wanted 
Part-Time 



Retail Sales 

The Easy Spirit In Vernon 
Hills has an opening for a 
PT Sales Assoc. Earn $7 to 
$9 per hour. Sal. + com- 
mission. Flex schedule, 
days or eves. 

Call 

708-816-0158 

EOE 



r 



Clerical 

•Medical* 

Tronscriptionist 

(Part-Time) 

3:30-9pm 

Midwestern Regional Medical 
Center lias an opportunity for 
on experienced medical irnn 
scrlptlonlst with hospital expe- 
rience preferred. 

This position requires excel' 
lent communication /Interper- 
sonal skills with the ability to 
handle a multitude of respon- 
sibilities with attention to 
detail. 

We offer an excellent compen- 
sation and benefits package 
Including medlcal/dental/llfe, 
paid vacations/holidays, 

401[k). and morel For consld 
eratlon, fax/send resume or 
apply In person: 

Susan Thomas 

Human Resources 

2501 Emma us Avenue 

Zton, IL 60099 ' 

FAX: 708-872-6222 

. Midwestern 

Regional 
Medical Center 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



GLEANING 
PERSON 

Days. Possibly full time. 
Conscientious. Must havej 
car for corporate furnished J 
apartments. Hotel expert-' 
ence helpful. Waukcgan. 

LCall 
(708)473-2246 
n an i — — i 

|OorcAl \ 

EVENING CLERK 

Student Services Center 
Lakeshore Cam put 

Coilogo ot Lako County seeks a 
part-timo dark to sorvo as a rocep- 
llonlsl, provldos support to the 
counseling staff and center, and 
assists with registration lor place- 
ment and testing. 

QUALIFICATIONS: Requires a hkjh 
school cSptoma or oqurvatoril(Gf£C), 
a minimum of one year previous 
office experience and typing skills ol 
40 wpm. The applicant must have 
the ability to work independently 
and must be extremely reliable. 
Excellent communication and orga- 
nizational skins are essential, as 
wed as Bto ability to read, write and 
speak Spanish. This position 
requires a high degree of public 
contact 

A" COMPLETED APPLICATION 
and a required typing test must be 
submitted to Personnel. Typing 
tests are given by appointmenl 
only. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION, 
please contact Personnel at (708) 
223-6601, extension 2216. For the 
hearing Impaired, the TDD number 
13(700)223-5615. 
COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY, 
19351 W. Washington, Graystake, 
IL 60030-1196. AtflrmarJvo action/ 
equal opportunity employer 
mAVd/v. 



LAUNDROMAT ATTENDANT 



We 



need responsible, mature persons to handle 
a variety of duties serving our customers in a 
clean, modem facility. Part time weekends a 
must! Other hours also available. You must' 
enjoy working with people and present a neat \ 
appearance. Good pay and working conditions. 
This is a permanent part-time position 

Dry-Dock Laundromat 

509 Washington St. • Ingleside 
(705)507-5445 



Budgefel. 

Now hiring for the following position: 

FRONT DESK CLERK 

PART-TIME 

Varied Shifts. Includes Weekends. 
Some Computer knowledge helpful. 

The Budgetel Inn 

5688 N. Ridge Road, Gurnee, IL 

Off I-94& Grand Ave. - 
between S honey's & Cracker Barrel 

(708)662-7600 



PART-TIME 
CAREERS 

If you are at least 26 and have 
not reached your 37th birthday you 

could qualify for a career in the 
NAVAL RESERVE. Benefits include: 

Tension Opportunities 
•Discount Shopping Privileges 
'Paid Training 
'Educational Benefits 
'Free Uniforms 
'One Weekend a Month 
Two Weeks per Year 
'NO BOOT CAMP 

This is an excellent opportunity for you 
to put your civilian experience to work. 

For more information: 
"ZT Rich Hoffman 




NAVAL RESERVE 




Help Wanted 
Part-Tfane 



•AVON' REPRESENTA- 
TIVE NEEDEDI NO DOOR- 
TO-DOOR REQUIRED. 

$100-51,200+ Monthly. 

Ind/Salos/Rop, 1-800-236- 
0041. 



GENERAL OFFICE/ 
DATA ENTRY 

for small C.P.A. firm 

in Vernon Hills, 
flexible 15 hrsAvk. 

(708) 549 7007 



KITCHEN AID 
& DRIVER 

in Round Lake 

5 Days a Week 

8AM - Noon 

Driver's license 

& insurance a must! 

MEALS on 
WHEELS 

Call Len: 

708-546-5733 



WANTED 
PLAYGROUND 

SUPERVISORS 

Immediate 
Employment Available 
For lunch time supervision 
in the Fox Lake Grade 
Schools. Interested appli- 
cants should contact any 
of the Fox Lake District 
114 schools or phone 587- 
8275. 

Apply Now 






BANK TELLER 



Libertyville bank seeks part 
time bank teller (25-30 hrsAvk), 
Some Saturday work req 
Prefer prior teller exper. or cu si. 
serv. bkgrd. Skill in cash bdlg., 

bil. cash drawer, friendly per- 
sonality A. wimnpieaa to team 
essential. 

Call Anytime to comp lete 

an automated telephone 

a pplication : 

(708) 549-5831 Ext 503 




Housekeeoer 



Full & Part Time 

Contact 
Gail Becker 



(708) 438-5050 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted . 

Full-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 

Fnll-Time 



DRIVERS/OTR...M.00Q algn- 
on bonut, new conventional 
equipment, great benefit*. 
lease program. Earn up to 29 
cent* per mile. Student* 
welcome! Cal-A»tc Interna- 
tional. 800-950-TEAM. 800- 
880-1030. 

Drivott/COAST TO COAST: 
Free Training, a guaranteed 
job, and the beat pay In the 
Induatry! Call 1-800-597- 
CRST. 

TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED to 
operate 48 atate*. No Can- 
ada. Haul Dry freight. No Haz- 
Mat. Excellent Pay & Bene- 
fita. Minimum 1 y OTR. Ex- 
perience call Continental 
Expret* 1-800-695-4473. 



DRIVERS - Solo & Teams 
42.000.00 Sign On.Top 
Teams Earn tl 03.000 + , 
Major Benefits/Motel & Dead- 
head Pay. Driving School 
Grads Welcome. Covenant 
Transport 800-441-4394. 

Students Call 800-338-6428. 

HAROLD ivis TRUCKING 
hiring drivers. Free Driver 
Training. ..If you qualify. Stu- 
dents welcome. Experience 
pay up lo 28 cents per mile. 
Excellent benefits; 1-800- 
842-0853. 

DRIVERS Home Weekly, no 
EastAVest Coast. Looking tor 
a company that give you 
respect as a. professional? 
Then call Fox Midwest Trans- 
port.' 800-333-2268. 

ATTN: EXPERIENCED 'TRUCK 
DRIVERS DRIVE TO OWNII 
SO Down/78<r ALL MILES. 
Ownership possible in 18 
months. Avg. 10,000 + 

miles/month. Company Driv- 
ers: ; NEWER EQUIPMENT. 
Competitive Pay/Benefits. 

Call: NEW APPLE LINES 1- 
800-343-8303 or 1-800-843- 
3384 Madison, SD Mon-Fri 
8-5PM Central, CALLIIIIH 



mm/m\ 

Need a Handy Man 
to work In 3 group 
homes in the Lake 
County area. Must 
have own tools. 
15/20 hours of work 
a week. Salary 
comm. with experi- 
ence. 

Please apply at 

860 South Lewis 
Waukegan 



Driver* - OTR ADS • 1,000 
Sign-On Bonus Limited open- 
ings for experienced flatbed 
drivers. Assigned conven- 
tlonals, benefits, 401k. and 
more. Call today) 800-646- 
3438, Ext. 1005. Owner 
Operators Welcome. 

Drivers. ..Wo Pay For Experi- 
ence! Great bonuses, top 
benefits, excellent get-home 
and time-off policy plus paid 
flatbed training! Min 23, 1 
year recent OTR experience. 
Melton Truck Lines, Inc. 
800-635-8669. M/F/EOE 

DRIVERS -Start w/top pay for 
.solo & teams; add pay for 
experience, 3 raises In 1st 
year, excellent benefits, bo- 
nuses, profit sharing, direct 
deposit, assigned equip, you 
take home and if you're a 
grad or 22 w/1yr. OTR/CDL 
*A" You'vo got ttl 1-800- 
633-0550 Ext. 1-2. 

DRIVERS/OWNER OPERA- 
TORS with CDL-A and Hat- 
mat, ATS wants you! Enjoy 
top pay/boneliti, high miles 
and much more. 

Call ANDERSON TRUCKING 
SERVICE at 1-800-241-B787. 
EOE. 



Swift Transportation now 
hiring exp and inexp'd driver*. 
Orlvina school orads are also. 
'invited to apply. Training 
available, good pay. complete 
benefits, home more often. 
For information 1-800-284- 
8785 (eoe-m/f min 23 yrs) 



The Village of Antioch 
will be accepting applica- 
tions for employment in 
the Building Department 
for a building and electri- 
cal inspector position.' 
Minimum qualifications 
include: high school 
diploma; current driver's 
license and an excellent 
driving record; eight 
years related work expe- 
rience; good verbal and 
written skills. Applicant 
should be BOCA certified 
or be able to achieve cer- 
tification within two 
years. An Illinois munici- 
pal registration as an 
electrician is preferred. 
Applications can be 
obtained or resume can 
be mailed to the Village 
Hall, 874 Main Street, 
Antioch, IL 60002, Attn: 
Mr. Timothy Wells, 
Village Administrator. 
Applications and 

resumes must be 
returned by December 
22, 1995 at 5:00 P.M. at the 
Village HalL The Village 
reserves the right to reject 
any application. The 
Village of Antioch is an 
Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search. 

By Nancy Sakol 

Q: Dear... Search: After 18 years, my position is about to be elimi- 
nated because of restructuring, I have saved religiously over this 
lime and have accumulated a sizeable savings. I would like to take a 
year off and travel before attempting to find another job. Would this 
bun me on the resume and be a negative in ihe future? I am current- 
ly 45. G.K. - Palatine. 

A: Dear G.K. Your letter addresses a good question; however, in for- 
mation was lacking thai could belter help me guide you. First off, you 
did not mention if you were a sole income or a second income in your 
household. You are asking basically what, if any, ramincadons there 
would be. Without knowing what if any responsibilities you current- 
ly hold as a financial support factor to others, it is bard lo see the big 
picture. Lei us assume that you are on your own. If one works as hard 
at you have on the same position all these years and has been fortu- 
nate enough to reap the benefits o f sa v in g up c nou g h to be able to take 
a year off for the sole purpose of enjoying lifc.go for it Will it hurt 
your resume? Probably not. Will it be noticed that you have one-year 
employment gap? Probably so. When explaining your story lo a 
potential employer of how you took off for a year, it may or may not 
be accepted by everyone. People may react different than you would 
expect. Some may view you as a free and easy spiriL And while there 
may be nothing wrong with that, the conservative corporation {for 
example) may find fault with it; the small business owner may look 
upon it as strange; ihe big corporate hiring authority may seriously 
question where you've really been. 1 believe everyone at some time 
wishes that they could take off for a year without any employment 
concerns. Whether or not it is accepted depends upon tbe individual 
judging the situation. If the company you have recently left deemed 
your icrmirtation a "lay-off* and you intend lo collect unemployment 
compensation from state, keep in mind that unemployment compen- 
sation is mil "vacation pay" and therefore if caught, is a direct fraud 
being committed. The department of unemployment security does at 
random checks to verify If the recipient is actually seeking other 
employment during that lime they are receiving the compensation. 
One other thing thai I would like to point out is (bat without knowing 
what type of salary you were making in this position, I will advise 
that when an individual has been with a company as long as you have 
been, you may have reached a peak in salary through merit raises and 
reviews, that has priced you out of the market for the type of work 
you do. For instance, a secretary who has devoted 18 years to a cor- 
poration and received a $40,000 a year salary upon leaving, may only 
find the market lo be offering salaries in the range of 524-526,000 per 
year. Be prepared to lake this into consideration if you plan on not 
being flexible with your salary upon your return. You may find your- 
self unemployed longer than you are anticipating. After 18 yean with 
the same company hopefully you were offered some sort or severance 
package. Send me a postcard & enjoy I Good Luck I 
Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior Personnel in Gumec. 
Letters can be sent to Nancy at 4949 Grand Ave., 
QumeclL 60031. 




CLASSIFIED Ukclnntl NcwspApEK Dtctmben IS, 1995 



5 

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V 
if 







220 



Hctp Wanted 
Full-Ttme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DENTAL 
ASSISTANT 

Office Receptionist 

New Office In Ukc Zurich 

Will Train 

(708) 776-7143 



m 



DRIVER 

Contract carrier is 
looking for experi- 
enced OTR Driver to 
run 800-mile radius 
of Chicago. Late- 
model conv. freight 
liners, 40 IK, Health 
plan, .285 per mile. 

Call 

(708) 934-9313 

Ask for Kurt 



Manulacturlng 

PAINTERS, M0LDERS: 
FORGET ABOUT WINTERS & 
JOIN US IN SOUTH CAR0UNAI1 
ALLIBERT-INOAC, a Joint vonturo 
company near GrwnviBQ, SC, pn> 
duces automotive Interior prod 
ucls, Instrument panels, consolos 
door panels, trim, ate. Wo'ro 
dynamic, last paced 4 globally net- 
worked manufacturer rapidly 
expanding w/a now 120,000 sq. fL 
(aclllty offering ground floor oppor 
tunltios lor PRODUCTION MAN 
AQERS. Soasoned professionals 
for these positions should have 
exp. In product 1 i, problem sort- 
ing, particularly .-Jnttng lo procoss, 
strong mechanlcaJ with oxc. com- 
munication skDIs. Mechanical or 
Industrial engineering degree a 
roal plus. Opportunities Include: 
•PAJNT1HO. MOR lor plastic com- 
ponents In an automated pacod 
environment. Exp. with plural com- 
ponent mixing systems utilizing 
convontional/HVLP oquipment Is a 
plus. 'INJECTION MOLDING 
MOR forpresses ranging from 750 
to 2100 tons. Exp. In gas assist, 
quick change systems 4 robotics a 
plus. Qreal sal./bons pkg, DOE, 
with relocation pkg avail. Mall or 
Fax resume to: H.R. Mgr, ALLIB- 
ERT INOAC, Box 900, Fountain 
Inn. SC 29644. Fax: 803/862- 
7700. EOE M/TW/H. 



rt WAREHOUSE n 

New store opening in 

Mundeloin, Warehouse 

personnel wanted. 

Experience n ptus. Day A 

night shift. Contact Tbnry at 

^ (708)566-3200 . 



NOW OPEN IN GURNEE 

■ job PiJcorrwni As^siance 

■ Pa/ Tuifton fiom Earnings 
*' ■ Day or Evening Classes 

■ 4 Locations '■ Est.-in'1S6S ; 
•Professional Bartenders Sehl. 

CALL'312-B-A-R-T-E-N-D 



P? 



LEASING AGENT/ 
GENERAL OFFICE 



For North Suburban 

Apart rnonl Community It 

woklng a qualified looting 

agent. Must work tons *•«*• 

ond»- Strong customer servict, 

communication tt computer 

■killi required. Full-Time with 

benefits. Send or lax roiumo 

to: Donna Nllson. Controller, 

Ludwirjr and Company, 4081 

Ryan Road, Gumee, IL 60031. 

(708? 263-6231. jl 




The Prudential 

is seeking bright & aner 
getic people for a career 
In insurance and financial 
services. We offer full 
training, excellent bene- 
fits and 1st year earning 
potential or $40,000. 
Contact Terry at (708) 
680-8734 ex. 302. 



[ 



ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 

Establish new and maintain existing accounts 

Inside position offers salary + comm. 

244*0016 



pcrior JCersonncl 



I 



INSIDE SALES 
REPRESENTATIVE 

Wo arc looking lor an enthusiastic and motivated person 
who enjoys the challenge of establishing a customer base 
and Increasing sales in a relatively new market. This product 
line consists of security envelopes for handling cash, valu- 
ables, and confidential documents. 

Please forward your resume to: 

Les Laske 

fyflCCh products, inc. 

201 Park Ave. 708-356-2323 Lake Villa, IL 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



I 



RECEPTIONIST 

At Danaher Controls, wc think first impressions count... 
Danahcr Controls is an extraordinary company and we're 
looking for an extraordinary person to be our receptionist. 
The successful candidate will have good voice quality, a 
professional appearance and a great attitude. 
In addition to telephone and lobby greetings, this impor- 
tant position is responsible for mail distribution and other 
clerical work. 

We olTer an excellent starting salary, medical, dental, and 
401K benefits. 
Reply in confidence to: 

Danahcr Controls 

1675 Delany Road 
Gurnee, Illinois 60031 



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( lll^ LOOKING FOR A 
FEW GOOD MEN AND WOMEN!! 
TOOL & DIE MAKER/REPAIR 
NIGHTS 

Experienced in building, trouble-shooting and 
maintaining progressive punch-press dies. 

Hours: 4:30 p.m. - 3 a.m. Mon. thruThurs. 
Send Resume ATT: Wayne Stolarik 

11600 STERLING PARKWAY 

BOX 469, RICHMOND, IL 60071-0469 

PHONE 815-678-2031 

Located on Sterling Parkway Off Hwy. H 
Just 1 Block Southeast of Genoa City, Wl 



The NEW Holiday Inn Mundddfl, now managed by 

Metro Hotels, Inc. Is looking for qualified individuals 

for the following positions: 

-SALES MANAGER 
-WA1TSTAFF 

-BANQUET SET UP PERSON 
-FRONT DESK MANAGER 
-ACCOUNTING CLERK 
If you are a hospitality professional and are as excited 
about the future of the Holiday Inn Mundclein as wc arc, 
please apply in person daily between 9-5- 



H 
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- 

The Holiday Inn Mundelein : 

510 East Route 83 



510 East Route 83 
or Fax Resume (708) 949-0117 




Marketing 

Because of an internal promotion, Danaher Controls is 
looking for a 

Marketing Assistant 

Responsibilities are widely varied and include production 
and distribution of Marketing Newsletters, maintenance of 
distributor database and files and planning meetings. 

The successful candidate will have a college degree, per 
sonal computer proficiency including database experience 
and desktop publishing (Pagemakcr) and a great attitude. 

Wc offer an excellent starting salary, medical, dental, and 
40 IK benefits. 

Reply in confidence to: 

Danaher Controls 

1675 Delany Road 

Gurnee, Illinois 60031 



CHRISTMAS CALL NOW, 

AND WORK 
IN JANUARY 
TO PAY THOSE 
BILLS THAT 
WILL ARRIVE! 

•$6.50 to $7.Q0lhr. to start 
' No experience necessary ' 
B 1 1_ L S * Paid training 

•Medical benefits available 

Year round, hourly inventory taker 
positions available. Call nowl 



Call Far An Interrwtv TOfl-662-9277 
or 7im-iiZ;i-Hf>A(> ttftvr, l p.m. • 





INVENTORY 
SPECIALISTS 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 



mmmm^<mm 



ADVERTISING SALES 

Lakeland Newspapers, Lake County's largest weekly 
newspaper group, Is seeking an Advertising Account 
Executive. The candidate will be responsible for field 
sales calls, developing a key area in Lake County 
and must possess excellent skills in Interpersonal 
communication, creativity and personal responsibility. 
The candidate must also be self motivated and able 
to work with minimal amount of supervision, enjoy 
variety and be abfe to hande multiple tasks. An auto- 
mobile Is necessary (gas compensation will be 
made.) If you are professional, energetic and pos- 
sess al of the above characteristics we are interest- 
ed in talking to you. A candidate should have previ- 
ous sales experience. Please send resume or call: . 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8161 



J 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Timc 



fpROPERTY^ 
MANAGER 

Professional manage- 
ment company seeks a 
career-oriented Individ- 
ual with apartment 
rental experience for far 
NW Suburbs. Complete 
benefits & opportunity 
to advance. Fax resume 
to lane 
,(708) 2I8-4928J 



H&R Block 

Receptionist 
Client Service Reps 

FT tax season or PT ovo9 & 
wknds. tax season. 
Assignments available In 
Waukogan, Zon, Mundeleln 
& High wood. 

We will train you in all pro- 
cedures starting at $5.75 
perhr. 

Apply In person M-F 

9am~5pm 

Apply at 

H&R Block Tax 

Service, Inc. 

746 Green Bay Rd. 
Waukegan, IL 

EOE IWF/D7V 



Warehouse 

COMB GROW 
WITH US... 

Cole-Parmer, a worldwide dis- 
tributor of scientific Initru- 
menu, Is seeking Individuals for 
a variety of opportunities witlUn 
our growing Distribution Center. 
If you want to be a part of our 
energetic learn, consider Uw fol- 
lowing opportunities: 

DC SPECIALIST 

Experience with slock receipt/ 
pulawny, order filing or packing 
desirable. Strong attention to 
detail and high energy level nec- 
essary. 

DC SUPERVISOR 

Previous DC experience Impor- 
tant Proven communication and 
team building skills along with a 
strong customer orientation are 

essential. 

We offer full/part-time positions 
as well as flexible schedules, and 
the opportunity lo sharpen your 
skills with an Industry leader. 
Exceltenl salary and benefits 
package available. 

Send your resume Indicating 
salary history and position of 
Interest to: 

Cole- Parmer 
Instrument Company 

Human Resources 

625 E. Bunker Court 

Vernon Hills. IL 60061 




Parmer 



An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
Full-Time 



ACCOUNTING ASS'T 

A/R, A/P & More. 

Solomon a plus. 

X44-O016 



pcrior JCersonncl 



] 



TRAVEL AGENT 

I Fast Growing Agency specializing in Cruises and all-inclusive 
Vacation! seeks a full time inside Travel Consultant. Prefer 
(Experience in Leisure Travel Sales. Will. Consider recent Travel 
[School Graduate wlth'prior sales experience. We offer an excellent 
I compensation plan. Fully paid health insurance, paid holidays, vaca- 
tion and sick days. A friendly non-smoking office. . 

Fax Resume to 708-356-3151 
or Mall to P.O. Box 549, Lake Villa, IL 60046 



TjmberKidge 

I*lTR8lnO a REHABILITATION CENTER 

As a premier 1 50-bed center ol rehab care 
excellence. Timber Ridge Nursing and Rehabilitation 
Center oilers the most advanced sub-acute 
technology in the warmest homelike selling. As we 
continue to grow In both services and patient base, 
we Invite you to join us as: 

REHAB DEPARTMENT 
'DIRECTOR OFPT- Futt-Hme. experience 
preferred. Rotating weekends. 
• SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST • Full- 
time, experience preferred. 

We offer an excellent compensation package and 

supportive work environment. Please apply In person 

or send your resume lo: Rehab Coordinator, 

TlmberRldgo Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, 

9848 SWllOlhSt., Ocala, FL 344B1. 

(904)854-8200 

Equal Opportunity Employer' 



Looking to Hire? 
Turn To... 






& <fi 






m 



♦:♦?♦-. 






Lakeland 

[Newspapers 
CLASSIFIEDS 



*>< 



Call Your Classified 



♦ 



W 



Account Representative at 

(708) 223-8161 or 

Fax (708) 223-8810 



•DIE SETTERS 

This is an opportunity for qualified & experienced people to 
work full time for a progressive company. A good work record is 
required. We provide a competitive salary and benefits. 

Call the Personnel Dept. 708/438-4600 or apply in person. 



CM. Products, Inc. 

800 Ela Road 
Lake Zurich. Illinois 60047 




CUSTOMER SERVICE REP 

Immediate opening for experienced Cust Svc Rep for busy sales 
dept. Applicant should have pleasant phone manner and abili- 
ty to prioritize work. Skills: MS Word or WordPerfect and mini- 
mum of 1 year cust svc exp. 

Salary history required for consideration. Send resume to: 



CM. Products, Inc. 

800 Ela Road 
Lake Zurich, Illinois 60047 




• 









DccEMbcit 15, 1995 UkdANci Newspapers CLASSIFIED 





■i%$& 



220 



Hdp Wanted 

Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Ful!-TLme 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Tim? 



220 



Help Wanted 
Rill-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-TLmc 



HAPPY HOLIDAYS FHOM 
MAVERICK TRANSPORTA- 
TIONI Wa wlih you and your 
family a taio and happy holi- 
day aoaton. Must bo 24. 1 
yr, OTR. EOE, 1.800-289- 
1100. 

Driver. ..Bulk* Linos, Inc. |i 
expanding it* total operation, 
AILjConventional (loot, no allp 
■oMlng, ■atallite communica- 
tion, bonui program & Now 
Rearer *0rvlilon. , 800-TO- 
BUSKE 

JTI, INC. Wanta OTR drivora. 
Compotitivo wage*. late 
model equipment, health 
insurance, retirement plan. 
Benefits: Bonui, mileage, 
safety. Vacation pay. Rider 
program. 1*800-331-7746, 
Lincoln, Nebraska. 

OTR TRACTOR/Traller 

van/flatbed driven wanted for 
dedicated regional operations 
covering Indiana, Ohio, 
Michigan and Illinois, For 

| more Information, contact 
Werner Enterprises. 1-800- 

[346-2816 

[DALLAS & MAVIS a major 
flatbed carrier needs experi- 
enced drivers for our new 
smpany trucks. Home of- 
an, excellent benefits and 
roated with rospect. 1-000- 
18-2424. 



rarehouse/Shipplng 

Outstanding 

Warehouse 

jOpportuni ties 1 1 ! 

At Barnant Company, a 
laboratory products man 
ufacturer in Birrtngton, 
we ofTer profit sharing, 
tuition reimbursement, 
and advancement oppor- 
tunities. We are currently 
seeking Individuals for the 
following position: 

•Warehouse Clerk* 

You will receive ehlp- 
™w«. ™t stock away, 
and pull work orders for 
production. Some heavy 
lifting Involved. Some pre 
vlous experience and a 
stable work history 
absolutely required. 

As a mid-sized, growing 
company we offer a great 
work environment with an 
excellent benefits paclcage. 
Please call 708-842-2300 
28W092 Commercial Ave., 
Barrlngton. IL 60010. 
EOE 

BARNANT 
COMPANY 



f Direct I 
e Care a 

S Direct Care Workers for 
g MR/DD woman In resl- 

B B dentlal sfltiing. Full or Part 
time Is available. Primarily 
Bj afternoons, evenings, and 
a weekends. Wa are com- 
i mitted to quality residential 
jjcare. II Interested please 
call Gall Becker. 



(708)438-5050 

Mount 
| St* Joseph g 

S Lake Zurich 




2223 



AIDES 

Part Time and 

Full Time for 

MR/DD Women in 

Residential Setting, 

Weekend nights 

are a must. 

Contact Gail Becker 

| (708) 438-5050 

MOUNT 
ST. JOSEPH 

Lake Zurich 

HBmBMfflBBBI 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



Desperately seeking: 

2 Midline Opcrainn for permanent 
poiitiotu with i (real company. 
Machining experience (it lent 6 
mom hi) and a desire to learn 
required. Apply it Weitern SlafT 
Servicer 134 Center Street, 
Grayilake, IL Mon-Fri 9 *.m. lo 4 
P-m- 



MACHINERY 
DETAIIERS 

Wheeling Area 

Pay commmn urate wllh experi- 
ence, No experience required 
Call Mark Speck for art interview, 

(708) 537-7700 



General Office 

Organized person. Good with 
figures, WP and computer 
tkilU a mutt. Non-rmaking 
ialci office In Mundelcin. 

(708)949-8070 



MARKl-TTING 
RESEARCH ASSISTANT 1 

Growing Lake Villa rum li En 
need of a reiearch auiiiarrt. Mutt I 
have a working knowledge of | 
I Micrcxoft Wcrd. 

Please call 
(708) 356-9441 



PLASTICS 

TREND PLASTICS II, INC. 

ROUND LAKE, II 
MACHINE MAINTENANCE 

Full or part lime. Experience 
with injection molding prates 
required. 

SET-UPVSTART-UP 
Pull time. Experience wllh 
broad size range of prcsies 
required. 

Call 708-546-4611 



ACCOUNTING 

Tax experience a plus but not 
necessary. We will train. Good 
customer service skills. 
Blllngual/Spanith preferred. 

(708) 358-1040 



EHSHHHHOHCHSOHHCI 

g INSTALLER jj 

O Experienced siding rj 

c Installer. Year-round work, a 

D Start Immediately. 3 

Contact Krtetie, ' 

g (708)317-9363 g 

gggggggggggyggyej 



ASSEMBLE PRODUCTS 
ft CRAFTS a HOME 

Good wekry Income. For wluabte 

free Information package send oeif- 

addreMed ffUrnped envelope to 

GSECO 

RO Box 7521 

Lllwrtyvllle. IL 60045-7521 



i Parts' 
Counterperson 

Ford parts knowledge 
required. VCS computer 
system knowledge a plus, 
but will train. For addi- 
tional Information contact 

Kelly or Karen 
708-395-3900 



High School 
Snack Person 

Great hours. No 
weekends or nights. 
To begin after 1-3-96 

Call 

336-7551 

after 3pm 

Ask for Karen 



is: 



CLERK 

ModfcaJ suppry company Is looting 
lor a lulijart lino dork to do genor- 
el office wax dulies lo IrriurJa (ing. 
data ortry and soma somd tnool 
work. Opportunfy lor advanoomort. 
RonWo hours and smofcatrooerM- 
ronmoni. Fai or send roiumo lo: 

Medikmark Co. 

900 Asbury Dr. 
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

(708) 537-8703 



U 



000 
0000-00 



Residential Delivery, 
Small car and Insur- 
ance necessary. Start 
Immediately. 

MUNDELEIN 

1708) 949-9240 

Ask for "Kastr 



FINANCE 

Immediate Openings 

COLLECTORS & 
LOAN PROCESSORS 

Gumec-based Eagle Finance 

is seeking collectors & loan 

processors for our fast paced 

automobile finance corp 

Complete training provided. 

Call Anytime to complete 

an automat ed telephone 

a pplication : 

(708) 549-5831 Ext 537 



ITEACHER 

Sealed for Christian Prc-Schooll 
In Gumec. FT/good benefils.1 
Min. requirements 6 hrs. ofl 
Early Childhood Drak)procrrt| 
or related field. 
Please call Robin or Sbara | 

360-9042 






TELEMARKETING 

Last Minute . 

Christmas Cash 

Jingling In Your 

Pocket. Daily Pay. 

No experience 

necessary. Start today. 

Full or Part time. 
Up to JSOO per week- 

Mundefeln £ 
[7081 949-9240 6 

ask for Santo "Kash* 



E2S2 



CNA's and 

Homemaker Companions 

Home-Care 

Hourly and Live-in 

Enjoy a satisfying, rewarding 

job! Assist older adults (c 

receive excellent benefits, 

training, flexible hours, 

competitive wages. 

Call 800/555-5657 

LifeStyle Options, Inc. 



Mana go moot 

Career Opportunities 

with ono of do nation's ropldy 
growing book retailers. Wa are 
soaking: 

'Regional Managers 
'District Managers 
'Distribution Managers; 
'Operations ' 

Positions are loe'd within the 
Southeast A we offer competitive 
compensation Incl'dg 40 t(k) & 
Stock Purchase plans. For prompt 
consideration, call the Director ol 
Human Resources at (800) 239- 
2665 or sand resume to: 

BOOKS-A-MILLION, INC. 

Director of Human Resource* 

P.O. Dox19768 

Birmingham, AL 35219 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



Security Cffcwl 

** IMMEDIATE OPENINGS** 

up to saso/HR. 

0UARD8MARK IMC r«S posmons tor 

Security OSIeerc 4 Shift Supervttor* h 
UbertyvlBe & surrounding artts. 
A^pCcants must be IWjubie to work any 
shirt, be at but 21 yean old, hew 
dependibl* trantporuiion and naal 



•f ™« ang*» Conregt Heaiai Imuranc* 

"iOIKAv liable 
•And MUCH MORE... 

If you're Inteimud In woriUny for Via 
country's laading sacurtry rirm. appty In 
person tins.. Wed. 4 Tnurs. from 9an> 
5pm at Quanssmark, 1SM 8. 
Mlhnukie An, Suite SOS, 
Lto*rV»IUe.PH: 706-381 -M1 8. E-C€ 

•*•••••••*•* 



^SNOW.f 
PLOWS 

Wanted Drivers, 
^ . Shovelers, "* 
Personal Trucks 
Not Necessary, 
Excellent Pay- i£ 

& CaU . # 

(708) 304-6773 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed class Iflcd 
advertising wllh the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may 
receive a misleading male 
ment from another firm re 
questing payment Tor thla 
advertlalng. To receive prop- 
er credit lo your account, 
all payments for your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertlalng 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newi papers 

PO Box 268 

SOS. Whitney K. 

QrmriUkc. IL 00030-OaOS 



Parts Counter 

Liberty Coach Luxury 
Coach Builder, has open* 
ing for organized, detail 
minded person to run 
parts &. supply room 
Responsibilities include: 
Inventory, Ordering & 
Equipment- Loan. Good 
salary, benefits. Apply in 
person. 

1400 Morrow Ave. 
North Chicago, IL 
(708) 578-4600 



RECEPTION 
FT-PT 

Knollwood Animal Hospital 
20 N. Waukeoan Rd, 
UkeBlirfi, IL ' 
(708) 234-2002 
FTexiWo hours. Must know com- 
puter keyboard and ha vo phone 
skills. Must be able to work 
Friday Noon to 7:30 p.m. and 
Saturday Bam-lpm. AD other 
hours floxHe. CaU lor appoint 
ment or apply In parson. 




A CUT ABOVE 
THE REST... 

SUPERCUTS 

• Full and part time positions 
available 

• State-of-the-art Paid Advanced 
and Continued Training. 

• Full employee benefits 
Including medical with paid 
holidays and vacations. 

• Guaranteed Hourly Wage* 
plus Product commissions 
and Bonuses. 

• Management Opportunities 
available. 

• Hiring and referral bonuses 

• Built in clientele 

• Licensed Hairstylists and 
Barbers 

Stop by Supercuts 

716 S. Rand 

in Lake Zurich 

or Call 708-918-9999 

TODAY! 



[ 



DATA ENTRY 

1 yr. exp. ABC's 
and 123's 
X44-OOI6 



perior JLersonnel 



] 



j 



NinOUIPlOUl C BOBCATtj 
i OUnCRJ/OPERATOM J 



t 



GENERAL OFFICE 

Loads of Variety 

Lite Computer, Phones. 

244-0016 




perior JLersonnel 






Needed for snowplowing. 

Northshore area. Top payl 

Work today - pay tomorrow. 

Lots of hours. 

(706) 272-1747 






STORE 
MANAGER 

Exciting short-term Management position. 
Outlet Store seeks up beat professional for 
this special opportunity at our Gumee Mills 
store. Will pay top S for top notch individ- 
ual willing to make commitment to run 
high volume outlet store for a short-term 
assignment. 

Please fax resume and salary requirements 
to: 

Human Resources 

513-721-8116 

an equal opportunity employer 




ECiiCAL OppORT UNITIES 



Medcal 

ST. DAVID'S 
HEALTH CARE SYSTEM 

A progressiva & dynamic system 
w/300 acuta care beds, a 90 bod 
rehab facility, psych hosp, & outpa 
Horn clinics providing sves to 
sports/ortho, TBI, geriatric. SCI 
pain rrvgml & psych disorders, toe'd 
In Austin nr U ol TX campus seeks: 

STAFF PT»S 

'Acute Care 
•Brain Injury Team ■ 
'CVAIn-patieM rehab 
"TBI Team In-patient 
'Day Program outpatient 

SL David's Medical Center, 91S E 
32nd St, Austin. TX 7B705. (512, 
37W424; Fax: (512) 404-6014, 
EOE. • 



Medical Opportunities 

WINCHESTER HOUSE 

CNA'S 

All Shifts 

S7.41 up to $8.71/hour plus 
shift differential. Orientation 
January 4 & 5 or January 15 
& 16, 7am to 3pm. 

Submit applications or for 
further Information call: 

Jan Mound, ADON 
708-816-5149 

1125 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Ubertyvilte, IL 60048 

equal opportunity employer m/f 



Mtf oca] 

PHARMACY MANAGER F/T 

Devotee v evaluttot & •dmnltuni • com- 
prorwn wa ptamvjcy program contifling 
ol wilt data dtug dstnbuton lyMom h ■ 
lonQ-tamt cars bcUily, VAI be • rrarrtwr ol 
an knierOBpartiT«nW ca.is leam to Inciuos 
acivfl partopn \o n in numerous comrri em 
luncaont. Mud be ■ jfcllexJ tOvocala lor 
rha ganainc ci*m. ti>Utf to pwida Insgr- 
vidng on rredcaton lo both dianu S sail. 
S ihu In Oovetopmenl ol po.'xies. Mutt be 
able b obtain Mabruks's PhannadM Uc 
Annual siliry 140^41. &cc bens pkg. 
State-Run Fadliy. Contact Pertonne.' 
Oepl, Western Nebostui Veterans Home, 
1102 W. 42nd Su Swrtsbiuft, NE 63301. 
30B-632-33BI. EECAA 



'0000.00 



000^00000000 



NURSES 
AIDE 

All Shifts 

Flexible Hours 

4 Bed Group Home. 

Pleasant work 

environmenL 

Competitive salary. 

Please apply at 

860 South Lewis 

Waukegan 

(708) 244-2312 

EOE 



LPN/RN 

Two immediate part time 
positions available at a 15 
bed 1CF/DD. Includes 
weekend days, midnights, 
and some afternoon shifts. 
Experience with DD a big 
plus. Excellent pay. 

The 
Wright Home 

34377 North Almond Road 
Curnee, IL 60031 ■ 

(708) 855-9450 



QMRP 

to perform case 

management 

services to case 

load of MR/DD 

Women in 

residential setting. 

Bachelor's Degree 

and one year 

experience with 

MR/DD population 

required. 

Contact 
Gail Becker 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

(708) 438-5050 
Lake Zurich 



Laboratory 

Health Care 
Opportunities: 

Blood Bank 
Technician/Technologist 

Midwestern Regional 

Medical Center . has an 
excellent full-time position 
available. First shift, M-F. 
some . weekends and 
evenings as needed. 
Previous Blood Bank expe- 
rience necessary. 
Knowledge of Sunquest sys- 
tem a plus. Responsibilities 
to Include testing In Blood 
Bank and quality control 
maintenance. This Individ- 
ual will be trained to collect, 
process, and perform test- 
ing on peripheral stem cells. 

We offer an excellent com- 
pensation and benefits 
package Including med- 
Ical/dental/llfe, paid vaca- 
tions/holidays, 401(k), 
and more! For considera- 
tion, fax/send resume or 
apply In person: 

Susan Thomas 

Human Resources 

2501 Emmaus Avenue 

Zfon, IL 60099 

FAX: 708-872-6222 

Midwestern 

Regional 

Medical Center 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



CNA's 



^ilLLCREST 




Nursing Center 



•$6.75/Hr. to Start 
•Great Benefits 
•Excellent Working Conditions 
•Fantastic Opportunity 

Apply In Person 

1740 N, Circuit Dr. 
Round Lake Beach. IL 

(Behind Burger King on Rollins Rd.). 




CLASSIFIED Ukdwd Newspapers DtctMbtrt 15, 1995. 



. 






% 



■ 
t 



E 




MENT 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Carpenter Wanted 

•'If experience is limited, 

will consider & will train. 

Call Maddock 

Constriction today 

(708) 526-1500 



GOV'T - POSTAL JOBS 



NOW HIRING FOR 1996 
Start 23,800-34900/yr. 

Colls are now being 

accepted for employment 

Info application. 

1-818-506-5354 ext. 4039 



CHAUFFEUR 

Fall/Part Time. Will Train. 

Mm I be 25 fears old ami 

have a good driving record. 

Call (708) 549-0020 



HOME TYPISTS 

IPC users needed. $45,000 
[income potential. 

Call 1-800-513-4343 
Ext. B-4458 



retail 

HO, HO, HO! 

No ad extra monoy at tor tho 
Holiday Season? Call us now & 
work in January. S6,50-S7.Q0rtir. 
to start, we will train. 708/253- 
1t73 or 708/853-3636 alter 5pm. 
ROIS INVENTORY SPECIALIST. 
EOEM/F 



Mocha net 

DIESEL MECHANIC 

irmxHl oparang lw Machine tot tfe»l 
iruc* shop incl. ttivs ttam * enaaili 
ropair. Mult ha*s good rait. Wreliatite 
worii racofll Drug Screening raq'A Mui1 
Iwt own hand tool*; spaeiany too'» *up- 
pllad. Comp. wigov commenmrale 

Wanp. Pieate Fai/Mail 

W»ci-.ployrTW.I MHory 

Cf»ig. co site. 19701 



hi 

1 




225 



Business 
Opportunllies 



DISTRIBUTORS WANTED 
In Home Business Opportuni- 
ty. Very oasy. Work part or lull 
time, Mulli-mlillon dollar sates 
record. Very, very small Invesl- 
mont, Very Largo S Potenilal. 
NO gimmicks. All Natural 
Hoallh Products. FREE info: 
Large SASE to: CAS, Depl. 8, 
P.O. Box 505, Round Lako, III. 
60073. 

NELP WANTED 

Rops noeded to Hand out 

FREE PAGERS. 

EARN BIG $$$. 

Call (70?) 765-1558. 

IN-HOME BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITY. 

Stuffing envelopes tor money! 

Send SASE to: NLN Systems. 

P.O. Box 876. Lake Villa, lit. 

60046-0876. 



Make Money Now I 

Rapldty growing telecommunica- 
tions co. seeks Reps In this area 
Great financial opportunity lor full 
and pan time positions. Cait todayl 

(70B) 295-7900 

i hOM imii MT uni m wui 

TILfCOHWUHICATIOMl » ~!i 




CLEANING LADY NEED- 
ED, Mundelein, 1-2 days per 
week. Must like cats and dogs. 
References required. English 
. speaking, (708) 949-5950. 

HAIR CUTS, PERMS In 
your home, by licensed experi- 
enced stylist. Reasonable 
rales and references, (708) 
973-2461. 

a^aaaaa^HiBBBBBBBBBlIlPaaaaaaaaaaa«aaaaaaa^^r^->aas»>>>>>>>~ 

HOLIDAY HELPER; I will 
prepare your Christmas cards 
for you. Call Carta (708) 
548-1709. 




240 



Child Care 



1 



CHILD CARE NEEDED IN 
MY GURNEE HOME, Mon- 
day-Friday, flam-Spm. Begin 
ASAP. Must bo porky and on- 
orgotlc. Call (70B) 223-4567. 

EXPERIENCED LI- 
CENSED MOTHER of 1 will 
babysll In her Oraysiake 
homo, full or part-tlmo. (708) 
548-0870. 

GURNEE MOM WILL care 
for your preschoolor In her 
homo. (708)855-1372. 

MOTHER HAS 2-OPEN- 
INGS In my North Chicago 
homo, full or part-tlmo. (708) 
785-0229. 

MOTHER OF 1 will caro for 
your child in my Wlnthrop Har- 
bor homo. Days or evonlngs. 
Please call (708) 746-6215. 

PROFESSIONAL COUPLE 
SEEK experienced reliable 
nanny lo caro for infant In our 
homo 5 days a week. Spanish 
speakers welcome. Munde- 
lein. (708) 566-6379. 




ANTIQUE WOOD BURN- 
ING PARLOR STOVE 

(Thome Windsor) very deco- 
rative, $250. Anilquo metal 
bed, painted while, Si 00. 
Wards 6 cydo free standing 
dishwasher, white with butch- 
er block top. $125. (708) 
872-9080. 

SCOTT ANTIQUE MARKET 
1200 Antique Exhibitor 
Booths December 16 & 17 
Monthly - November i thro 
June • Ohio State Fairgounds 
- Columbus, Ohio 1-71. Exit 
17th Avenue (614)569- 

4112 



304 



appliances 



APPLIANCE SALEI All re- 
conditioned and warranteed. 
Refrigerators, freezers, rang- 
es, washers and dryers. Good 
selection. Good prices. While 
supplies last. Delivery and 
hook-up available. New Am- 
mana, Caloric and Gbson ap- 
pliances also available. Wahl 
Appliance Center, 1209 Court 
St., McHenry, III. (815) 
385-1872. 



310 


Bazaars/Crafts 



Holiday 

Floral & 

Gift Basket 

Boutique 

Open Saturday 
10am to 4pm 

36313 Fuller Rd. 
Gurnee 




314 



Building 
Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS: Winter 
Sale. Painted walla, 5,000 + 
■iie«. 30x40x10. 44,775; 
40x60x14, 48.648; 

50x60x14. $10,198; 

50x75x14, *1 1.689; 

60x80x14. 414.238; 

60x100x16. 417,617. 

Free brochures. Sentinel 
Buildings, 800-327-0790. 



318 



Business 
Office Equipment 



TWO ELECTRIC IBM 
TYPEWRITERS, self-cor- 
recting, Series II, great shape. 
Asking $195/best. (708) 
549-6226. 



LOVING, RELIABLE, NON- 
SMOKER parents, college 
educated In child care and de- 
velopment, I4yrs. experience. 
Lots of toys, stories, projocts, 
In our clean new home, 
snacks, excellent references. 
Spring Grove/Richmond area 
(off 173, east of Rl. 12). (815) 
675-1143. , 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



GATEWAY 2000 386, Okl 
lazer 400 printer, I6ln. color 
monitor, CD Ram, $975. (708) 
540-8214. 

000000 



320 


flcctrooJcs 
Computers 



ZENITH 27IN. WOOD 
CONSOLE TV, Systems 3, 
good condition, $300. (708) 
438-4076. 

IBM COMPATIBLE 406DX- 
OOMHZ, 4MB ram, 250HD, 
SVGA color monitor, 1.44 flop- 
py, software. $899. (708) 
073-1276. 

MITSUBISHI 28G LAP- 
TOP, modem, software, caso 
and Okldata 9 pin primer. 
$250ibost. (706) 548-0528. 

PAC-BELL 3B6, COLOR 
monitor, modom, software, 
and Panasonic 24 pin prlntor. 
3600/bost. (708) 548-0528. 



324 



Farm Guide 



FOR SALE HAY A STRAW. 

Hay first culling Alfalfa, $2.50 
per bale. Straw $2.00 per bale. 
Large Bales. (708) 395-8459, 
(414) 857-6477. 



328 



Firewood 



MIXED HARDWOOD FIRE- 
WOOD FOR SALE. $65 face 
cord. Delivered and stacked. 
(708) 566-9372. 



330 



Garage . 
Rummage Sale 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 
BIG SALE, and there Is still 
things that just did not go.... 
Call us at LAKELAND News- 
papers and run It under tho 
•FREE or Gtvoaways* classi- 
fied column. FREE ADS are 
NO CHARGEI (708) 
223-8161.ext. 140. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



344 


Jewelry 




LADIES SIZE 10/12 
Racoon coals, long and short. 
Also long down coat and car 
coat. (70S) 973-0342 call for 
best offer. 

MINK COAT. EXCELLENT 
condition. Size 14/16, 3/4 
length. Value $1,700, asking 
$600. (70S) 263-1550. 



350 



Miscellaneous 



EASY CHAIR, SOFA and 
Lovesoat, Blue, Mauve, 
Cream, $575. LEATHER 
sofa and lovesoat, $950, Ex- 
cellent condition, MUST SELLI 
(708)548-1046. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, complete $1,100. Din- 
ing room set, $1,700. OAK 
bedroom set $1,200, Oak 
dlnlngroom set $1,980. 
ALSO Sleigh bedroom sol, 
$1,745. All In PERFECT con- 
dition. MUST SELLI 
(708)548-1045. 

COLONIAL MASTER BED- 
ROOM furniture set. Chest, 
bureau with mirror, hutch and 
headboard, $450/bost. (414) 

862-9374. 

COUCH, LOVESEAT AND 

rocliner chair. Only used 
3/monlhs. S900/best. (414) 
697-9854. 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOME CONTENTS 

Sota/lovosoat set, hunter 
green and cranberry, $595. 
Sofa/loveseal set, oarth tones, 
$695. Other sets, plaids, 
stripes, florals, etc. Dining- 
room set, 10-pleco, $1,595. 
Bedroom sots, etc. (708) 329- 
4119. 

DINING TABLE, ANTIQUE 
style, solid oak, with 6-arm 
chairs, seats 8 or lokls In tor 
4, $550/best. Computer stand 
on wheols, $20. (414) 
653-9995. 

DININGROOM SUITE 

NEVER used, 7-pioce, con- 
temporary, wfth matching oj- 
rk). $2.000. (414) 697-7545. 

DININGROOM TABLE, 

CHAIRS, china cabinet. Ex- 
quisite Queen Anne Cherry 
wood. Complele, almost now. 
$1,650, (708) 374-9882. 

DISHES SET OF Currier & 
Ives, with serving pieces and 
teapot. (414) 857-2218. 

DUNCAN PHYFE MAHOG- 
ANY dining lablo and chairs, 
Including 2 side arms, china 
cabinet, $2,500. (708) 
662-4574. 

FOUR BLACK WROUGHT 
IRON CHAIRS on wheels 
with blue upholstered seats 
and pillow backs. I4tt.xi0tt. 
mauve carpot, excellent condi- 
tion, With pad. (708) 249-8373 
after 5pm. 

LARGE 8FT. COUCH, 
rugged brown fabric, oak trim. 
$70. (708) 336-3454. 

MATTRESS SETS, ANY 
size, never used. Retail, $550- 
$1,100. Sacrifice: $135-$295. 
(708) 913-8965. 

TEAK KING SIZE bed. In Ex- 
cellent condition. Mattress like 
new. 5400/bosl. (708) 223- 
6621. 



ARCADE GAMES FOR 
SALE. 'Just In time for Christ- 
mas.' Full slzo arcade games. 
Ideal for recrooms, baso- 
ments, etc. $150 & up, (708) 
689-9405. 

DOLLHOUSE, BEAUTI- 

FUL, FULLY furnished with 
electric. (708) 541-4638. 

FIFTY GALLON RHEEM 
GAS WATER HEATER 
E.C.; replaced by larger up- 
grade, $170, Sears water sot- 
toner E.C., needs timer ro- 
placed. $75. (708) 395-0579. 

FOR SALE 11 TABLETOP 
VENDING MACHINES. 

Three In locations, other loca- 
tions available. Brand new 
condition. $4,400/best. (414) 
857-7918 leave mossage. 

HEATER, LARGE, TORPE- 
DO, 24.000 BTU. $100/best. 
TV-color console, 26ln. 
screen, works, $50. 1950 Ply- 
mouth. 1979 1-ton Chevy. 
$500/each. (414) 862-2251. 

I GOT 27.4% MORE 
MILES PER GALLON with 
the new Fuel Charger fuol line 
dovlce from JSLTI And watt tin 
you see Iho results from a 
MAJOR engine builder on our 
Diesel Charger! It's real, It's 
science, and it LOWERS 
EMISSIONS too, even In new 
cars. Call Jerry, (708) 
548-7437. 

PAGERS THAT JUST 
WORK. No activation foes. No 
monthly fees. Conversion lo 
AM Systems. (708) 
973-1250. 

POOL TABLE. CALL (or do- 
talte. (708)623-3818. 

POOLTABLES 
Beautllul reconditioned slate 

pool tables and Holiday 

recoveries al very reasonable 

prices) Compare & Savo $$$ 

Call: On The Level 

Pool Table Specialists 

(708) 838-0091 

(Antloch). 

TRY THE NORDIC 

TRAC'S WALK FIT with 
oxtra computer Included. Paid 
$700. Used only 10 limes. 
S5O04wsl. (815) 675-2749. 

000000 



360 



Pels & Supplies 



350 


Miscellaneous 



TWO MENS DIAMOND 
RINGS. One 1/2 carat T.W. 
and one 1/2 carat solitaire 
champagne diamond. Bolh for 
SOOOVbost. CaD Mark (708) 
244-3718. 



LEARN THE SHOCKING 
TRUTH ABOUT YOUR 
HEALTH AND NUTRITION I 
Call Fred Jarotr at (800)587- 
8288 ^ 

SUNQUEST WOLFF TANNING 
BEDS Commercial - Homo. 
Units From 4199. Buy Fac- 
tory Direct and SAVE! Call 
. TODAY for NEW FREE Color 
Catalog 1-800-462-9197 

INSULATION, 4x8 sheets, 
follbacked foam. factory 
seconds, easy to Install, 
contact Ken Nichols, 217- 
728-4217 or 1-80O-424-1 256 
AIRPLANE PROPS-lmporter 
liquidating beautiful 63" solid 
mahogany propellers. Great 
for wall decor/.gifts. Only 
• 90.96 + S/H, Credit cards 
OK, 100% satisfaction guar- 
anteed. To order call 916- 
483-7401. 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



LIKE NEW ARROW Dart 

eloctrlc scooter for the handi- 
cap. Excellent shape with man- 
ual. Asking $800. Lynne (708) 
973-1646. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



CHRISTMAS SPECIAL 

PIANO TUNING 

$30 

REG. $€5. 

ONE WEEK ONLY. 

(312)802-8147 
LEAVE MESSAGE. 

HAMMOND ORGAN 

SPINET model M100 serios, 
light finish. $600/bost. (414) 
862-9534. 

PIANO BALDWIN HOW- 
ARD. Uko now, sounds great, 
sacrifice $1,600/bost. (414) 
882-6911. 

WURLITZER ORGAN 

WITH bench. Good condition. 
$350.(815)675-1007. 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



DOG BOARDING- 
WHY LEAVE your "little 
friend" In a pen while you vaca- 
tion. I can offer dependable, 
reliablo care lor your dog4>up 
In my homo. Lots of T.LC. 
Loads of groat references and 
rave reviews. Call or leave 
message at (708) 966-6319. 

60 GALLON MOLDED 
ACRYLIC AQUARIUM. 

Solid wood cabinet & canopy, 
light, under gravel tlltor. 
$4S0/besl. (708) 740-8840 
leave message. 

AKC BLACK LAB PUPPIES, 
ready 1/6/96, males $250, fe- 
males $300.(815)675-2235. 

AKC COCKER SPANIEL 
PUPS with champion lines. 2- 
buii males loft. Bom 11/2/95. 
Christmas ready! $350/each. 
Adult female buff, lyr. old, 
$250. Excellent tempera- 
ments. (708) 740-2016. 

AKC GERMAN 

SHEPHERD PUPPIES, 2- 
males. (708) 740-8624. 



360 


Pets & Supplies 



360 



Fcts& 

Supplies 



AKC GERMAN 

SHEPHERD PUPPIES. 

Bom 10/10/95. Woaned and 
ready for now loving homo. 
$275/best. Must hayo yard. 

(708) 395-6088, 

BOXER PUPPIES, AKC, 5- 

malos, 1-femalo, fawn/brlrtdlo, 
$3S0-$400, (708) 587-7529. 

COLLIE PUPPIES, BORN 
SEPT. 9TH, 1995. HAD 

2nd shots, chocked by veteri- 
narian, eyos checkod. AKC 
registered. Sablo and whlto, 
(708)459-9044. 

DACHSUND PUPS AKC, 
black and tan, 10 weeks old, 
dowctaws removed, 1st. shots, 
$300. (414) 843-4172, 

DO YOU ENJOY working 
with animals? Do you have 2 
hours per week to spare? Assi- 
st Animal Foundation, one ol 
the area's no-kill shelters Is 
seeking volunteers for work 
that Is highly rewarding and 
funl Wo nood men and 
women who: can work with 
cats and dogs, do light repair 
work and can answer phonos 
and other office duties. We are 
located In Crystal Lako. For 
more Information please call 

(815)459-0990. 

DOG GROOMING 
BY KAREN 

Most breeds. 
$2 off with this ad. 
First time clients. 

(708) 356-3449 
Undonhurst. 



Uquld wormers not doing the 
job? Get HAPPY JACK 
TRIVERMICIDE. Gets hooks, 
rounds, & tapes In dogs & 
cats. Available O-T-C. At 
farm feed & hardware stores. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPPIES AKC, beautiful. Par- 
ents on promises. $40O-$450. 
Black and Ian. Roady to go 
12/22. Father Is show dog. 
Chooso now. (708) 740-3910. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPS AKC, OFA largo 
boned, German Champions, 
SCH lines. Parents on promis- 
es. Wisconsin-Illinois border, 
$350. (414) 942-0590. 

GERMAN SHEPHERDS 

AKC, Champion bloodlines, 
pups, adults, from breeder ex- 
hibitor of 28yrs. $10O-$450. 
(708)587-6081. 

HEDGE HOGS (AFRICAN 
Pygmy), males & females. 
Ready for Christmas, wiih 
complete packages. $50- 
$100. (708) 746-8168. 

ST. BERNARD PUP AKC, 
$375. (414) 894-0303 after 
5pm. 



370 



Wanted To Buy 




mmmx 



PIANOS WANTED. CASH 

for any piano under 49ln. \al. 
In need of repair or not. (414) 
248-6491. 

Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or Parts. 
Also JUKE BOXES, MUSIC 
BOXES, Nickelodeon and 
Coke Machines. Paying 
CASHI Call (708)985-2742. 

DlREGTORy 



S30 



Firewood 



S42 



Landscaping 



iAIAAaiAiiai 

J Seasoned Hardwood * 

k Oak -Ash -Hickory 

A $65 Face- $145 Full A 

A FREED Emmy A 

A (708) ^TOOD or (708) } 54-JjH A 
A Over 100 Repeal Customers A 
iaiiiiiaiiAA 



Fantastic Firewood 

2yr. old seasoned hardwood 
Oak, Mb, Maple, Cherry 

$64 per Fsec Cord Mliea" 

$74 per fw Cord 100* OA 

Free sucking 4 delivery 

Buy the wood trots 

guaranteed to bum. 

708-54*5-3613 
815-344-9522 
1-800-430-6262 



FIREWOOD 
UNLIMITED 

In business 23 years 

Free slacking *. delivery 

Prompt. courteous service , 

MIXED HARDWOODS 

oKB'74rc 

CHEUkT, BIRCH & HICKORY 

*84r.c 

■Durartf m 2 cr mar CndJt Curds acorj*fd 

(708) 876-0111 




PLUMBER REMODELING, 
INSTALLATION, repair and 

small construction. Free esti- 
mates. (708) 587-0166 Li- 
cense #058-136-730. 





TREAT YOURSELF TO A 

CLEAN HOUSE FOR THE 

HOLIDAYS! 

I offer Good-Old Fashlonod- 

Scrab-lt-CIean-Servlce. 

$5 Discount for 

first tlmo customers. 

Until 12/22/95. 

Call Nancy's Cleaning 

Service. 

(708) 973-1245. 



MINI-STORAGE UNITS, 

ISLAND LAKE. Available Oc- 
tober 15th. $30-$130, 5ft.x5f1. 
to 10ttJ(30ft. (708) 487-8673. 



S93 


i Trees/Plants 



RET OF THE WEEK IS57 



totag/Dccoraling 



5 - '* 



ITS »**. **m 

Id..' ■*. li . 



%v 



'.* 



~c , 



&A$ "Snow" and "Rusty" are two 
JvT? adorable, one year old brother and 
Sf 3 ^ tT roosuy greyhound mixes. 
" Extremely attached and devoted to 
each other, they roust be adopted 
together. Snow is a lovely spayed 
-* female. She has a pretty dove-white 
Snow & Rusty ^ scattered uithyfiht brown 

I dapples and expressive brown 

eyes. Snow has a wed, quiet, calm and loveable disposition and she ■ 
just glows when you give her attention. This gentle girl looks lo Rusty 
lor encouragement and guidance. 

Rusty is a handsome neutered male with a reddish brown coat 
highlighted wiih black and while. Rusty is a real character, lull of fun- 
lo>ing playfulness, and like his sister he responds Joyfully lo affection 
and attention. Both dogs are good wilh children and possess the quali- 
ties that people have come to admire in utegreyhound breed. Here' 
since April of 1995, this wonderful pair would love lo go home with you 
for the holidays! Cage JO. 

Cash $55 donation (per dog) includes free spay/neuter, collar, lag, 
leash, first shots, follow-up care, and much more. 

Orphans of the Storm Is located at 2200 toawoods Rd, 
DeerBeld. Hours are 1 1 am - 5 p.m., seven days a week. Call (708) 
945-02J5 for further information. 



FALL SPECIAL 

30% off all labor. 

Precise painting. 

New construction, 

or we will make It new. 

(70S) 546-2860 

(708 395r0490. 



TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing 
VVWesaJe Seasoned Hardwood 

Nordstrom Tree 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

708-526-0858 



S39 



Housekeeping 



S39 


Housekeeping 



■jiiiiiiiirniHiin iiiiiiiiMtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiniiiiniiiiliiiiTu? 



I Double KK Kteaning 

-Professional Cleaning 
-Reasonable Rates 

-Dependable 
-Great References 

We Take Pride in What We Do 

CALL KIM FOR A FREE IN-HOME QUOTE 

(708) 546-3408 



■riiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimi iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiir. 
















DeccMbf* 1$, 199$ UkcUNd Newspapers CLASSIFIED. 



] 



] 



J 
] 





BUYERS: FREE LIST x of 
Homoa For Sato by owner. 
SELLERS SAVE $THOU- 
SANDSS. Holp-U-Soll. (708) 

548-aoeo. 

FOREST PARK MOTIVAT- 
ED seller, 4B43 67th Streot. 
REDUCED $113,900. Need 
I last sale! CaJI (414) 657-1731 
| for ap pointment. . 

IGRAYSLAKE 3-BED- 

ROOM, WINDOW base- 

Imont, 3-1/2 car heated ga- 

[rage, 2-1/2 baths, fireplace, 

/autiod ceilings, sky lights, 

lock and much more. 

M3. 000, f70fl) 223-7706. 

IET MORE FOR LESS 3- 
idroom, 2-bath. full baao- 
Ghent, 2-car garage. Only 5yrs. 
:'pjd.- Better Hurry! $107,000. 1- 
iaoo-359-1485 Wayne Moran 
v BEMAX PLAZA. 

, LAKE VILLA INVEST- 
MENT OPPORTUNITY. 
Hinder "construction. Sold as Is 
tor completed. Add your finish- 
■fig touches to this 2/3 bed- 
Boom ranch, large kitchen, 
faulted ceilings, sky lights. On 
jouble lot with lake fights. 
i.O OO. (708)438-0901. 

HENRY QUALITY 

3UILT 4-bedroom, 2-1/2 
iath brick ranch, finished 
aasement, fenced yard with 
[rtvor access, 3-car. $187,000. 
tent /Option. (708) 43B-O901 . 

rou CAN own your own 

>mo! No downpay merit on 

jMllai matarialt, attractive 
"rf""" flnwwInQ,- Call 
Mltat Homo* iod*y,- t-ooo- 
343-2884 oxt. 1. ' " " 

Have you aeon the new Wick 
Cuitom Homoa? Chooio from 
over 60 door plana. For free 
brochure or tour of* modal 
noaroit you, call 1-800-442- 
WICK. 



OPEN HOUSE 1PM-5PM, 
SATURDAY * SUNDAY. 
PRICED TO SELL. Nowly 
remodeled, 3- bod room, 2- 
bath, 2-1/2 car garage, fire- 
place, new carpoling, al ap- 
pliances, screened porch, pri- 
vate subdivision plus boat 
facilities. By owner. $139/400. 
37368 W. Lakeshore Dr., Lake 
Villa. (59 (o Busse Rd. to 
house). ■ - ' "' 



BUILDER CLOSING OUT 
HOUSES AT REDUCED 

PRICESI Ready for your fam- 
ily, Al have energy efficient 
thermopane windows, 2x6 
walls (R-20), R-38 ceilings. 
FINANCING AVAILABLE, 
contract sale, rent/option pos- 
sible on some. - 
•CRYSTAL LAKE - Brick- 
Cedar 2800sq.ft., 4-bodroom 
ranch, 3.5 car garage. 
$J40 | W0. Now $324,900. 
Lot's talk.) 

MOHNSBURG/McHENRY 
Bl-level, 2-bedrooms, i-balh, 
C/A, lower level roughed In for 
2nd bathroom. Near river. 
2yrs. old. $129,900, 
*McHENRY3-bodroom 
ranch, 2-bath, 2-car garage, 
vaulted ceilings. Can bo ready 
by Novermer 15th. $ 440| 000» 
$149,900 on November sale. 
CALL BUILDER DIRECT 
AND SAVE ON ABOVE 
HOUSES. (708) 526-6306. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 

bedroom tri-tovel, kitchen with 
pantry, finished . family room, 
15 baths, possble 4lh bed- 
room, 2-1/2 car garage. 

9114,500. (708> 374.B73S 

3 Undo Worehel PRUDENTIAL 
POE&POE. 

WE BUY HOUSES, any 

size, any condition. Fast dose. 
(708) '438-0901. 




BEACH PARK SPOTLESS 

3-bedroom, garage, applianc- 
es. No pels. No Section 8. No 
smoking. $700mionth plus se- 
curity, (708) 872-8664. 

GRAYSLAKE 3-BED- 

ROOMS, 2-BATHS, com- 
pletely renovated, A/C, at- 
tached garage, basement. 
No pels. 5975/monih, lease 
and 2 months security deposit 
required. (708) 362-5600. 

HALF MONTH .FREE 

RENT, 2-bedroom cottage on 
Polle Lake, $600/month, heat 
Included, plus security depos- 
H. No dogs. (708) 395-5045. 

HOUSE FOR RENT 3-4 

bedrooms, recently remo- 
deled, 2-story with partial 
basement. Nice qulot street In 
Twin Lakes. $590/month phis 
$590 security deposit, lyr. 
lease, available January 1, 
1996. (708) 795-0055 or 
(708)367-0745. 

L1NDENHURST RANCH 3- 
5 bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, up- 
dated kitchen and newer ap- 
pliances. Full finished base- 
ment, fenced yard with shod, 
2-car attached garage. Antl- 
och schools. Available 1/1/96. 
$1,150/rnonth plus utilities. Se- 
curity deposit and credit refer- 
ences. No pets. (815) 
675-1143. __ 

MCHENRY LARGE 4-BED- 
ROOM, 2-1/2 bath ranch, fin- 
is hod basement, fenced yard 
with river access, 3-car. 
$1.4O0/month.. Rent/opllon. 
<7oa>43a-oeoi. . 

TWO BEDROOM, COUN- 
TRY living, non smoker, no 
pels. Available 1/1/96. No ga- 
rage. $850/hmnth plus securi- 
ty deposit. (708) 223-Q729. 

WAUKEGAN 1-BEDROOM 

SINGLE fa miry home, Victor- 
ian setting, of) street parking. 
Available . now. (70S) 
336-0144. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



W'."" 




II 



LUNDER 

The attractiveness of the 2312 square foot Lunder begins with the outer surface. Beautiful cul- 
tured stone, Integrated with durable stucco, fbrm3 an exterior that will require minimum upkeep 
through the years while maintaining a high market value. 

A concrete stoop leads to .the rece as ecf front entry, featuring a vaulted celling and handy guest 
closet The sleeping areas are concentrated on the left side of the home. Tho large master suite has 
a home security system Installed tor your safety and peace of mind. Other amenities Include a roomy 
walk-in closet, bay window and private bathroom. The two front bedrooms, each with a big window 
and ample closet space are close enough to the master suite for parents to quickly respond to the 
needs ol smaller children. Either of these bedrooms can be easily converted Into a home office or 
den. A full bathroom and linen storage are nearby. : 

The vaulted living and dining rooms are open lo each olher, creating a nice uncrowded space to 
accommodate your visitors. A built-in entertainment center wilt provide you with hours ol enjoyment 
The dining room contains lighted cabinets that are also accessible from the walk-through kitchen. 
With a close-by walk-In pantry, Island cooklop and garden window, the airy kitchen allows easy serv- 
ing to the dinTng room and the and the spacious family room/breakfast nook. The family room offers 
access to a long back deck equipped with waist high railing. This is the perfect spot to set up the 
barbecue and invite your friends over on a lazy summer afternoon. From the breakfast nook, sliding 
glass doors take you down Into a generous covered patio. Brightened by multiple skylights, settle In 
here with a glass of lemonade and a good book whan you want a little solitude. 

Located conveniently near Ihe inside entrance to the garage Is a sizeable utility. room. In addition 
lo space for a washer and dryer, there Is a deep sink and toilet The 828 square foot garage will not 
only house three vehicles, but has extra storage space and a built-in workbench for lackllng those 
weekend projects. 

For a study kit of the LUNDER, (404-08), send $10.00, to Landmark Designs, P.O. BOX 2307- 
LP60, Eugene, OR 97402 (Be sure to specify plan name & number). For a collection of plan books 
featuring our most popular home plans, send $20 to Landmark, or call 1-800-562-1151. 



ZAMPARO AND GOLDSTEIN, P.C. 
. ~ Attorneys for Plaintiff 
899 Skokle Boulevard, Suite 300 
■ Northbrook, Illinois 60062 
(708) 564-3100 
STATE OF ILLINOIS, COUNTY OF LAKE, SS. -IN THE CIR- 
CUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. LaSALLE NATIONAL BANK. AS 
TRUSTEE FOR AFC MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET BACKED 
CERTIFICATES/SERIES 1994-2, UNDER THE POOLING AND 
SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF JUNE 1, 1994, 
PLAINTIFF v. WILLIE MASSEY, TCF CONSUMER FINANCIAL 
SERVICES. INC., HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III, 
UNKNOWN TENANTS, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON 
RECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS, NO 95 CH 206. 

Public, notice Is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment 
made and entered In said Court In the above-entitled cause, the 
Sheriff of Lake County, Illinois, will, on Monday, January 29, 
1996, at the hour or 9:00 a.m. at 25 South UtJca, Waukegan, 
Illinois, sell at public auction the following described premises 
and real estate mentioned In said Judgment, situated In Lake 
County, Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satis- 
fy the Judgment to-wit -' 

3024 Gideon, Zion. Illinois 60099. Improved with a single fam- 
ily residence. 

Sale shall be under Ihe following terms: 10% down, balance 
within 24 hours. Premises will not be open for Inspection. 

For information contact ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C, 
Plaintiffs Attorneys, 699 Skokle Boulevard, Suite 300, 
Northbrook, Illinois 60062, Telephone: (70S) 564-3100. 

Dated: November 27, 1995. Waukegan, Illinois. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO, 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Mellon Mortgage Company, 

Plaintiff, Case No. 95 C 2648 

VS. Judge Duff 

Bruce E. Chevrette and Linda M. Chevrette, 
F.E Troncone, As Trustee and Associates 
Finance, Inc. 

Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 27646 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
Qm ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on August 24. 1995. 

I, Robert Seneschalle, Special Commissioner for this court will 
on January 25, 1998 at the hour of 8:30 a. m. at the front door of 
Lake County Courthouse, 16 N. County, Waukegan, Illinois, sell 
to the highest bidder for cash, the following described premises: 
27 Hillcrest Ave., Fox Lake, IL 60020 
The Improvements on the property consist of single family, 
brick constructed. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
The judgment amount was $86,234.01. 
Upon the sate being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified dale unless the property Is redeemed according to law, 
For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, Ihe Sales 
Officer b ool required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. /a/ Robert Seneschalle 

Special Commissioner 



Case No. 95 C 3017 
Judge GETTLEMAN 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Wid first Bank, State Savings Bank f/k/a 
Mldfirst Savings and Loan Association, 

Plaintiff, 
VS. 

Monya L Webb, The Countryside Hills 
Homeowners Association, 
Defendants. 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
aiiBRUMomra 

OT 13 ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on August 8. 1995 . 

I, Alan Mills, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
January 17, 1996 at the hour of 1:30 p.m. at the front door of 
Lake County Courthouse, 18 N. County Street Waukegan, 
Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described 
premises: 

510 Meadow Hill Lane, Round Lake, IL 60073 

The improvements on the property consist of town house, alu- 
minum, two story dwelling with a two car garage, 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The Judgment amount was $76,830.45, 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Receipt of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4764 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer Is opj required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 






IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Chemical Residential Mortgage Corporation, a 
New Jersey Corporation f/k/a Margaretten and 
Company, Inc. 

Plaintiff, Case No. 95 C 0536 

VS. Judge Lindberg 

Paul E. Schlattman, 
Defendant 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONERS SALE • 

(TT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR i 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BtODtNQ AT FORECLOSURE SALES) I 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement J 
entered In the above entitled cause on Au qurt 25. 1995 . 

I, Stephen Nagy, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
January 11, 1996 at the hour of 11:15 a.m. at the front door of 
Lake County Courthouse. Waukegan, Illinois, sell lo the highest 
bidder for cash, the following described premises: 

86 Abbey Lane, Round Lake Park, IL 60073 

The Improvements on the property consist of single family, 
aluminum siding, townhouse with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sate shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments: 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $143,281.36 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser lo a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer Is D£i required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 




LOOICWHAT'S COMING 
UP IN JANUARY!!!! 

"HOT REAL ESTATE HOMES 
WAITING FOR YOU" 

REAL ESTATE SECTION 

2X3 WITH PROPERTY PHOTO 
only $ 60.00 

(Regular price for a 2x3 is $93.00) 

You Save $ 33. 00!! 

Deadline Jan. 12,1996 

CALL YOUR ACCOUNT 
EXECUTIVE TODAY AT 

223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 




Sunnyvale, LOVELY! 

Ttoo story Tudor house. 4br, 2.5ba, huge family rm 
w/firep!ace, formal dining rm, sunken living rm 
w/fp, huge bonus room and so much more! 

$000,000 

Lakeland Realty 

708-000-0000 



t ^M *...*- W 




CLASSIFIED LvkdANd Newspapers Decker 15, 1995. 



■ 



m 



"/ 




508 


Homes Wanted 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



520 



Apartmenls For Rcnl 



STOP FORECLOSUHE- 

ARE YOU FACING BANK- 
RUPTCY- DIVORCE- 
*»:' PROBATE- UNEMPLOY- 
MENT. Wo Buy Houses. 
Wa Loan Money. All Cash 
or Termo. Fast Settle- 
ment. Scott: (70S) 
945-8235. 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



AFFORDABLE LAKE- 
FRONT IN Paddock Lako, 2- 
bodrooms, with loft, 2-baihs. 
flroplaco. All appliances. 
Groet decor-balcony over- 
looks lake. No pets. No 
smokors. $600/monlh plus Util- 
ities. (706) 59O-B390. 

CHICAGO HIGH RISE, 
Shoridan Rd. North ol Foster, 
l-bodroom, 850sq.fl„ 5 clos- 
ols, newty rehabbed, 24hr. 
doorman, Indoor garago, adja- 
cent to park. Low assoss- 
monls. (700) 662-^574. 

SPACIOUS NEW TOWN- 
HOUSE 2-BEOROOM, 2- 
t/2 bath. 1-car garago. fiJC, 
vvashor/dryor, Sl.l00/monlh. 
(706) 549-16T4. . 

ROUND LAKE MODERN 3- 
BEDROOM lownhomo, 1- 
1/2 baths, 1-car garage, SEC- 
TION B WELCOME. (414) 

089-4181. .• 

STOP PAYING RENT! 
Have tho prestige ot being a 
homeowner. Foxgrove Town- 
homes ol Kenosha can help. 
Newty remodotod 3-bodroom, 
■\-V2 beAh. CtoMrJe tlnanclog 
with $2,900 down. SG7.900. 
4035 2fllh Ave.. Unit *7. Call At 
at (414) 057-5160. 



1-BEDROOM APART- 

MENT, ROOMY, gas and 
electric Included. 3550/monlh 
plus security. (708) 526-1343. 

AFFORDABLE LAKE- 
FRONT IN Paddock lake. 2- 
bodrooms, with loft, 2-baths, 
flroplaco. All appliances. 
Great decor-balcony over- 
looks lako. No pets. No 
smokers. SBOO/monlh plus util- 
ities, (708) 59Q-B390. 

FOR RENT QUIET apart- 
ment In Spring Grove, all utili- 
ties furnished, 1-bodroom, liv- 
Ingroom, kitchen, storage 
space available. S500/mon1h 
(B15) 675-1100. (70B) 432- 
B574. 

GILMER 1-BEDROOM 

APARTMENT, In rural sot- 
ting, Soulhwest of Mundeleln. 
S600/month. (708) 566-9704. 

GRAYSLAKE AREA 2- 
ROOM KITCHENETTE 
APARTMENT. Available Im- 
mediately. $525/month, hoal 
and electric Included, (708) 
SGC-5564. 

IMPERIAL TOWER & 
IMPERIAL MANOR 
QUIET BUILDINGS 
LARGE SPACIOUS 

APARTMENTS 

AIR CONDITIONING 

PRIVATE BALCONIES 

IARGE CLOSETS 

PRIVACY WALLS 

CONVENIENT LAUNDRY 

FACILITIES. 

CALL (708) 244-9222. 



UNION GROVE MANAG- 
ERS Fall Special! 1/2 monlh 
rent froo. Studio, 1 & 2 bod- 
room apartmenls. Prices 
begin at $395/month. Socurlty 
deposit samo as one months 
rent. Mlnl-bllnds, colling fans, 
appliances and gas heat In- 
cluded. Call today for an ap- 
pointment* Counirysldo Apart- 
monl3 (414)876-9755. 

ZION 1-BEDROOM, 

CLEAN, free heat, coin laun- 
dry, parking, water, 
$450/monlh. (708) 587-6360. 

ZION FURNISHED 1-BED- 
ROOM. Perfect tor newly 
wods or student. Non- 
smokers preferred. 
J435/month plus deposit. 

(706) 746-0708. 

TWO BEDROOM, 2ND 
floor. Neat and clean. Range 
and fridge. Waukegan. 
5600/monlh plus security and 
UllllllOS. (708) 623-3753. 

WESTWIND 

VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zion 

Appliances- Custom Blinds 

On-site Manager 

No Pets 

Call 

Martha & Isaac 

(708) 746-1420 



518 



Mobile Homes 




t=J 



12X60 2-BEDROOM, ALL 
appliances and lumiiuro stay, 
big shed, extra nice park. 
SB.OOQVbast. (708) 249-3791. 

GRAYSLAKE CHAIN O' 
LAKES MOBILE HOMES 
R1. 120 & FairllekJ. 2-bedroom, 
1-bath, C/A, shed, large lot, 
front dock, $27,000. Stop at of- 
fice or Can (708) 546-2316 
leave message. 

MOBILE HOME 14X70 3- 
bedroom, 2-balh. Woodland 
Schools. S14.000 ASAP. (708) 
623-7409. 

WAUCONDA ADULT COM- 
MUNITY HARMONY VIL- 
LAGE 9 Homes ready, to 
move In. $34,900 to $62,980. 
Most 2-bedrooms, 2-baths, 
some garages, all carports. 
Open 7 days a week. (708) 
526-5000. 

MODULARS "DOUDLEWIDES 
• SINQLEWIDES ■ TWO 
STORY MODULAR ON DIS- ' 

PLAYI FOUNDATIONS * 

BASEMENTS * GARAGES • 

WELLS 'SEPTIC. WE DO IT 

ALLIl FREE STATEWIDE 

DELIVERY/SET. RILEY 

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1- 

800-798-1541 



J$- REDUCED FROM $925 

TO $850 

THRU 12/31/95 

$300 SECURITY DEPOSIT 

W/APPROVED CREDIT* 



KEEP YOUR 

$$ IN YOUR 

POCKETS 

"AskAbout 
Our Special! 

•Heat, cooking & water Included - 
•Exceptional closet space 

•Personable management 
CALL TODAY 

WATERS EDGE APARTMENTS 

250 S. Rt . 59, Fox Lake/Ingleslde 
708-587-6888 



J 



ANITA TERRACE 
APARTMENTS 

SHORT TERM RATES AVAIL. 
$620 MO. + SEC. DEP. 

1ST MO. FREE RENT* 

•(QUALIFIED APPLICANTS 12 MO. LEASE} 

SENIOR CITIZEN INCENTIVES 

CALL (708) 838-0655 

MINUTES TO 1-94, ROUTES 45, 83, AND 59. TRAIN STATION 
(NEXT SPRING) WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE. 



M^dm&Ue 



T M 





N T 



•Free Basic Cable 

•Mini Blinds & Verticals Included 

•Bay Windowed Kitchen 

•Microwave Ovens 

•Gas Ileal & Gas Cooking 

••Central Air 

'Security Lkpasit Special applies 
toSbrm, tblb&l htm opl 

708-356-1550/5010 
LINDENHURST 

5-1/2 miles West of 1-94 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



LIBERTYVILLE 2-BED- 
ROOM, 1-BATH In quia! 4- 
unit building, carpollng, heat 
and wator Included. Ideal loca- 
tion, - 1/4 block to bus. 
S655/monlh. HQ PETS OH 
WATERBEDS . (708) 
326-6674. 

MUNDELEIN RT. 176, 

boautlfut 1-bodroom apart- 
ment. Near shopping, and 
train. Quiet neighborhood. 
Next to Loch Lomon Lake. 
5600/rnonth, plus security de- 
posit. All utlllllos except eloc- 
trlc. Available January 1. (706) 
566-8361. 




The 

Corporate Suite 

or Presidential 



Villas 

**•• 
Quality & Service 

Tkfcc i tour of our fully furnish cd luxu- 
ry I & 2 bedroom apu. it our newest 
location Northern Groulngl located 
aoou frrxn Buler Lab*. Phoee, utili- 
tie i A maid jcrvice avail. 30 day mini- 
mum atay. 

Call 708/473.2246 



uiininiiiiiii i n i mim i 



STATIONS! DE 
VILLAGE 

5215 111H AVENUE i 
KENOSHA, m 

Luxurious Living 
: : Apartments & Townbouses 
2 Bedrooms - 2 Baihs 
Mini Blinds 
Appliances 
: ■ * Ganges 'AnJJable "''' -: : 
i Elevators 
No Pets 
iii Call (414) 656-1010 :! 

fyiimmtmnmimmtm 



************ 

* Ingleslde * 

J **300.°° J 

it Security Deposit * 

* on • 

* One & TWo Bedrooms * 

* ,c.«u H . * 



•Spacious 
•Private Balconies 



* 
£ 'Short term leases avail. ^ 

* Lakeview * 

* Apartments * 

I (708)587-9277 * 

•*V 'qualified applicants, 1 yr tease -/Or 
************ 



IMPERIAL TOWER 
& IMPERIAL MANOR 

Quiet Buildings 

Large Spadous Apartments 

Air Conditioning 

rYivale Balconies 

large Closets 

Privacy Walls 

Convenient Laundry Facilities 

CALL 

(708) 244-9222 






DEEPIAKE 
HERMITAGE 

SPACIOUS 1 
BEDROOM SUITES 

• Free gas heal, 
cooking & water 

• Air Conditioner In 
each unit 

• Wall-to-wall Carpeting 

• Ample closet space 

• Appliances included 

• Tennis & 
' Basketball Courts 

• Laundry facilities 
in building 

$ 545 tS> 



149 N. Milwaukee 

Lake Villa, IL 
(708) 356-2002 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



QUIET COUNTRY CON- 
DO, Just over stalo tine, ap- 
pliances, 2-bedrooms, 1-1/2 
balha, largo yard, parking. 
5625/month plus security. Call 
Gerald (414) 604-6289. . 

LAKE VIEW TERRACE 

APARTMENTS. Large 1+2- 
bodroom apartments. Lako Vil- 
la. $555 and $680/month. 
Hoal • wator, air Included. 
(708)356-5474. 



520 



ApL/lfomcs 
To Share 



FEMALE ROOMMATE TO 
SHARE 2-bedroom, 1-bath, 
With samo. Deluxe apartment, 
Undonhurst. $400/month plus 
half Utilities. (708)356-3054. 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

avaltablo Immediately, 3-bed- 
room, 2-1/2 bath lownhouso, 
Vomon Hills, $41 0/month plus 
utilities. Non smoker. Fur- 
nished available. (708) 
549-8480 



530 



Rooms For Rent 



THRIFT LODGE, 222 W. 
Grand Ave. Weekly specials. 
$155.40 tax Included. (708) 
244-8950. " 

WINTER SPECIAL. Weekly 
rates, $150/Wk. Monthly rates 
available also. Low dally rates 
available. Clean rooms. Winter 
special. (708) 689-4500. 



534 



Business Property 
For Sale 



INDUSTRIAL 
SPACE 

Rent, purchase, 
or lease with option 

to purchase in 

new complex located 

In fast growing , 

community oi 

Spring Grove. 

Calf for 

informs* tioxi 

815-675-6183 




Business Property 
For Rent 



29TH AVE. 6813 ofllcos or 7 
950sq.lt., modem, carpeted, 
air, parking, 2nd floor, 
$290/month. (414) 835-1216. 

LAKE ZURICH Downtown 
Professional/Medical. 500- 
ISOOsq.ft. (708) 566-2252. 

ROUND LAKE INDUSTRI- 
AL Building, 7,000sq,ft., 20ft. 
clear. Call Charles Sharp 
(815) 741-7000. 

ROUND -LAKE ROLLINS 
RD., commerclal/oftlce 
space. 3200sq.fl. with loading 
dock and I4,000sq.tl. vacant 
lot. Will divide. Call Bob (708) 
381-6966. 

WAUKEGAN/GURNEE, 
NEWLY REDONE otflce and 
retail; 300-1 300sq .D . available. 
Prime heavy traffic location. 
Good access and parking. 
(708) 855-8515. 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



OFFICE SPACE 

Ubcrtyville, 630 square feet 
of newly remodeled open 
office space on Rtc. 137 just 
West of Rt. 21. 5630/month. 

Call 
(708) 816-6229 



ANTIOCH 

I Office (340 «q. ft,), garage I 

I with 2 large overhead doors! 

(2000 sq. ft) and outside | 

storage space available. 

I Leave message. 

838-4931 



560 



DEL RAY ESTATES 
WOODED LOTS FOR 
SALE. Win build to suit or own- 
ers completion, In Lake Marie 
area. (708) 403-1409. 



568 



Out Of Area Property 



NORTHERN Wl .- MINOC- 
QUA-3 ac. W/over 160' of 
frtg.. On large river. 119,950. 
Won't last) CABIN-Rustlc 
cedar shall w/1 1 + ac. Adjoin- 
ing fore at, approx. 1/4 mile of 
ttroam frtg.-Canoeabla. Only 
$79,9501 BOULDER JCT. - 
Last Wl wildemata w/200' + 
frtg. On sandy, private lake. 
Rare find! Finance with us. 
No paymants until March 15, 
1996. 

800-648-6933 
FOUR SEASONS REALTY 

Winter Sporla • ■ 14,650- 
Atpine woods surrounds this 
beautiful cabin she. Located 
next to Sky Line Ski Hill In 
Adams, Wl. this getaway 
offert 1 1 aki rum. 335* Ver- 
tical, Night Skiing, Snow- 
boarding and miles of snow- 
mobile Trails. This one will 
not last long!! 
1-800-335-2420 
Four Saaaona Realty 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Htm RatlraitMirt Community 

Opening 1094. Minutes from 
Raaaarcrtjriangto Park nr. Rak>*grv 
Durham, All levels of can. 
Independent 2br cottages & 1 & 2br 
apt Assisted LMng, SWIod NuTdrvj. 
Amertftes on ana. Col 1-600-552- 
021 3 a write Wlndncx PWnt P.O. Box 
1330, Fuauay-Varira, NC 27526. 



A FREE COLOR BROCHURE ol 
available lakefrant & view 
acreage & houses on huge 
lake near Knoxvltla & Smoky 
Mtna. Mild climate, tow 
taxes, exc. Terms. Incredible 
low pricee from only »6.900 
to 11 23.900. Call Indian 
Shadows 800-239-8323, ext 
6817. File #0-07214-48-08. 



COLORADO 

233.48 ac ranch, lush mtn 
valley, surrounded by Nat'l 
Forest. Chaffee Co. Main 
house, guest house. Big 
game country, 4 ac trout lake, 
§1.6 Million. Also, $2.2 Million 
Super 8 Motel In Salida, CO, 
Nr. skiing, hunting, white 
water rafting. Good Profits. 
Brochures avail. Century 21 
Was Hill & Associates. Ask tor 
Wes, 719-539-6616. 



568 



t^utorATcaPropcrt) 



MONTANA 
SWAN VALLEY 

1 060 sq. It. log home on 10.61 acs. 
(full Umo residence or vacation 
home) + adjacent 10.61 ac. parcel 
with well. Spectacular views ol 
Swan & Mission Mountains. 
WOOK. By Owner. (602) 706-1160 



INVESTORS 

131 Unit affordable housing 
Apartment Complex Monroe, 
Louisiana, $1,350,000. 

LATTER & BLUM, INC. 
REALTORS 

BUI Gremllllon 
(504) 295-0800 



TEXAS 

9300 ac, 45 mlns from San 
Antonio, adjoining Choke 
Canyon Lake, excellent hunt- 
ing, minerals, water rights, 
bldg's Included, $600 per ac. 
Call Puckett Ftanch Properties, 
512-573-9361 for Inlo7dotalls. 



ARIZONA, 
SCOTTSDALE 

Qalney Ranch, 2br luxury condo, 
$119,900. Also', 2br, + don, pool, 
security, tennis, golf, 1179,900, 
others avail. RENTALS AVAIL 
Comml lot, apts, traler pk, ear lot 
From $35K-J850K. Call Act, 602. 
922-9555 for details. 



IDAHO 
NORTH CENTRAL 

Spanish Stylo House (4000>sf), tow 
crime, no floods. Matching bam on 
6 acs. Beaut country, 5or & al the 
extras. Adj. to Clearwater, Salmon & 

Snake Rtvers. V325K. Cart 209-963- 
2411 or write: Oarrol Hoglan, Rt 2, 
Box 443, Qranosvlle, ID 63530. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake 
land Newspapers you may 
receive a misleading state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for this 

advertising. To receive prop- 
er credit to your account, 
all payment* for your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

l ia lril""* «*--- r -r"-- 
> '-• ro Box 388 - , 
' SO 0. Waaltasy 0C 
QrayaUke, a> 60QS0-0268 



All-roai estate advertising in 
this newspaper Is subject to 
the Fair Housing Act of 1968 
which makes it illegal to 
advertise any preference, 
limitation or discrimination 
based on race, color, 
religion, sex, handicap, 
familial' status or national 
origin, or an Intention- to 
make any' such preference, 
limitation or dscriminatioa 



aaasakassaaSS 



Want To Sell 

Your Vehicle Fist? 

Call Us* In Classified 

(708) 223-8161 
Ext. 140 



QBE 'SB B 




With Lakeland newspapers 9 
hard-hitting Classifieds! 

Use a slapshot to reach over 200,000 readers. 

Shoot from the point and get Into all 13 newspapers. 

Find the players you need for your lineup. 

Call your game-winning 

Classified Team at (708) 223-8161 

"We're So Good We Qon'tEven Use Helmets" 



j$ 



• . ' . . . ., . 



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< W i* H 




DtcEMbtn 1 5, 1 995 UkflANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




FourVhcdDrire 
• Jeeps 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



Cars for Sale 



SNOWMOBILE 1992 -PO- 
LARIS RXL 650, with ravoreo 
and studded track, low miles, 
excellent condition, $3,650. 
(414) 857-7721 evenings, 
(414)S57-76Z3daya. 

STREET ROD PROJECT 
1936 Plymouth 4-door sodan, 
Mustang II suspension, 318 
motor, automatic transmis- 
sion, extra 360 motor and 
transmission, Sl.OOO/llrm. 
Lambrotta motor scooter, 
5300. TriSport 3-whoelor, 
$300. (708) 740-0265 nltor 
5pm. 



708 



Soowmobilcs/ATVs 



1991 SKI DOO MACH 1X 
617cc. Dopendablo, fast run- 
ner. $3,700/best. 1986 Honda 
Fourtrax 250R with exlras. 
$1,6CKVbest.. (708) 049-0539 
days, ' • . . 

1992 POLARIS RXL 650, 
with reverse and studdod 
track, low miles, excellent con- 
dition, $3,650. (414) 
857-7673 days, (414) 857- 
7721 evenings. 

JUST ADD SNOW AWAY 
YOU QO! (2) Scorpion Ul' 
Whips, trailer and 4 helmets, 
recently rebuilt, excellent con- 
dition, runs great, must sell. 
$1,250 takes II all. (815) 
675-2907. 

SNOWMOBILE 1989 INDY 
650, studded track, pro-carbs. 
In excellent condition. 
$3.000ybest. (708) 548-O870. 

SNOWMOBILE 1991 INDY 
500 studs, clutch kit and ox- 
Iras, $2.800. (708) B72-8450. 

SNOWMOBILE 1994 

PHAZER, carbides, studs, 
cover, baggage, handwarm- 
ers, extras, 1,000 miles, ga- 
rage kept, $3,650. (708) 
872-0597, pagor 399-5600. 

WESTERN SNOWPLOW, 
unimount en.oin.^— 2yr».- 

'Wd. Good'corxfltfeh: $1,200. 

(706) 433^-2264 alter 5pm. 



720 



Sports Equipment 



EXERCISE EQUIPMENT 
(HEALTHMAX). Uke new. 
Paid $499. Asking 5175/best. 
(414)656-1644; -■ 

PRECOR S15e SKI • MA- 
CHINE, wilh heart monitor. 
$200. (708) 526-8539. 

SOLOFLEX WTTH LEG ma- 
chine, $700/besl. (708) 
740-3044. 



1970 CADILLAC 

SSOO/BEST. 1982 El Caml- 
. no, V6, $650*est. 1990 Ply- 
mouth Voyager, V6, $5,500. 
(708)546-1011. 

19B3 BMW 320I, 2-door, 
molatllc bokjo, wilh beige In- 
terior, sunroof, am/fm cas- 
setlo radio, $2,000 In new 
parts. Will run, but neods fin- 
ishing. 5850/best. (700) 
578-1918. - 

1985 MERCEDES 300D 

TURBO DIESEL 

Clean Inside/out. 

Silver with black leather. 

Power sunroof, power 

windows, healed seats, A/C, 

. new stereo cassette, new 

tires. Cellular phone. 

Garage kept. 

This car Is In showroom 

condition: A must see! 

$1O,900/bost. 

(708)587-4119. 

1992 CAMARO RS, au- 
tomatic, 305, V8, loaded, like 
new, $8,500/bost. 1079 Trans 
Am 350, V8, automatic. Runs 
good Si ,295. (708) 395-9069. 

1993 CAVALIER, AM/FM, 
air, automatic, power stoerlng, 
86,000 highway miles, 
$5,900/best. (708) 546-2316 
leave messag e! 

1994 GEO TRACKER 
HARD ,TOP. red, 21,000 
mites, 4-wheel drive, "excel- 
lent condition. Asking 
510,300/bosl. (708) 
263-6489. - 

BUICK PARK AVENUE 
1991 . Executive driven compa- 
ny car. Loaded, white with 
blue leathor -Interior, 86K 
miles. Good condition. 
$9,0007best. (708) 249-3494 
9am -5pm, Monday-Friday. 

BUICK REGAL 1982, with 
hydraulics, foot, back, side-to- 
slde, 3 wheel motion, new 
paint, new motor and new 
rims*. Asking $6,000, (708) 

244-0778. 

CADILLAC *T CONVERT- 
IBLE 1968, needs restoring, 
make an offer. (708)' 
567-0370. • 

CHEVY 305 OUT of a ,1984 
Z28. Runs good. $300/best. 
(414) 877-2207. 

CHEVY CAMARO Z-2B, 
1987, 71,000 mites, 5.7 liter 
• 350, red with T-tops, no rust, 
$4.500. (414) 697-Q762. 

CHEVY MALIBU 1976 sta- 
tion wagon, 350 V8, runs 
good, $550. (708) 336-0365 
call after 5pm. 



DODGE DAYTONA SHEL- 
BY Z 1088 wilh Turbo, vory 
ctoan. $3,200/best. (414) 
857-2756, 

EAGLE TALON DL 1993, 

loaded, oxceltent condition, 
low miles, original owner, 
$10,500/bost. (708) 

4 07-O5O1. ^^^ 

FORD T-BIRD 1985, V8, 
loaded, grey and silver. Needs 
partial exhaust. $1,200/bost. 
(708)336-2621. 

GRAND AM 1936, 4-door. 
automatic, power steering, 
AM/FM, now tires, 111.000K. 
$1,825.(708)459-1513. 

MAZDA 323, 1991, hatch- 
back, 5-speed. air condition- 
ing, AM/FM radio cassette, ex- 
cellent condition. New tires, 
battery and muffler. Runs 
great. Must see, $3,500. (708) 
336-9540. 

MERCURY COUGAR 

1987, V8, lull power, high, 
mileage, runs good, looks 
bad. Excellont work car. 
$1,400.(708)973-1425. 

MERCURY COUGAR 

1989, completely loaded, 
good mileage, great condition. 
$4,900.(708)566-9240. 

MERCURY MARQUIS 
1983 station wagon, runs 
great. S500/bosl. (708) 
587-2904. - 

MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE 
1992, 33K miles, excellent 
condition, fully loaded. Take 
over tease for lyr. or pur- 
chase tor $11,200. (815) 
344-5052. 

PLYMOUTH LASER 1990, 
5-speed, loaded, air condition- 
ing, sunroof, clean, teal color, 
runs great, very dependable, 
$4,500. (414) 537-4697 even- 
Ings. 

PONTtAC 1080 BONNE- 
VILLE SSE. ' Exc*rl*ni am* 
ison. eoK, . lMtr>er: Interior, 

moonroof. " 58.30O.r <708> 
259-7654. _;____ 

PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 

1983, B8.000 miles, runs 
good. 31.700. Cafl BIO (708) 
672-0902 leave message. 

RARE FIND 1977 AMC 
Matador, Blue, 4-door, 8-cy- 
nnder (3601) automatic, air, 
factory Installed AM/FM 8- 
track, low miles. Original. Ex- 
cellent body (could be a 'Zle- 
bart' testimonial). Seats cus- 
tom covered since new. 1-fam- 
Dy owned. Must sen. Best offer. 
(708)740-1384. 



PLYMOUTH LAZER 1990, 
16 valve, 4-cyDnder, turbo, 5- 
spoed, blue metallic, grey 
cloth Interior, powor windows, 
rear window wfpor, CD player, 
1Cln. wheels. $5,500/best. 
(708) 578-1918. 

TRIPLE CHARGER Plus Oil 
Charger provide honest 20% 
Increase In gas mileage, more 
powor, loss emissions. Can 
save you BIG money over the 
Ufo of your car. Rops urgently 
neodod. For FREE Video 
call (708)548-7437. Jerry. 

VW SCtROCCO 1980, 4-cy- 
iinder, 5-speed, reconi tune- 
up, $450/best. (708) 
578-1918. 



810 



ClaHlc/Aijtj que Cars 



CHEVROLET 1950, 2- 
DOOR, good hot rod materi- 
al; $B00/best. (708) 
546-0983. 

1977 AMC Matador, Blue, 
4-door. 8-cyDnder (360I) au- 
tomatic, air, factory Installed 
AM/FM 8-track, low miles. 
Original. Excellent body (could 
be a 'Zlebart' testimonial). 
Seals custom covered since 
new. 1 -family owned.. Runs 
great) Must sell. Asking 
$1,000*est. (708) 740-1384. 



814 



Senicc &FarIs 



CLASSIC QUARTER PANEL 
SALE. Muitang, Camaro, 
Nova, < Chavalle. . Cutlata, 
Mopart, Pontlae. Chevrotat, 
more! TRUNK PANS, FLOOR 
PANS. DOORS, FENDERS. 
BUMPERS. New and Califor- 
nia Rust Free. MARK'S 
PLATINO & -SUPPLY 217- 
824-6184. 



824 


Vans 



ASTRO VAN 1987 dark' red, 
mechanically excellent condi- 
tion. Too much lo Bstl V-6. S-. 
pa«M»noor. »lr. power 

brako«/mloorlno. tin. crulao. 
gauges, front disc. 33,000. 



rromy »«•- 



828 



Four Hied Drive 
Jeeps 



1091 JEEP CHEROKEE 
LTD., grey leather Interior, 
loaded. Excellent condition. 
86,000 miles. $12,000. (414) 
652-6422. - 

GMC SUBURBAN 4X4, 
1994, loaded, excellent condi- 
tion, Teal, 350. Asking 
$26,000. (414) 877-9127. 

'0 P 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



1993 CHEVY S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, loaded, 67.000 miles, 
4x4, $15,500. 1991 Grind 
Am, now paint, tires, exhaust 
and transmission, 

i 5,000/bo st. Both are red and 
4-door. (414) 763-0927, (414) 
763-2639, 



834 


Trucks/Trailers ' 



844 


Motorcycles 



834 


Tnidu/Trallers 



1976 IH FLEET Star 20-ton 
5/yard dump truck, IH Vfl gas 
engino, 5/speed automatic on 
Bonnell Modol #435 11 it. 
hydro tum revorsiblo snow- 
plow and hydraulic salt 
spreader. (815) 675-2383. 

1987 CHEVY S-10 shoribed 
pickup, 4-speod,. 4-cyllnder, 
new tires, baflery, American 
racing rims, many new parts, 
runs very good. $3,300A>est. 
(708) 438-0975. 

1994 FORD F-150, XLT In- 
terior, XL extorior, extended 
cab, long bed with cap, Mack. 
$16.500. (708) 872-8450. 

DODGE 1984 MINI RAM, 
4x4 l 4-speed, new brakes, de- 
pendable. S2,000/tx>st. (414) 
652-8277. _^ 

DODGE RAM 150, 1991. V- 
8, 4-speed, power steer- 
ing/brakes, windows/mirrors 
and locks, air, Hit, cruise, 
am/Tm cassette, sliding' rear 
windows, low mileage. 
$8.000*est. (414) 763-6407. 



DODGE TRUCK 1954. 
Good shape. Moods engine 
Work. $900. (708) 740-0012. 

FORD 1/2 TON PICKUP 
1966, automatic, strong 390 
onglno, very dependable. Ask- 
Ing $1,500. (414) 604-6290. 

GMC 1981 1/2 ton pickup, 
V8, rebuilt automatic transmis- 
sion, many now parts, runs 
good, cap. $1,5O0/best. (414) 
857-7197. 

RUST FREE 3/4 ton pickup. 
Power steering, new power 
brakes, auto, groat heal, Al- 
pine putloul stereo, 1,600b. 
aluminum rack, bodOner, tool 
box. $2.000/bosl. (708) 
483-8414. 



N1NJA 250 MOTORCY- 
CLE, 1993. $2.300/bost. 
(414)877-9401. 



844 


Motorcydcs 



1982 HONDA V-45 

MAGNA 

Good condition. 

Garage kept. 

Sl^OObost. 

(815) 303-9496. 

1995 HONDA GOLDWING 

ASPENCADE, low mBes, many 
oxlras. $li,905/best. Call 
after 5pm or leave message 
(708) 356-3747. 

MOTORCYCLE 1990 Kaw 
Nlnji ZX10, low miles, good 
condiHon.'runs sweet wilh cov- 
er. $3,300/besl. (708) 
265-1504 altor4pm. 



• Need lo Sell a Cat? 

•Sent Your House? 

• Sell A Goat? 

•AfkrtiseYoor 
Garage Sale? 

(You Gel The Idea) 

Call Lisa at 




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IB I 

JMH 
BUILDERS 

CUSTOM HOMES • 
REMODELING • DECKS 

(708) 740-1979 

JOHN M. HOELDTSR, 




f ^nVtil^M.^ pto^^tM&lM 



Precise 



Fall 
Special 



PatotlngV 30% OFF 

All Labor 

Interior/Exterior 

New Construction, or we 

can make it look like new 

CALL (708) 546-2860 

Htt (7081 395-0490 




iiUiiHUiiU 



CW LANDSCAPE CO. INC 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS & CONTRACTORS 
Serving Lab County Since I960 
•Computer Design 'Seeding 
•Flagstone Patios "Sodding 
•Stone Walls •Planting 

•Texture Gardens 'Grading 

(708) 746-8953 



1* 

A 
A. 
A 
A 
A 
A 
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AiiAAAAiAAii AA 




■3 



4STXCI35SSSSSS' 

Dependable 

Swimming 
Pool & Spa 

Above-Ground Pools, Spas, 
Chemical^ Equipment & Accessories £ 
Complete Maintenance & Service 

Visit Our Showroom Anytime!! 

124 S. Route 83 
Grayslake, IL 

223-1606 




LJ 

ZZZO& 



DONT THROW AWAY\ 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR%$ 
LAMP DOCTORS^ 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIcTnC. 
33261 N. Highway 45 
Wildwood, IL 60030 

(708)223-8691 



WX SOD FARM 

#1 Kentucky Bluegrass 
Blended Sod 

Peat or Mineral 

Forkllfl Delivered 

Phone: (414) 895-2725 



^ 




JLaursen & 

W$LACKMAN<b. 



Window & Door Replacement 

Service You Can Trust 
Strength 
You Can 

Depend Oni^s ^08)838-5300 



SMITH 

Spray-Brush & Roll 



WATERSEAL 
PAINT - STAIN 



Siding, Itim. wood, diywoll block. 

slucco, concrelo. 

We hove the expcilencc and the equlpmeni 

to do Ihc Job fight. . 

Fioo Esfimalos Reasonable Rates 

(708) 244-2202 ASK FOR MEL 




PETER J. 

SVARAS 
ROOFING 

RESIDENTIAL ROOFING 

CONTRACTOR 
ISLAND LAKE. ILLINOIS » 

(708} $2b*2304 

WAX (70*7 526-3304 

(serving Northern llllnol* 

mnd Southosatarn Wisconsin) 

•Rcroofing * Removal, Disposal and 

Replacement "All T>pc8 Cedar Shake/ 

Cedar Shingle •Modified Bitumen Flat 

RooQitg Systems * Skylight installation 

and/or replacement •Quality leak 

repairs with guaranteed results 

•Chimney counter flashing 

(exit Into mortar Joints) 

All roofs hand nailed (no air tools art used) 

Prompt and Efficient Service 

We deal with quality, not quantity. Whether 

it is one shingle to be replaced or an entire 

roof, your call is Important to us! 

. Call today for free estimate 

Star* Ucmntod • Fully insured 

m * Rooting Contractor 

emtrgoncy Repelr Services 

We accept? 




Over 40 years of 
"""crsonal service 



dock 



onst ruction inc. 



• custom homes 

• design services 

• additions 



• basements 

• remodeling 
kitchens 
baths 

fully insured - 526-1500 

free estimates Wauconda 

General Contractors 



| SPARKLE i 

| CLEANING | 

3g All English-Speaking Women ^ 

|K • Residential •Business * 

$ »Move In - Move Out |£ 

9K Fully Insured - Bonded ¥fc 

$ * Satisfaction Guaranteed * | 
* (708) 680- 1146* 



Jk4 A* A* A* Jk* A 

4 JAV'S HANDYMAN * 

* SERVICES A 

* 'Alt Types of Home Repairs, 4 

jl Clcm-Vps 3ncl Improvements' £ 

£ Christmas Decorations £ 

Put up or take down » 

* Fix it, Patch it, Paint it ? 

* 7b Get It Done! 

& With Insured Workmen * 

* 708-526-6364 * 



JACK'S 
REMODELING 

BASEMENTS 

Dormers • Siding • Soffit 
Windows • Decks • Bathrooms 

FREE ESTIMATES 
plus references 

CALL JACK AT 
(708)546-3759 



1 



G.S.i Service 

Carpentry • Electrical 
Plumbing 

All phases of home 
remodeling & repair 

FREE ESTIMATES 

1703) 537-0937 



tft\if?^^00FM 

f SiDINGrS^RIM- 
SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

Licensed I I WINDOWS vDQQRS 
Insured I -DECKS * A\*/NWGS 
free rReji^riinsutoceWork 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



Estimates 



f)V V From $29 ^CU 

NO ATTORNEYS* FAST, SIMPLE, NO WAITING * 

BUSINESS PLANS - RESUMES AND MORE 
CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SERVICES OFFERED 

WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 

(708) 548-1300 



FAMILY TREE 
SERVICE 

Tree & 

Stamp 

Removal 



No Job too big 

erimall 



(708) 643-9857 



OINO'S 1 
DECORATING 

Painting & Staining 
Call New .-'•;.'.„ 
Free Estimates ; 
Affordable Rates 
ip; Fully Insured 
Qual ity Work with 
Written Guarantee 

(70i) 516-2107 



Impress 

your friends Be, 

family by awarding 

the opportunity to 

deep clean your 

carpets and 

upholstery for the 

HOLIDAYS! 

Call now and avoid 

last minute delays 

and receive our 

special rata of 

.18* a iq. ft. 'till Jan 2, 1996 

For Our Own Unique 
9 STEP CLEANING PROCESS 

9 CALL NOW! 

1 [1001 739-1200 
10011247-1100 

e-mail prislinc@lnd.com 
AVAILABLE SUNDAYS! 



•** LOW RATES ••• 

HEANEyS INSIDE 
RV STORAGE 

$12.00 per ft. 20' or under 
$13. 00 per ft. 21' or over* 

*AJ so appliei to Trailer* 4 Motor Home* 

Cars - Popups $35 per mo. 

■Storage Available on other RV.'* 

(708) 587-9100 



■(Emnpuier Js£er£rtcss! 
<Axxtiz 

Consulting-lbtoring-Training 

•Word Processing # Data Basej 
•Spreadsheet *FUe Transfers 

Clip & Save Por That Christmas Present j 

OFFICE CAR 

(708) 662-1606 (708) 822-8580 



>o 



UJ 



j* 




Roofing 

Residential/Commercial 
Roofing and Siding . 
1-800-283-6964 

•Reroofc • Roof Tearoffs 

• Shingled Roofs • 

Cedar Shake Roofe 

We specialize in flat roofing. 

Skylight repairs and 

replacement 24-hr. repair 

service, 1 0-year labor warranty. 

30 years in the community. 

FOR A HOW IN YOUR R00P 

OR A WHOLE NEWR00F 

Call Today For Free Estimate 

FlLUf INSURED EMERGBNCY 

REPAIR SERVICE 

INTEREST-FREE FINANCING 



5SS 



PRO DECORATING 



RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL 




•5 

OFF 



OFF J 

ountfl 

ousc ourn* 
JSHHSSHl^S^SL 



*2d 

OFF 



-GUTTERS: Ropalr/Rephce/cfean 

(708) 886-8365 

Onfc iho FINEST WORKHANSMP, Wo Kite only the 
HIGHEST QUALITY points. FREE ESTIMATES • Futy 

Insured. We Wl Beat ANY Witlen Estimate. Boom 
Service Avabtfe. References Ara labia Upon Request. 

25% OFF Painting • Staining 

Ihnj 12-29-95 with this coupon 



Problems? 



Professional Solutions 
Reasonable Prices 

Call 

HeatWave 

JtVLU 

AND SERVICE 



E.P.A. Certified-Insured 
Free Est.-Senior Dis. 

740-4127 

Subsidiary of 
Five Star Rest Serv., Corp. 



^llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIKlLh] 

George's 
Decorating 

Paint & Wallpaper 
Interior & Exterior 
General Repairs 
y Quality Work 
pf Reasonable Rates 
*-/. Fully Insured 

Free Estimates • 
Written Guarantee 

10% OFF with this ad 
(708) 548-5110 

■niinHiiimiinimnniiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiimiiiiiiimimiiir; 




^ Lazan€r*s\ 

k Heaiing &CoouNG^ 

J Appliance Sales & Service ^ 
J Also Available. ■ 

1 Call For Prices & Estimate k 

>|414) 862-2396 > 



RECYCLE! 

Cosh For 

•Aluminum .Cons 

•All Other Scrap Metals 

Industrial Accounts Welcome 

Chicago Surplus 

11304 260th Avenue 
Trevor, Wl ' 



Price Subject To Chang* 

LOCATION: Trevor Wl (5 minutes 
North ol Antiochl Take Hwy C one 
mile wesi ol -Route 83 Turn North on 
259th St Veer lo left for 2 blocks (next 
to Foxy's' Tavern) 

Mon. - Frl. 8:30 am - 5 pm 
Saturday 8:30 am - 3:30 pm 

(414) 862-2517 




' /contractors ELECTRIC SEWlCElcr 

/ ELECTRIGAL CONTRACTOR^ 
/ "Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 

33265 N.Rte. 45 

Wildwoocl, ILL 60030 

(708) 223-4682 

RESIDENTI AL - COMMERCIAL 




AREA RUGS FROM 
YOUR SCRAP CARPET! 

CARPET BINDING 
FRINGING 
REPAIRS 

I COMPLETE CUSTOM RUG SERVICES 

CUSTOM BINDING SERVICE 

708-566-6734 

PICKUP & DELIVERY AVAILABLE ! 



COMPUTE 
DECORATING SERVICE 

f Call Does H AIM! 

Exterior/Interior Painting 

and Wall Papering 

Remodeling 

•Bathrooms •Basements 

•Kitchens *Rec Rooms 

Deck Construction/Maintenance - 

All Home Repairs with licensed 

Electrician/Plumber 
Insured, Free Estimates, Senior Dlicountt 

(708) 977-0445 



ALUMINUMS 
VINYL SIDING 

VINYL REPLACEMENT 

WINDOWS 

Soffil & Fascia 

Window Trim - References 

Work Guaranteed 

Insured - Free Estimates 

^ 26 yrs. Experience . ' 

I EAGLE SIDING CO. 
(708) 526-7222 



m 



m 



BUYING 

Aluminum Cans 



i 



V0TEL COMMUNICATIONS 

Let lh Carry Your Voice - local & Long Distance 

bice Mail with unlimited options: 

•Unlimited Calling - Flat Fee Rates 
• Call Forwarding 
•Group Messaging 
•Certified Messages 
•800 Service 




• ONE MONTH FREE * 



Pagers Available 




Customized solutions to your business needs 



♦COPPER *BRASS 
*AUTO RADIATORS 
*LEAD 'ALUMINUM 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-0788 

-or^ 

1000 Rand Rd (Rt. 12), Unit 212 

Wauconda, IL 

(708)526-0760 

HOURS: 

Mon.-Frl. 

9 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 

Closed 12-12:30 

— — n 




■I. 

^J 



■:«; 



% ** m i ■ i m .yr—ln+V'*'?™ 









-4^***V~^*^t,*imt*»M&tt**rlr*i)?T*1*\,'- ■ ' '-• ., 



Ptctubem IS, my UIceUncj NwspApas SPORTS/LEISURE 



Pcccnb c« 1 5, 199? UlctUwd Newspapers SPORTS/LEIS URE | JH 

Lake County men find national gridiron dory in Racine 

DANIEL PAMAOC w__ii_ . »,__.,.. *-* O^ V 



DANIEL RAMAGE 
Sporls Editor 

When one thinks of "Wisconsin" 
and "football," Green Bay or the 
University of Wisconsin's Big Ten 
team immediately come to mind. 
Two Lake County men, however, 
have helped shift the focus of foot- 
ball fame to Racine. 

Kurt Kampendahl and Michael 
Baldwin, respectively the head 
coach and comcrbackof the Racine 
Raiders, played key roles in bring- 
ing the Minor League Semi-Pro 
Football national championship to 
the Midwest The Raiders posted a 
17-1 mark this season en route to 
winning the Super Bowl of the 
minor leagues. 

The Raiders traveled to 



Marlborough, Mass., for the game 
against defending champs the 
Marlborough Shamrocks. Tho 
Raiders snapped the Shamrocks' 
28 -game winning streak with a 1 6-6 
victory in the tide tilt It was the 
sixth national championship in the 
team's history. 

Kampendahl, of Antioch, Is no 
stranger to gridiron glory. He began 
his career with the Lake County 
Rifles in 1972, and In 22 seasons 
never played for or coached a team 
that posted a losing record. All told, 
the five teams for which he played 
won seven national championships 
and 17 league championships. 

The coach has received a myriad 
of individual honors as well. As a 
defensive tackle, in 1976 and 1977 



he was named first-team All 
American; also in 1976, he was hon- 
ored as the League MVP and 
Defensive Player of the Yean from 
1973 through 1989, he was a first- 
team All-League designee; In 1988, 
he became the first active player 
enshrined in the American Football 
Association's Minor League Hall of 
Fame, and was elected to the 
Midwest Football League's Hall of 
Fame. When he retired as a player 
In 1993 at the age of 44, the Raiders 
retired his number. 

This year, Kampendahl was 
named a charter member of the 
new United States Football 
Association Hall of Fame. 

After his retirement, Kampendahl 
accepted a head coaching position 



with the Lake County Vikings. From 
there he went to Racine as defen- 
sive line coach, but when the head 
coach retired, Kampendahl got the 
nod 

"It was a dream come true," said 
Kampendahl. "I had hoped when I 
got into coaching that I could 
become head coach here In Radnc. 
And then, to go and win the nation- 
al championship In the first season 
is the ultimate. I couldn't have 
asked for anything better." 

Baldwin, of Park City, saw the 
championship from the player's 
perspective. The defensive stalwart 
was a standout at Illinois State 
University. He began his post-col- 
lege career with the Lake County 
Vikings in 1994, but went to Racine 



the following season. 

His presence was felt immediate- 
ly, and he earned the starting cor- 
nerback position on the nation's 
top-ranked defensive squad. 

"Michael provided as with the 
ability to play more than man-to- 
man coverage on defense," said 
Kampendahl "That allowed us to 
blitz our linebackers more often. 
He-was almost always assigned 
to cover the opponent's best 
receiver, game after game, and 
he did an, excellent Job there all 
season." 

Both Kampendahl and Baldwin 
will now take some time to savor 
the team's success before begin- 
ning preparations to defend the 
titic. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



THIS WEEK 

Team leap frog 

Dan Raraage on the 
NFL's new sport 
PAGE CI 9 

Prep action 

Team round-ups 
PAGE All 

SIU swimmer 
proves mother 

knows best 

DANIEL RAMAGE 
Sports Editor 

You often hear children 
complain "My mother made - 
me do It" What you almost 
never hear is Tm glad she 
made me." 

But that is just how 
Southern Illinois University 
swimmer PrisciUa Louis, a 
1993 graduate of Warren 
Township High School, 
decribes how she came to 
•be a competitive swimmer. 
Mother knows best, appar- 
ently. 

' . Louis recently won All 
Missouri Valley Conference 
honors after reaching the 
finals of the MVG meet She 
was a finalist In trie 50-yard 
freestyle and the 100-yard^ ■;• 
freestyle, but her crowning 
glory was an MVC champi- 
onship in the 200-yeard 
freestyle relay. 
<yVnie SIU sophomore 
came to the competitive 
aspect of the sport surpris- 
inigly late In life. 

"I started swlrrmiing 
competitively my ; freshman 
year in high school," said 
Louis. "My mom made me, 
and I'm really happy she 
made me swim." 

Louis's mother, Priscllla 
Duffy, began teaching her 
daughter to swim before she 
iyas two years old. After see- 
ing how accomplished her 
daughter became in the 
See SWIMMER page C20 



Crowd battles weather to meet Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 



DANIEL RAMAGE 
Sports Editor 

Enticing several hundred peo- 
ple to drive through a blizzard so 
they can stand in line a few hours 
for an autograph is a tall order. 
Then again, at 7-2 Kareem Abdul- 
Jabbar is a tall man. 

The NBA's all-time leading 
scorer made an appearance at the 
MC Sports store in Round Lake 
Beach to promote that chain's 
Teammates" program, and 
dcsplta deplorable weather, con- 
ations the fans of the Hall of 
Fame center turned out In 
droves. 

This Is a dream come true for 
me," said BUI Polchick of Antioch. 
"I've loved Kareem since I was a 
little kid. Now to meet him, well, 
it's a little overwhelming." 

Polchlk's words were echoed - 
by nearly everyone in the crowd, 
estimated to be near 800 people. 
So great was the anticipation of 
meeting the basketball legend 
that fans began lining up at 3:30 
for the 6:30 appearance. 

Autographs aside, Abdul- 
Jabbar made the visit to pro- 
mote a program he feels strong- 
ly about. MC Sports 
"Teammates" program provides 
sports equipment free of charge 
to schools, church groups and 
other organizations. Abdul- 
Jabbar benefited from athletics 
as a youngster, and he is eager 
to see those benefits extended 
to another generation. 

"It's (the Teammates program) 
to keep the whole American tra- 
dition of sports alive," said 




Hakoom Mshatoto, 13. of Grayslak©, watts patiently white NBA log©nd Karoom Abdul-Jabbar auto- 
graphs a basketball for him. Tho Hall of Famo contoi's visit to a Round Lako Boach sporting goods 
storo drow noarty 800 pooplo.— Photo by Danlol Ramago 



Abdul-Jabbar. "Different fiscal 
crises have really negatively 
impacted sports in a dispropor- 
tionate way. It seems like every 
time the crunch happens the first 
thing they want to eliminate is 
sports. 

. "They've been out of the grade 
schools for awhile, and church 
leagues, what have you, because 



of funding they can't have the 
leagues for kids. I think MC 
Sports ... is giving these programs 
a chance to stay afloat" 

By collecting MC Sports 
receipts, organizations involved 
in the program earn points 
toward free equipment. What 
equipment the beneficiaries 
receive is up to them. 



"My friends at MC Sports are 
meeting the challenge — giving 
back to the community and mak- 
ing a difference. I'm proud to be a 
part of this effort," said Abdul- 
Jabbar. 

For more information about 
the Teammates program, visit 
MC Sports or call (800) 626-1762, 
extension 287. 



NBA great, or NBA's greatest? Numbers speak for Jabbar 



DANIEL RAMAGE [ 

Sports Editor 

The response to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's visit to the MC Sports store 
in Round Lake Beach underscored Abdul-Jabbar's status as a living leg- 
end. When nearly 800 people brave near-blizzard conditions for an 
autograph, you know the man they came to see is more than just a bas- 
ketball player. 

Exactly how great is Abdul-Jabbar? The numbers speak for them- 

selves. 

• He was the first NBA player ever to score more than 37,000 points 
in his career. His regular season total of 37,639 points over 1,815 games 
is the most in NBA history. He is also the all-time playoff scoring leader 
5,762 points in 18 playoffs. 

• He Is the only player In NBA history to win the league MVP award 
six times (in 1971, 72, 74, 76, 77 and 79). 

• He is one of only 15 players to win. NBA championships with two 
franchises, the Milwaukee Bucks and the Los Angeles Lakers. 

• He made 17 trips to the All Star Game, was named All-NBA first 



team 10 times and All-Defensive Team 1 1 times, five on the first team. 

• He leads the NBA in career rebounds and free throws. 

• He was named Rookie of the Year in 1969, and was the top draft 

pick. 

• In college, UCLA posted an incredible 88-2 record with him on the 
team. He is the only player named Outstanding Player of the NCAA 
tournament three times, and his NCAA record is an unblemished 12-0. 
UCLA won three national titles with Abdul-Jabbar, who then was 
known as LewAlcindor. 

In addition, Abdul-Jabbar has won several season scoring titles and 
NBA playoff MVP awards. 

The stalwart center's talents are not confined to the basketball court, 
however. He is active in motion pictures, both as an actor and produc- 
er. He is active In youth advocacy programs and literacy programs. 

There is so much more, but space limitations prevent a complete 
listing of all his on- and off-court accomplishments. 

During his visit, Lakeland Newspapers was given an opportunity to 
Sec GREATEST page C20 



-9 







3 SPORTS/LEISURE UIceIancI Np«p»pERs OtctMben IS, 199$ 



fli- 



Swimmer 



From page CI 9 

water, Dully pushed tlic issue. She knew what she was talking about 

Ijouis swam on the WTHS varsity her freshman year, and improved 
steadily throughout her prep career. She also participated in tlic Like 
Forest summer swimming program. Still, when it came time for college, 
once again it was her mother who kept her in the pool. 

"When I was a senior, my mom was sending out my college applica- 
tions and she marked down on them that I swam," said I amis. The 
coaches got ahold of it somehow, they sent me a form and I filled it out 
Then the assistant coach called me and said they were interested." 

It was a leap of faith for Louis. She was not offered a scholarship right 
away, despite the fact that the sport takes up five hours of her day in prac- 
tice. She was told that if her times improved, she might l>c able to win a 
scholarship. 

I ler times did improve, and she expects to i>e on scholarship next year. 
To Louis, however, the financial assistance isn't of utmost importance. 
She relishes the competition most of all. 

"I find it very different, a lot more challenging," said Louis. "I really 
enjoy swiiming with people of this caliber." 

l«uis has established goals, and while she is not boastful of her talents, 
she docs dare to dream. 

"This (tlic MVC meet) Ls just one meet In February we have tlic 
National Independent Championships, and if you go fast enough, you 
can make the Junior Nationals or the NCAA meet," said Ijouis. "At this 
moment my times aren't there, but by my senior year I think I can make 
tlic cut" 

One gets tlic impression she will make the cut, because she has all the 
tools — natural ability, a sterling work ethic, and a mother who made her 
doit 



-Dan RAMAqE — — 

The NFL shuns football for a 
new sport — team leap frog 



Los Angeles Is now St. Louis, a 
wide open town since St. Ixitiis 
relocated to Phoenix. Cleveland 
is headed for Baltimore, which is 
now Indianapolis, but Cincinnati 
may be headed for Cleveland to 
take it's place. Chicago may still 
be Chicago, but it may soon be 
located in Indiana, like the New 
Yorkers that inhabit New Jersey, 
or the Detroit team in Pontiac. 

At least Oakland is Oakland 
again, now that it is no longer 
LA., but the fact remains that 
NFL players arc quickly becom- 
ing the best-paid migrant work- 
ers in history. 

Now, I'm as big a capitalist as 
anyone you'll ever meet, but this 



current trend smacks of greed now McCaskcy Is considering 
beyond the realm of good taste, moving the, team to Gary, 
For example, Cleveland Browns Indiana, that smoggy patch 
owner Art Modell claims moving across the lake that is best known 
his team to Baltimore is neccs- for having the highest per capita 
sary to insure his family's finan- murder rate in the country. 

McCaskcy is woefully out of 
touch. This country has made its 
displeasure with welfare cheats 
very clear, yet this spoiled multi- 
millionaire wants to be suckled at 
the public teat. Ills proposal 
would not only cost football fans, 
but others who do not enjoy the 
game. 

The trend of owners demand- 
woman who wanted the city of mg new stadhimsand other pub- 
Los Angeles to guarantee her lie perks has less to do with the* 
profit margin to keep the team condition of the current facilities 



cial future, as though the family 
of a man with enough juice to 
own an NFL franchise is ever 
going to be thirsty. 

Then there's Rams owner 
Georgia Fronticri, who called the 
NFL's bill for $30 million to allow 
her to move to St. Louis "extor- 
tion." She was absolutely right, 
but that sum is poetic justice for a 



Greatest 



From page CI 9 

interview Abdul-Jabbar. Questions ranged from 
the serious to just curious, but the soft-spoken 
legend answered them all. 

These arc his thoughts on: 

Most meaningful championship: "That was 
probably the '85 championship. It was the whole 
history of frustration for the Lakers as a franchise, 
for IjOS Angeles as a city, and for me personally. 
We'd never beaten the Celtics for a world champi- 
onship, so when that happened it was something 
very meaningful." 

Toughest defender: "Nate Thurmond." He did- 
n't even pause to think about this one. ' 

Why UCLA coach John Wooden never went to 
■ ■ • 



the NBA: "I think that's because he didn't desire 
the job. If he'd desired it, I'm sure he would have 
gotten the chance someplace." 

On discrimination against seven-foot Islamic 
black men: "It's something that isn't always 
pleasant, but it builds character." Abdul-Jabbar 
has been described as a minority of one. 

Plans for coaching: "None at present, but it's 
not something I've ruled out." 

Weirdest autographs: "Yesterday I had a first — 

1 signed a brick from the old Chicago Stadium. 

People have had me sign golf balls, and women 

have asked mc to sign various parts of their 

underclothes." 



there, rather than spend the 
money Fighting the scores of seri- 
ous problems found in that 
Sodom by the Sea. 

The worst of the lot, unfortu- 
nately, is close to home. 
Bears owner Michael McCaskcy 



or lack of profit than it docs with 
seat licenses and luxury sky 
boxes, all guaranteed to further 
line the owners' pockets. . 

As if ticket prices weren't outra- 
geous enough, pro franchise own- 
ers — in baseball, basketball and 



wanted the taxpayers of this state hockey, as well as football — want 

to ignore their responsibilities to new and better ways to gouge the 

education,, crime prevention, fans. And if they don't get their 

infrastructure improvement and way, it is now dear, the owners will 

other pesky little problems and take the teams away from the very 

underwrite the the bill for a new people who gave them a profit 

stadium. When that dog wouldn't margin in the First place, 

hunt, he wanted the city of There's only one town in exls- 

Chicago to guarantee him a $26 tence that can hold these people 

million annual profit. in place. Hie odd about it is that 

Mayor Richard Daley scoffed at Fat City doesn't even have a sta- 

such a preposterous notion, so dium. 





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DtcfMben 15, 1995 LaIceIancI Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



m 



Survey shows economy to remain healthy 



The' U.S. economy is healthy and should 
remain so for the foreseeable future accord- 
ing to a nationwide survey of small business 
owners and managers. 

The survey was conducted by 
Comprehensive Business Services, Inc., a 
network of more tan 200 franchiscd 
accounting practices providing tax, 
accounting, bookkeeping and other finan- 
cial services to over 21,000 small and medi- 
um stood businesses in the United States. 

Comprehensive' 1 sponsored the survey 
because it believes that small business rep- 
resents the backbone of the U.S. economy 
and that the views of small business owners 
and managers arc'an important bellwether 
of social, business, and economic develop- 
ments in (he months ahead. 

The national survey, taken by..tclephonc 
with some 400 small business owners and 



managers by C&R Research, an independent 
Chicago-based research firm, showed that 
almost half of the small business community 
expects the U.S. economy to remaln'the same 
while another 30 percent expect it to improve. 

Small business owners and managers 
also expressed opinions about the U.S. bud- 
get deficit, interest rates, the stock market, 
inflation, their own financial security, and 
prospects for profit in the 1 2 months ahead. 

In addition to having positive feelings 
about the U.S. economy, small business 
owners arc even more optimistic about the 
economy in their home state. Almost half 
expect it to remain the same, while another 
40 percent expect it to improve. 

Attesting to the eternal optimism of the 
entrepreneur, small business owners and 
managers feel good about their own future. 
Almost 90 percent expect their financial 



security to stay the same or improve. • 

Despite the risks and hazards of running a 
small business, the nation's entrepreneurs 
appear to be in good shape, at least financial- 
ly. The great majority— 01 percent— of small 
business owners and managers Interviewed 
said their businesses made a profit last year 
and of the years they had been in business, 
they were profitable two thirds of the time. 

Small business owners also feci good about 
the future. The majority of survey respon- 
dents expect their profits to increase for 1995 
in comparison to 1994 and they estimate that 
this increase will average 19 percent 

Despite these positive feelings, almost 
half of the small business owners and man- 
agers interviewed rated the U.S. business cli- 
mate as "discouraging" to the small business 
community, indicating once again that run- 
ning a small business is hard, at least in the 



opinion of those who are doing- it on a day- 
to-day basis. Approximately one fourth rated 
the U.S. business climate as "neutral" to the 
small business community and another one 
fourth said It was "encouraging." 

The great American Dream of succeed- 
ing by owning your own business appears 
to be borne out by this survey but it is at 
some cost to the owner's personal life. The 
majority of small business owners are mak- 
ing more money than before they went into 
business for themselves but as can be 
expected, they have less free time. 

Most are boosters of being in business 
for themselves with 70 percent responding 
that they would recommend going into 
business to their children, relatives, or 
friends. An overwhelming majority— 93 per- 
cent — say they arc planning to say in busi- 
ness for themselves. 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE fetes-* 

Shopping oasis offers a holiday break 



THIS WEEK 

Economic 
analysis 

Annual review keeps 
financial statement 
healthy PAGE €2 

Abbott delivers 

Shareholders can 

expect quarterly 
dividend PAGE C2 

Job outlook 

Survey results predict 
bleak future PAGE C? 

Whereto 
worship 

Area churches welcome 
one and all PAGE C8 

Last minute list? 

. Check gift spotter 
for ideas.. PAGE CIO 

STOCK WATCH 

Company Price Change Div. 
Abbott 411/2 +1 1/8 $0.84 
Allstate 397/8 -1 1/4 $0.78 
Amerltech 58 3/8 +2 1/4 $2.00 
AT&T 66 1/4 -7/8 51.32 
Baxter 411/4 -3/4 $1.73 
Brunswick 22 +1/2 . $0.50 
Unicom 315/8 -5/8 $1.60 
D. Witter 51 1/4 -1/8 $0.64 
Kemper : 49 3/8' +1/8 $0.92 
McDonalds 46 1/8 +3/4 $0.27 
Motorola 61 1/2 +3/4 $0.40. 
Peoples En. 31 1/4 +1/8 $1.80 
Qkr. Oats 37 1/8 +1 3/4. $1.14 
Saral.ee 33 .— $0.68 

Sears 39 +1/8 S0.92 

UAL ... 2051/4-2 5/8 $0.00 
Walgrccns 29 3/4 -5/8 $0.39 
WMX Tech. 30 3/4 +3/4 $0.60 
Cherry Elec. 9 7/B -1/4 $0.00 
Brwn. Ferris 30 3/4 -1/4 $0.68 

Amerltech stock rose on 
talk of a partnership with the 
Belgian government to provide 
phone service. 

Stock Watch provided by 
Noah Seidenberg of Edward D. 
Jones & Co., Grayslake. 



SUAE REED 

Staff Reporter . 

Tired feet, aching arms and 
wading through an endless list 
can try the patience of even the 
most ardent shopper. One mall 
has the answer, a place where 
shoppers can get a few minutes of 
TLC and some tips on how to 
make the holiday season a bit less 
stressful: The Relaxation Station 
at Gurnec.Mills. 

Located in the middle of the, 
Grange Hall halfway from either 
end of the mall, the area offers a 
temporary respite from the hustle 
and bustle of holiday shopping. 
According to Brenda Kinney, 
director of marketing at Gurncc 
Mills, the Relaxation Station is a 
unique service provided nowhere 
else. 

"About eight months ago, we 
looked at what customers were 
telling us, that they really got 
tired and needed a place to relax 
and be pampered," she said. "We 
decided we'd really like to do 
that" 

Although there arc numerous 
seating areas strategically placed 
along the length of the huge mall, 
the Relaxation Station gives tired 
shoppers some extra special ser- 
vices. Relaxing Christmas music 
from a player piano is one of the 



more interesting and innovative 
ideas they have come up with, 
she said. 

The biggest attraction, though, 
is the group of chairs from 
Sharper [mage. For five minutes a 
shopper can enjoy a full body 
massage. A computerized remote 
control sends relaxing waves to 
any area from head to toe, 

"It's .fun to sec people's reac- 



tions," said Kinney. "Their facial 
expressions arc just p ricelcss! " 

Four concierges have been 
hired to guide shoppers in their 
•quest for relaxation. In addition 
to the chairs, a number of other 
products are on display from 
Sharper Image and Bed, Bath and 
Beyond. Tables offer everything 
from Shiastu, a Japanese neck 
massage, to a hand held model 



for the lower back, and a contrap- 
tion that goes around the head to 
massage the cheeks. Demon- 
strations include massaging 
lotions and aromatherapy beads. 
Foot massage rs are one of the 
most popular items, she said. 

Between 25 and 30 people can 
enjoy the Relaxation Station at a 
time. When it opened Nov. 24, 
Sec BREAK page C3 




Chris Schwagerman from McHenry takes a moment to relax while Tracy Smrha from the Relaxation 
Station helps adjust the knobs and dials for the much needed five minutes of peace and quiet.— 
Photo by Linda Chapman 

Pastry chef takes over familiar Fox Lake bakery 




Rebecca and Steve Doerner, the new owners of the Black Forest 
Bakery In Fox Lake show off one of their special gingerbread ere- 
atlons for the holidays. The bakery has a European flair, said 
Doerner. similar to his parent's former bakery In Chlcago.-Photo 
by Tina L. Swlech 



Steve Doerner has been bak- 
ing up breads and cakes for near- 
ly four decades. Now he's the 
new owner of a long-standing 
bakery in Fox Lake— Black Forest 
at27E. Grand Ave. 

Doerner and his wife Rebecca 
have been working their magic 
creating European-style dclec- 
tablcs at Black Forest since 
October. From wedding cakes, to 
donuts, "We do everything here," 
Doerner said. 

During this holiday season, 
visits to the bakery can include 
getting a glimpse and scent of a 
gingerbread house, gingerbread 
reindeer, or fresh-baked fruit 
cake. Orders for any of these will 
be happily taken at Black Forest, 
or they may be purchased on the 
spot. 

Special Christmas cakes deco- 
rated with the glitter of the holi- 
days including adorable snow- 



men and Santa Gaus petit fours 
are a popular dessert or party 
addition. 

Doerner and his favorite 
helper, his wife, reside right 
upstairs so going to work each 
day is a breezel Sometimes their 
thrcc young children like to come 
into the bakery kitchen and make . 
their own pastries, said their dad. 

Experience for the baker 
comes from working for his par- 
ents who had a bakery of their 
own in Glcnvicw for 27 years, as 
well as another in Chicago. 

On first sight, Doerner liked 
the Black Forest Bakery location. 
He said it reminded him of his 
parents' first shop in Chicago, 
with an apartment upstairs 
where the family lived. 

This is the first business 
Doerner has ever owned by him- 
self. "It's all I've ever wanted," he 
said.— by TINA L. SWIECQ 



Hoor- 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE LaIceIancI Newspapers Dtcimbm \9, 1995 



. 




Centex begins to sell in Lake Villa 

LAKE VILLA— Centex Homes, the nation's largest home 
builder and an Illinois builder for more than 40 years, is Intro- m 
during a new neighborhood, Painted Lakes, in Lake Villa just 
north of Grayslakc. This quiet community is surrounded by a for- 
est preserve, lakes and acres of natural grccnbclt areas. "In this 
155-acre community, more than eighty percent of the home sites 
back up to grccnbclt areas or lakes, creating a secluded country 
atmosphere," says Tony Albachiara, division sales manager. "At 
the same time, Painted Lakes ofTcrs a convenient and accessible 
location that's just 15 minutes from 1-94." For more information 
about Centex Homes' newest community, call 038-5420. 

USA gets marketing assignments 

LINCOLNSHIRE— Jack Shaffer, chairman of Hiffman Shaffer 
Associates, Inc. (USA), has announced that the firm has been 
selected for two marketing assignments in Chicago's north sub- 
urbs. USA's Larry Much and Jonathan Steele will handle mar- 
keting of a 3.5 acre land site at Old Half Day Road and Mil- 
waukee Avenue In Lincolnshire. Steele noted the site would be 
an excellent choice for a retail /office/residential project, located 
in the heart of Lincolnshire's designated development district. 
The other assignment is The Glenvicw Professional Building at 
1000 Dewes Rd. HSA is one of the area's most active real estate 
firms with offices in downtown Chicago, the O'Harc area, 
Napcrvillc, Oakbrook Terrace and Milwaukee. 

Schultz receives AIA award 

HARRINGTON— Ihe American Institute of Architects 
Northeast Illinois Chapter honored David F. Schultz Associates of 
Bamngton with an Excellence Award for the design of the 
Countryside Unitarian Univcrsalists Church of Palatine. Two 
awards for excellence and six merit awards were given at the bien- 
nial I [onor Awards Celebration at McDonald's Lodge in Oak 
Ilrook. The firm, which has been in business for 10 years in 
Harrington, also won an AIA merit award in the last Honor Awards 
competition two years ago for Tailor, Needle and Thread, a retail 
design which also garnered top awards from Chain Store Age 
Executives and the Illuminating Engineering Society. 

Caremark builds in Bannockburn 

BANNOCKBURN— Caremark International, Inc. has broken 
ground in College Park of Bannockburn, according to the park's 
developer, Harry Dolan of Dolan Associates. Contractor for the 
60,000 square-foot office building is Erkilctian Construction Co. of 
Arlington, Virg. The building will house Caremark' s Information 

and Half Day Road (Rte. 22), College Park encompasses one-half 
mile of tollway frontage on the west and abuts Trinity International 
Univ. on the east The fully improved property is zoned for 500,000 
square feet of office/research. Only 25-acres arc still available in the 
park for sale, build-to-suit lease or ground lease. 

Sundance introduces limited designs 

GURNEB— Sundance Homes introduced four traditional floor 
plans to complement the contemporary home designs in the Ravinia 
Series at Ravinia Woods in Gumee. The four limited edition homes 
will be offered on select scenic homesitcs at Ravinia Woods and buy- 
ers may view models of the designs at a nearby Sundance Home 
community. Ravinia Woods is a 300-acre community which will con- 
sist of 402 single-family homes in a beautiful natural setting of 100- 
year-old trees and panoramic vistas of wetlands and open space. 

Abbott declares quarterly dividend 

ABBOTT PARK— The board of directors of Abbott Laboratories 
declared a quarterly common dividend of 21 cents per share. This 
marks the 288th consecutive quarterly dividend to be paid by 
Abbott since 1924. The dividend will be payable Feb. 15, 1996, to 
shareholders of record at the dose of business on Jan. 15, 1996. 



Annual checkup keeps finances healthy 



GREGSEIDLER 

Many people, even though 
they arc healthy, make a point of 
visiting a doctor once a year for a 
fitness checkup to spot potential 
trouble and reduce the likelihood 
of illness. Your finances are simi- 
lar. They also require an annual 
review (at the least) to stay in 
peak condition. 

An annual financial checkup 
consists of two parts. Part one 
consists of reviewing the current 
year's financial progress to make 
sure you arc on course and to 
make any necessary adjustments. 
Part two is gathering and 
reviewing all the -Jocumcnts you 
will need for tax purposes. It Is 
best to complete this as soon as 
possible. After January 1, it is usu- 
ally too late to do anything to 
reduce the previous year's tax 

.bill. 

People's needs and financial 
goals evolve in response to 
changing circumstances. Marital 
status, for example, can have a 
profound impact on your 
finances. Have you been married, 
divorced, widowed or remarried 
during the past 12 months? Did 
you gain any stepchildren as 
dependents or docs any child no 



longer qualify as a dependent? 
Arc you approaching the year in 
which you will retire? People with 
life changes such as these espe- 
cially need to keep an attentive 
finger on their financial pulse. 

Begin by finding the plan you 
developed when you initially 
decided upon your financial 
goals and how to achieve them. 
Also, collect any Investment 
statements you have. Review the 
documents carefully while asking 
yourself these questions: 

1. Do 1 still want to achieve 
these same financial objectives? 

2. Do I now have new or dif- 
ferent financial considerations 
that may change my financial 
goals and the investments I need? 

3. Did the performance of my 
investments over the past 12 
months help me toward my stat- 
ed financial objectives? If not, 
what changes arc needed to get 
back on track? 

There are many other con- 
siderations during an annual 
financial checkup. If you have 
re-married and your spouse has 
children, your insurance needs 
may have changed. Can you add 
to your present policy or is a 
new one a better idea? Arc you 



Bank buys back stock 

Advantage Bancorp Inc. will repurchase up to five percent of 
Its common stock outstanding during the next six months, 
announced Paul P. Bergen, chairman and chief executive offi- 
cer. 

This is Advantage's seventh buyback program since becom- 
ing a public company in March 1992 when it sold 3,300,000 
shares at $11.50 per share. 

The share will be purchased at prevailing market prices from 
time, to time depending upon market conditions. Advantage 
presently has approximately 2,771,000 shares outstanding. 




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125 administrative service will help you set 
up the plan at a rate you can afford. For 
more information, please call: 

Comprehensive Benefit Services 

Daniel E. Coulon, EA 
(708) 223-4040 



-ReaI Estate 
Person neI — 

Deborah Klelter 

Muntlclcin resident, Deborah 
Kicker has joined the Libertyville 
office of Century 21 Krcuser and 
Sciler. Kicker Is a graduate of Lake 
Zurich High School and the 
University of Iowa (economics). 
She was affiliated with RE/MAX 
Homes 



Northwest 
and her 
prior work 
experience 
included ZF 
Industries 
(Vernon 
Hills) as a 
sales 
•account 
manager 
and T and M 
Engineering 
in Wheeling. 




Want a home that's comfortable, 
healthy and energy-efficient? 



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contributing regularly to fund 
your retirement? Have you 
updated your will and do you 
have additional estate planning 
needs? 

Often the kinds of questions a 
financial checkup raises arc not 
simple to answer. They can he 
emotional and technically com- 
plex. But the sooner you address 
them, the more likely it is that 
you will have a greater range of 
options from which to choose. 

Once you have analyzed your 
overall financial status, the sec- 
ond step is taxes. Ignoring the 
coming tax season during a 
financial checkup can be very 
costly. Many people pay hun- 
dreds, if not thousands, of tax 
dollars they could have legally 
avoided had they taken the time 
well before the end of the year to 
review their tax status. 

Editor's note: Greg Seidler, 
CPA is a registered representative 
of H.D. Vest Investments 
Securities, Inc. All material pre- 
sented is general in nature and 
should not be accepted without 
professional assistance. Contact 
Seidler in Libertyville at 680-0095. 



We Leo me 
WAqoN 

Has useful gifts and helpful 
information for you... : 

ALL FREE! 

Just Engaged? New Parent? Moved? 

Antloch 

Joretta ' . Jan 
838-3430 305-0783 

Fox Lako/lnglosid./ 

Jennifer 
740-3630 . 

Grays fa ko 
Lake Villa 

Wlldwood 

Viola Linda 

336-5971 223-1607 



Gurnoe 

Patti 
223-6498 



Linda 
735-0650 



Lake Zurich 

Ann 
540-5790 

Libertyville 
Green Oaks 



Sally 
6B0-1599 



Donna 
263-8339 



Lincolnshire 

Lett/ 



945-3161 



Llndenhurst 

Marilyn Janet 

508-4232 587-5709 

Long Grove 

Klldeer 

Hawthorn Woods 



Debby 
949-6167 



Maty 
438-0287 



Mundeloln 

Karen 
566-4263 



Round Lake Area 

Phebe Pam 

223-8504 548-1564 

Spring Grove 

Chris Jill 

973-1202 587-8656 

Vernon Hills 

Letty Doris 

945-3161 660-7276 

Zlon/ 
Wlnthrop Harbor 

Karen Orvetta 

. 395-5629 872-1706 

You are entitled to a complimentary 
subscription from your hometown 
newspaper. Jo receive your paper, 
contact your Welcome Wagon rep- 
resentative or call Lakeland News- 
papers at (708) 223-8161. For in- 
formation about positions with the 
Welcome Wagon call Maria at 
(708)577-3637. 









- 



Pccmbt«iy, 1995 UklANd Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Lakeland Newspapers welcomes 
new regional editor, sports editor 




The general manager of 
Lakeland Newspapers has 
announced the appointment of 
two editor positions for the week- 
ly newspaper division. 

Ncal Tucker, who has been a 
member of the Lakeland 
Newspapers staff for two years, 
has been promoted to the posi- 
tion of regional editor for five of 
the Lakeland Newspaper edi- 
tions. 

Daniel Ramage, a Round 
Lake Beach resident, is now serv- 
ing as the sports editor for all 13 
Lakeland Newspapers' mast- 
heads. 

Tucker, an Old Mill Creek 
resident, has nine years of 
newspaper experience- in both 
advertising and editorial posi- 
tions for several national news- 
paper conglomerates. He has 
served as Lakeland Newspapers' 





Break 



From page CI 

Kinney estimated about 3,500 
people came through. On week- 
ends shoppers can expect a 15- to 
20- minute wait. 

"It's very well run," she said. 
"People are willing to wait to 
relax. They're really enjoying it" 

The chairs, priced at $2,500, 
are available for sale along with 
all the other relaxation products, 
in case those who try them out 
decide they would make good 
holiday gifts. 

"Business is becoming so 
much' more ' demanding, " said 
Kinney. "Everyone is so stressed 
out with their jobs. A lot of people 
arc really focusing on their 
health." 



Neal Tucker 

business and health editor as 
well as reporter for the 
Grayslakc area for the past 18 
months. He received a first 
place award from the Illinois 
Press Association for a business 
scries on Lake County farming 
in 1995. 

Tucker is the regional editor 
for the Mundelcin News, 
Ubertyvilie News, Vernon HiUs 
News, Wauconda Leader and 
Lake Zurich Enterprise. Tucker 
and his wife, Robin,, have two 
children. 

Ramage, comes to Lakeland 
Newspapers, from a position as 
associate editor, Meyers 
Communications Group, 

Northficld, 111. Prior to his posi- 
tion at Meyers, Ramage was the 
assistant managing editor for 
the Dally Gazette In Sterling, 111 

and also served as a sports - 
writer and lifestyles editor for 
the paper. He has garnered sev- 
eral awards from the Illinois 



Daniel Ramage 

Press Association for his sports, 
feature and news writing. 

Ramage brings more than 
seven years of journalism experi- 
ence to the staff. He and his wife, 
Diane, have four children. 

Additionally, Suzie Reed, is 
now serving as Business, Health 
and Lakelife editor in addition to 
her duties as the Mundelcin area ' 
reporter. 

Claudia Lenart, who has 
been with Lakeland Newspapers 
for five years, will continue- as 
regional editor for the Antioch 
News'- Reporter, Lake Villa 
Record, Lindcnhurst News, 
Grayslakc Times, Round Lake 
News, Fox Lake Press, Warren- 
Newport Press and Gurnee 
Press. 

"We , believe these, promo- 
tions are in -Unq with our efforts 
to continue to give our readers* 

the highest quality weekly paper 
in Lake County," said Rhonda 
Hctrick Burke, editor in chief. 




End of an era 

Ed Kapp writes down the number of the buyer oh a piece of 
equipment that was auctioned at Anchor Glass Container 
Corporation. Technology has forced the glass company to 
close Ihelr Waukegan plant. —Photo by Linda Chapman 






Minimal job growth projected for Lake County j 



Lake County area employers 
arc painting a lackluster hiring 
picture, based on Manpower 
Inc.'s just released survey of busi- 
nesses 1 workforce requirements 
heading into 1996. 

The Lake County Employment 
Outlook Survey for January, 
February and March shows that 
14 percent of employers con- 
tacted about their labor force 
plans will add people this winter, 
while 11 percent foresee fewer 
workers. The other 75 percent 
reveal staffing will remain con- 
stant. • 

"The outlook was more 
promising a year ago," said 
Chuck Battels of Manpower, 
"when 20 percent said they would 
hire and 7 percent anticipated 
cutbacks. The survey three 
months ago reported 13 percent 
were intending to increase staff 
while 13 percent also thought 
workforce reductions were indi- 
cated." Bartcls added that, in 
general, employment tends to- 
ward sluggishness in the winter 
months. 

Job opportunities this winter 
appear best in durable goods 
manufacturing, wholesale/retail 
trade and education. Staff cut- 
backs are projected in 
transportation/ public utilities 
and services. 

Nationally, seasonal condi- 
tions will predominate as the job 
market struggles with economic 
uncertainty. Of the companies 
surveyed, 20 percent will in- 
crease their staffs, 12 percent 
will reduce employment rolls, 64 
percent expect to stay at current 



levels and 4 percent are unde- 
cided. 

Manpower Inc. conducts the 
Employment Outlook Survey on a 
quarterly 'basis. It is a mea- 
surement of employers' inten- 
tions to increase or decrease the 
permanent workforce, and dur- 
ing its 19-year history has been a 
significant indicator of em- 



ployment trends. The survey is 
based on telephone interviews 
with more than 15,000 public and 
private employers in 481 U.S. 
cities. Manpower Inc. is the 
world's largest temporary help 
firm, annually providing em- 
ployment to 1.5 "million people 
through more than 2,000 offices 
in 38 countries. 



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Lakeland 

Newspapers 



& 



Forefronts 



Lakeland Newspapers' in-depth progress edition, Forefronts, will be published Feb. 9, 1996. We are 
seeking reader input for use in this special section. Please return your comments by Dec. 17 to: 



Forefronts Survey 
Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

1 . Who is the most influential person in Lake County? . _ 

2. What is the top recreational spot in Lake County? 

3. Name your favorite Lake County restaurant. — ; ___ — 

4. What is the best night spot in Lake County? _ 

5. Name the worst road in Lake County. 



You can also fax us at 2 
E-Mail response to: ediU&jiidi 



v-O 



II 



6. What is your biggest concern about the future of Lake County? 



7. What is the best reason for living in Lake County? 



Town in which you live. 



\**W3'J 




CLASSIFIED UIccIancI Newspapers DccEMbcn 15, 199$ 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



S 



Charles G.. Baumann, Sr., 

Age B5* of Grayslakc passed away Wednesday, 
December 6, 1995 at Pavilllon Nursing Home, 
Waukcgan. He was born in St. Paul, Minnesota 
February 4, 1910 and spent most of his young life in 
Wausau, Wisconsin where his grandparents lived, fin- 
ishing grammar school and high school. Later the fam- 
ily returned to St. Paul and was employed as a painter 
with his father and also a machinist with Great 
Northern Railroad. He joined the U.S.N, in May 1943 as 
a Scabce serving for 24 years with most of his duty In 
ihe South Pacific retiring in 1969 as Chief Machinist E* 
7. He was a member of the United Protestant Church in 
Grayslakc, The Fleet Reserve, Waukcgan Branch, Life 
member of American A.A.R.P., and Grayslakc Historical 

Society. 

Survivors include his loving wife of 28 years, Bessie 
Craft Baumann; 2 sons, Charles [Carol) Baumann, 
Robert (MaryK.) Baumann; daughter-in-law, Ruth 
Baumann; step daughter, Audrey (Arthur) Evans; 15 
grandchildren; 15 great grandchildren; numerous 
friends. 

Funeral services were held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, 
December 9, 1995 at Strang Funeral Chapel, LTD., 410 
E. Bclvidcrc Rd., Grayslakc. Rev. James Connor, Pastor 
United Protestant Church, Grayslakc officiated. 
Interment followed at North shore Garden of Memories, 
North Chicago. Visitation was held on Friday from 4-9 
p.m. 

Irene A. LaMont, 

Age 72, of Lake Villa passed away Thursday, 
December 7, 1995 at Crown Manor Nursing Facility In 
Zion. She was born on March 26, 1923 in Chicago. She 
lived in the Lake Villa area for the past 42 years. She was 
a member of Prince of Peace In Lake Villa. She was 
active in the Women's Auxilary - American Legion Post 
1219, Lake Villa and a member of the Lake County 
Mounted Posse. 

Survivors include her husband, John LaMont, Sr.; her 

children, John (.Lisa) LaMont, Jr. of Laurel, Florida, Carol 

(Don) Decker of Kenosha, Wisconsin, Patrick (Carolyn) 

LaMont of Lake Villa, Michael (fiance Tcrrl) LaMont of 

Gurncc, ludy .(Kenneth) Cryzewlcfc ot Lindcnhursl and 

Timothy LaMont of Round Lake; 11 grandchild rcn. 

I'ttitcritt marvlcom wuro holti m XO:30 a.m. Saturday, 

December 7, 1995 "at Rlnga Funeral Home, 122 S. 
Milwaukee Ave. (Rte. 83), Lake Villa. Interment was at 
Ascension Cemetery, Libcrtyvillc. Visitation was 
Saturday morning from 9:30 a.m. until the time of ser- 
vice. 

Victoria Delores Kolodzinski, 

Age 64, of Round Lake Beach, passed away in her 
family home on Tuesday, December 5, 1995. She was 
born in Chicago on November 7, 1931 to John F. and 
Frances (nee Schumacher) Murphy. Since 1981 she was 
employed with Basic Electronics in Round Lake as an 
Inspector of Quality Control. On May 11, 1951, Victoria 
married Eugene G. Kolodzinskl. 

Survivors include her husband, Eugene; 6 children, 
Eileen (Claudio) Umlauf of Round Lake Park, Carol 
(George) Gilder of Houston, Texas, Diane (Mike) Smoot 
of Uxbridgc, Massachusetts, Eugene G. (Ramona) 
Kolodzinski of Round Lake Beach and Arthur (Robin) 
Kolod/.inski of Round Lake Beach; 14 grandchildren; 2 
greatgrandchildren; 1 brother, John (Elaine) Murphy of 
Florida; I sister, Joan (Anthony) Rosselti of Chicago; 
many nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death by 
both her parents and 2 nephews, Veto and John 
Rossctli. 

Visitation was hcid from 4-9 p.m. on Thursday, 
December 7, 1995 at Justcn's Round Lake Funeral 
Home, 222 N. Roscdale CL, Round Lake. A blessing was 
at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, Decemhcr 8, 1995 at St. 
Joseph's Catholic Church, 114 N. Lincoln Ave., Round 
Lake. Rev. Robert Filzpa trick officiated. Interment was 
private. In her ^ , ' , TT" , ". memorial contributions may 
be made lot; 

James A. ft' 

Age 42, of Miiwaui to, Wisconsin formerly of Anlioch 
passed away Sunday, December 10, 1995 at his home. 
He was born November 3, 1953 in Waukcgan the son of 
Frederick C and Mary C, (Smolinski) Miller. He had 
lived In the Antioch area before moving to Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin twenty years ago. He was a graduate of 
Antioch Community High and attended Bradley 
University in Peoria, later earning a degree in Computer 
Programming from Milwaukee Area Technical College. 

Survivors include his mother, Mary C. Miller of 
Antioch; 3 sisters, Dolores (Paul) Richards of Zion, 
Marion (Robert) January of Fairchild, Wisconsin, 
Elizabeth (David) Cullen of Jolict; 2 brothers, George 
(Deborah) and Fred Jr. (Doris) both of Twin Lakes, 
Wisconsin; many nieces and nephews. He was preced- 
ed in death by his father, Frederick on November 3, 
1989. 

Funeral services were held a't 11 a.m. Thursday, 
December 14, 1995 at the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 
Main Street (Rte. 83) Anlioch. Interment was in the 
Mound Prairie Cemetery, Twin Lakes, Wisconsin. 



Ila Mae Lasco, 

Age 06, of Antioch passed away at her home at her 
home Friday, December 8, 1995. She was born May 1, 
1909 In Walmut, Illinois the daughter of the late Andrew 
and LoucIIa (Whltvcr) Anderson moving to Antioch in 
1924. On October 22, 1925 she married H. Lullvcr Lasco 
in Waukcgan. She and her husband founded Lasco's 
Greenhouse in Antioch on August 1, 1945. !ri 1975 their 
daughter Beverly Rcckers assumed the operation with 
her mother as Lasco's Florist, inc., which continues to 
be the oldest retail business in Antioch. Ha was a mem- 
ber of the United Methodist Church and the Women's 
Circle In Anlioch and an Honorary member of the 
Anlioch Women's Club. 

Survivors include 2 daughters, Beverly (Preston) 
Rcckers of Antioch and Carol Dclany of Bcdminstcr, 
New Jersey; 1 son, Ralph Lasco of Palnesville, Ohio; 1 
sister, Florence Brown of Antioch; a brother, Cecil L. 
Anderson of Carpentcrsvillc, Illinois; 8 grandchildren; 
12 great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by 
her husband on October 29, 1982, her slcp-mothcr, 
Edna Anderson, a brother, Burt Anderson, her daugh- 
tcr-ln-law, Sylvia Lasco. 

Funeral services were held at 1 1 a.m. Tuesday, 
December 12, 1995 at the United Methodist Church, 848 
Main St., Antioch. Rev. Kurt Gamlin officiated. 
Interment was in Hillside Cemetery, Anlioch. 
Arrangements were entrusted to the Strang Funeral 
Home, 1055 Main SL (Rte. 83), Anlioch. 

Elsie Horton, 

Age 93, of Bulvcrde, Texas formerly of Antioch, 
passed away Wednesday, December 6, 1995 at her resi- 
dence. She was born in 1902 to Joseph and Mildred 
Panowski in Lake ForesL In 1924 she met and married 
Louis Horton. Mrs. Horton was a member of SL Paul 
Lutheran Church in Bulvcrde. 

Survivors include her daughter, Karen Kublank and 
husband Craig of Albuquerque, New Mexico; grand- 
children, Charles Horton Jr.. lames Horton, Susan 
Mctlcn, Matthew Horton, Louis Horton , Samaniha 

Sulla. Ko'vtn Kirk, ilrJari Kirk, Shan nun Ah rends, Cody 

Kirk, Mark Kublank, Sandra Chapman, Laura Parsons; 
24 grandchildren. She was preceded in death by hr hus- 
band in 1972, her daughter, Barbara Kirk, son , David 
Horton. 

Funeral services were held at 1030 a.m. at SL Paul 
Lutheran Church, Bulvcrde, Texas with interment fol- 
lowing in SL Paul Lutheran Cemetery. Visitation was 
held at 5 p.m. on Friday. Memorials may be made to SL 
Paul Lutheran Church, Bulvcrde, Texas. 




Scmelimes an 

old-fashioned 

song 

Brings us a 

thought of 

you; 

Scmetimes a 

flowep as 

we pass 

along, 

Dp a sky thai 
is azupe blue; 

Cp a silvep 

Bning in Ihe 

crfciwfe, 

When Ihe sun 

is peeping 

thpeugh. 

All cf these 

things, snake 
us think cf 



you. 




Gviefnotes 

You can help in a number of special ways. 
Through Teaching out and offering support in the 
form of listening and presence you will help a 
great deal. Ask your friend how they are doing. 
Mention the deceased by name and allow the 
bereaved to continue discussion about the 
deceased if they wish. Many bereaved report feel- 
ing isolated. You can help by including them in 
your social groups. Contact with the 

How can I help someone 
who is grieving? 

grieving is the most important during the period 
right after the death and in the three or four 
months following when the bereaved feel espe- 
cially isolated. Reach out and make your pres- 
ence felt. 

% % Oiamshtr 

funeral !tfome Ltd. 



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'<]&& CftaptCon the Lake' 

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Phone:(703)587-2100 • (815)385-1001 




mm 




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FuneraI Director^ 



JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Ct, Round Lake, IL 

(708)546-3300 

Jeffrey Jordan, Manager/Director 

Mark Justen, Owner/ Director 

GEORGE R. JUSTEN & 
SON FUNERAL HOME 

3519 W. Elm St, McHenry IL 

(815)385-2400 
Mark Justen, Owner /Director 

JUSTEN'S WONDER LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

761 1 Hancock Dr., Wonder Lake 

(815) 728-0233 

Valerie Kessel, Manager/Director 

Mark Justen, Owner/Director 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(708) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa,Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL 

410 E. Belvidere Rd. 

Grays lake, I L 

(708)223-8122 

David G. Strang and 

Richard A Gaddis, Directors 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

(708) 395-4000 
Dan Dugenske, Director 




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